Port Hope, Ontario Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Port Hope, Ontario Book 3

Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
44 Pine Street North – c. 1816 – The two-story brick house in the Tudor Manor style has a steeply pitched gable roof, two chimneys, decorative buttresses, stepped gables with thickly molded windows, and enclosed front porch. on the ground floor there are double casement sash windows with Gothic tracery and a quatrefoil pattern in the top two panes. On the frontispiece above the brick porch is a Gothic arched double casement sash window. The brick porch is reinforced at the corners by attached pillars.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
82 Victoria Street South – Arthur Trefusis Heneage Williams House (Penryn Park) – c. 1859 – Penryn Park is an excellent example of the Cottage Gothic house. It includes details such as barge board trim truer to the medieval pattern in their cusped and carved form than the lacy interpretation common to other buildings of the period. The house has hood molds to openings and a Chinese pagoda roof over a rear second-story window and a tower at the entrance, which might be expected of the mid-nineteenth century Picturesque. Fine finials and pendants adorn the gables. A long verandah with chamfered pillars runs along the south side of the house; originally narrow, it was widened by three feet in 1895. The house is constructed of local bright red brick with woodwork painted the appropriate period color of Tuscan red. The front steps display cast-iron risers. The oldest chimney is a joined chimney with six flues. Penryn Park was built for one of Port Hope’s most famous citizens – Colonel Arthur Trefusis Heneage Williams. His father, John Tucker Williams, came to Canada during the War of 1812 and later settled in Port Hope to become its first Mayor. Arthur T.H. Williams was born in Port Hope in 1837. Arthur attended Upper Canada College in Toronto and Edinburgh University in Scotland. Like his father, he held many responsible positions in the town in addition to managing the family’s business enterprises that included large land holdings and investments in timber and mines. His political career included being elected several times to the Ontario legislature from 1865 to 1875, and later holding the position of Conservative MP in Ottawa from 1878 to 1885. After his marriage to Emily Seymour in 1859, Colonel A.T.H. Williams commissioned architect Edward Haycock to design his house named Penryn Park on the vast acreage adjacent to his father’s house, Penryn Homestead (82 Victoria Street). A.T.H. Williams is best remembered for his military career. He was Colonel of the 46th Regiment and saw service during the Fenian Invasion. As Commander of the Midland battalion during the Riel rebellion of 1885, he led a daring charge against the Metis that resulted in victory at Batoche, Saskatchewan.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
82 Victoria Street South – John Tucker Williams House (Penryn Homestead) – c. 1828-1829 – The exterior appearance is the result of extensive alterations made in the 1890s. These included the bricking over of the roughcast walls, the building of the two projecting porches to the north and south through the full height of the house, and a rebuilding of the roof, which altered its pitch and extended its eaves. The exterior double doors have a rectangular transom above them. The roof is a medium pitched hip with center flat deck and has brick chimneys. Each of the projecting porches has returned eaves, ornamental dentils, and a small circular window below the peak. From the main facade projection extends a porch with fluted Doric pillars and a carved radiating fan decoration in the pediment. On the north front projection is a pair of shuttered casement windows, and on the north facade wall are four two-over-two double hung shuttered sash windows.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
17 Victoria Street South – Samuel Coombe Cottage – c. 1860 – This is a one story high hip-roofed Ontario cottage, roughly square in plan with an ell to the rear. Constructed in stretcher-bond brick, it stands on a level site on a corner lot. The facade is symmetrically arranged around a central front door flanked by sidelights and transom. The gable is decorated with barge board and accented by a round-headed window and topped by a spike finial and ornament. Of special interest is the front door vestibule that could be seasonally removed in the warmer months. Samuel Coombe (1826-1905) was born in Stowford County, Devon England emigrating to Port Hope during the prosperous early 1850’s. He made a contribution as a carpenter during the building boom, and into the following decades.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
345 Lakeshore Road – William & Augusta Fraser House (Dunain) – c. 1857 – It was named Dunain (translated means Hill of the Birds) after the family’s ancestral home near Inverness in Scotland. The house was built by William A. Fraser on land given by his wife’s family, the Williams, owners of Penryn Homestead. In 1898, the house was taken over by Mr. Fraser’s daughter, Sarah and her husband, Frederick Barlow Cumberland. The Cumberland coat of arms etched on stained glass graces the front entrance window. The style of the original house is Loyalist Georgian with its dignified symmetry but this house exhibits a breakaway from the rigid symmetry of earlier Georgian houses. The porch and portico were added to the north side in the latter part of the century, as was the conservatory to the south, which was rebuilt again in the early part of the 20th century. The original portion of the house is a two-story red brick structure with a symmetrically placed front door, and symmetrically placed windows. The roof is a hip roof with wide overhangs and bold cornice fascia. The roof culminates in a glass roofed Belvedere bringing light into the central hall below. There is a west wing, probably originally servants’ quarters constructed in the same manner as the main house and capped by a Belvedere, lighting the center hall of this wing. A further addition was made to this west wing to accommodate a more modern kitchen, constructed in a similar manner to the original house. In the latter part of the 19th century, the front portico and porch were added to the north side of the house, the style of which is more Classic Revival popular in that period. The porch is a good example of the classical period with classical Doric columns and a wide entablature and in-filled with large windows extending to the ceiling inside. These windows are an eight over sixteen central window with four over eight sidelights on both floors, and sides of the portico and paneled. The railing for the upper porch completes this classical composition. To the southeast is a conservatory constructed in steel and is an excellent example of early 20th century greenhouse construction. This present structure replaces an earlier conservatory.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
22 Shortt Street -Thomas White House – c. 1890 – The style of this frame two-story house can be described as cottage with horizontal wood ship lap siding, six over six windows and simple trim. The plan is unusual with a side entrance accentuated by a simple but elegant porch. High pitched cross axis roofs add particular interest to this house. The front of the house has a picket fence. White was originally from England, born in 1838, and as of the 1881 census had four daughters and one son. The house remained in the White family for many decades transferring to the White children in 1929.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
48 Bloomsgrove Avenue – Thomas B. Chalk House – c. 1890 – This late Victorian two-story brick house has fine brick detailing. The center bay of the house has two large arched windows (typical of the Romanesque style) with stained glass semicircular transoms. Above is a protruding bay window in frame with fine wood detailing and a large arched top central window. The peak of the roof above has decorative fretwork suggesting a more Edwardian period. The side bay has a similar arched top window. On either side of the house is a porch. The west porch protects the front door located on the side of the building, while the east porch provides a kitchen entrance. Each of these porches has decorative columns and fretwork. A side bay window is similar to the front bay window. The brickwork has decorative brick arches over windows, brick corbels with specially formed brick, brick banding, and decorative brick chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
5 Bloomsgrove Avenue – Robert Horsey House – c. 1870 – Robert Horsey was a Port Hope carpenter. This one and a half story, two bay house is rectangular in plan and constructed of brick veneer laid in stretcher bond with a coarse rubble foundation. The roof is a high gable, gable end to the street, and contains some decorative trim at the apex. The eaves consist of a plain boxed cornice. The shuttered windows on the upper story are six over six double-hung sash with plain surround and lugsills. The decorative details on the porch are Victorian details.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
98 Ontario Street – Thomas Wickett House (Penstowe) – c. 1894 – Although built in the Queen Anne Revival style, it has detailing of the Romanesque style. The roof is irregular and complicated, but is composed basically of several steeply pitched gables and one overhanging gable dormer. The gables are pedimented with some rafters exposed. The pediment has a set of triple windows in a bold wooden surround. Trimming the windows are tooled pilasters and heavy entablature. Decorative shingles complete the pediment. The stretcher-bond brick house has various types of structural openings from flat on the top story, to segmental on the projecting south bay, to rounded Romanesque on the front facade. Voussoirs head most windows, but protruding arched gables of brick surround the semi-elliptical openings. Stringer courses join the sills of the house and join the tips of the arches on the main facade. The main door is set in one of the arched openings, but is itself flat. The house has a second-story bell-cast balcony adorned with heavy turned balusters and turned columns. The balcony roof is supported by brackets and has a molded frieze. The open end of the balcony is partially filled by lattice-like woodwork. The spooled columns are turned and have a rounded, bulbous appearance. On the first story, a shed-roofed porch with the same characteristics can be seen. The house sits on a squared-stone foundation with segmental basement windows.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
162 Peter Street – This two-story house is indicative of the Italianate Style Victorian house. A symmetrically placed entrance is noted for its heavily decorated portico topped by iron balustrade made in the foundry of the original owner. The entrance is flanked by two bay windows with similar iron topping. The roof overhangs are supported by brackets typical of this Italianate period and is topped by a widow’s walk. The semi-circular window over the entrance designed in a Florentine pattern is of particular interest. Another interesting point is the unusual width of the overhanging eaves with their double brackets.

Port Hope, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Port Hope, Ontario Book 2

Before Canada became a nation in 1867, Port Hope was already a boom town. Its main streets were thronged with horse-drawn carriages and farmers’ wagons, its plank sidewalks crowded with shoppers and merchandise. Wood-burning locomotives pulled heavily loaded trains through town on their way to a harbor filled with schooners and steamships. Solid brick commercial blocks and houses lined the streets.

The town grew rapidly from four families of English descent who arrived by boat in 1793 and settled at the river mouth. Until then the area had been home to aboriginal groups—Huron, then Iroquois, and finally Mississauga—attracted by the salmon and sturgeon that swarmed in its river.

The first European settlers came from the new United States. They had chosen to follow the British crown after the American Revolution. More families arrived including blacksmiths, carpenters, bricklayers, and merchants. The mills drew farmers from fifty and sixty kilometers away. Grain that could not be milled was bought by distilleries—there were eventually five along the river—that produced a famous Port Hope whisky. In 1856 the Grand Trunk Railway connected Port Hope to Toronto and the Atlantic seaboard. Its viaduct over the Ganaraska River was the second greatest engineering challenge on the route, exceeded only by bridging the St. Lawrence River at Montreal.

Another railway heading north from Port Hope opened up the vast timberlands and new farms of central Ontario and stretched to Peterborough and Lindsay. Eventually it reached Georgian Bay, at Midland. Down this line came great loads of timber and grain. Some went east to England, but most was exported to the USA through Rochester across the lake.

Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
86 John Street – The Bank of Upper Canada – c. 1857 – The three-story brick structure is almost square and is a good example of Italianate architecture with a flat roof, protruding eaves supported by ornamental molded brackets, tall and round-headed windows and decorative window trim. The exterior walls have recessed panels in the brickwork and the white brick was manufactured in Toronto. A stone band course separates the coursed rubble foundation from the brick structure. On the main facade, there are nine openings, two windows and one entrance way on the first story, and three windows on each of the second and third floors. The first story windows are round-headed and six over three double hung with a round-headed center pane and five surrounding panes over three vertical panes. These windows are surmounted by molded wooden “pedimental” surrounds. Double pilasters on each side are formed out of the brick. The second story windows are flat six over nine double hung sash, surmounted by molded “entablature” surrounds with a central flourish, and bordered by single brick pilasters. The center window has been replaced by French doors, and opens out to the cast iron railed balcony on top of the front porch. The original cast iron balconies of the other second story windows have been replaced by plain modern iron rails. Three projecting rows of brick form the sills on the second story fenestration. The third story windows have segmental molded wood heads, and have brick pilasters at the sides, and wooden lugsills with supporting brackets. The Bank of Upper Canada was established in York (Toronto) in 1822. Until its demise in 1866, the bank was one of British North America’s leading banks. It played a significant role in the financial development of Upper Canada.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
94 John Street – J.D. Smith House – c. 1835 – symmetrical arrangement of windows around the central front door with pilastered doorcase and transom, two-story gable roof with brick end chimneys, timber frame construction sheathed in clapboard. A one story hipped roof addition is at the side, and if not original is fairly early; it provided a separate entrance to the taproom. The house had its historic beginnings as a local tavern.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
25 John Street – Meredith House – c. 1853 – This symmetrical design with two-story bay windows flanking the wide double entrance is a good example of late Victorian brick building. Decorative trim appears on the front facade. A flat roof, simple chimney, and two-story verandah are additional features.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
27 John Street – The Cochrane House – c. 1848 – This two and a half story frame dwelling is an early example of the Greek Revival. It is a square house with a side-hall plan and gable roof. The main facade has three bays and the main entrance to the house is located on the north side of the facade. The entrance is simple, yet gracefully done. The wide, closed transom, with its plain entablature, helps to frame the entrance. On either side of the door are plain, wooden pilasters. The entrance is reached by a wide flight of stairs. All of the windows have the original sashes of six panes over six panes. They all have molded wooden surrounds and flush wooden sills. The Cochrane House is named for James Cochrane, the original owner and proprietor of the Queen’s Hotel (81 Walton Street). James Cochrane (1815-1900) was born in County Down, Ireland in 1815. He came to Canada in 1841, and settled in Port Hope. In 1871, he built the Queen’s Hotel.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
50 John Street – Y.M.C.A. (Young Men’s Christians Association) – c. 1874 – The main floor of the two-story front contains round arched main entrance (asymmetrically placed) and secondary flat-arched entrance at left. Between are brick pilasters enclosing a plain window and transom. The second story has a central projecting panel into which a circular window with quatrefoil glazing is placed. Twinned narrow windows, symmetrically placed, complete the composition. Separating the two storys is a band course. The cornice is molded and at center is an unusual peak with applied ornament. The roof is of the shed type.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
10-12 Mill Street South – Customs House and Registry Office – c. 1845 – This three-story parapet gabled brick commercial building retains its original features on the upper storys but has been considerably altered on the ground floor level, although the separate three entrances still remain. Five double-hung sash are on the second and third floors. The medium peaked roof is supported by decorative eave brackets on the front facade. A wooden shop front cornice runs along the front facade. T. Ward was the Registrar during that period and by 1853 this building was being used as the Customs House and Registry Office. Port Hope was constituted as a port of entry in 1819, however, it was not until 1829, that a harbor was established. A wharf was constructed on the east side of the river and a pier was established on the west side. By the late 1840s, Port Hope was a bustling port and busy commercial area; modifications and expansions were made to the harbor in the ensuing decades. As a port of entry, a Customs House was required. Additionally, the building served as the Registry Office, a repository of legal land transactions until 1871, when a separate Registry Office was built on the north side of Mill Street (17 Mill Street North).
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
17 Mill Street North – County Registry Office East Durham – c. 1871 – The Land Registry Office is an attractive Neo-Classical brick building, simple in its single story silhouette and gable roof of medium pitch. The gable end, which forms a triangular pediment, faces the street and presents a three-bay facade with projecting vestibule. All the door and window openings are crowned with true semi-circular arches. On the facade these are recessed into arched brick panels and topped with keystones. Band courses in brick and a plinth add decorative emphasis to the masonry. Still visible and of significance is the painted sign over the front door that reads “East Durham 1871. The structure is unique, composed of three brick vaults that run across the width of the building. The building’s prime objective, fireproofing, was essential to its role as a safe depository for all legal documents affecting land ownership. It follows a plan established by the provincial government in the 1870s.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
37-41 Mill Street North – This is a three story, brick building with gable roof with parapet walls and end chimneys. The windows at street level are conventional sash. At second and third storys, the windows are glazed in original six over six sash. The brick arches are remarkable for the angle of their splay, which creates a decorative pattern unusual in Port Hope. The upper cornice is distinguished by a decorative bracket and molded boards. 41 Mill Street – Crawford Block – c. 1848 – is the north third (left of picture) of a very important terrace. Henry Howard Meredith purchased the Crawford Block in July 1853. Robert Crawford, a saddler and tanner located on Ward Street, had built the block. In 1853, Henry Howard Meredith acquired this block of townhouses. In a rental advertisement of 1860, he described the townhouses as “three comfortable three story Brick Dwelling houses on Mill Street North of the Post Office. These houses are particularly well adapted for persons requiring residences in the business part of Town, or for persons wanting a dwelling house with offices adjoining”.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
46 Cavan Street – c. 1842 – The Chalk Works is one of the few buildings that remain from Port Hope’s industrial heyday. The brick structure stands three storys high with a gable roof, rounded corner in header bond. Robert Chalk (1820-1890), an English immigrant born in Biddeford, Devonshire, England, settled in Port Hope in 1842 at the age of 22, and established a wagon and carriage-making business. Chalk Carriage Works was located on Cavan Street on the steep hill where South and Cavan Street meet, a hill that was sometimes referred to as Chalk’s Hill. Many of Port Hope’s early industries were located on Cavan Street on the Ganaraska River. The Chalk Carriage Works manufactured lumber wagons, cutters and carriages and provided blacksmithing as well.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
72 Augusta Street – Smith Cottage – c. 1865 – This is a 1½ story brick cottage perched high on a hill with a grand overlook to the south. The porch was restored based on archival photos. The simple center hall plan is punctuated by a protruding center bay entrance.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
78 Augusta Street – Thomas McCreery House – c. 1875 – This is a late Victorian Italianate design, with the characteristic irregular plan, ell-shape to the front and with the tower crowned by a steeply pitched mansard roof, with a gable and with iron cresting to the small flat deck. The ornamented window heads and door arch with their incised decoration, projecting keystones and scrolls are probably cast stone. Florid Renaissance detail, multi paneled doors and square towers are typical of the Italianate style. Brown and green were popular colors used on details. Thomas McCreery was the proprietor of a billiard saloon on Walton Street during the late 1860s and early 1870s. By the 1880s, he was a grocer on Mill Street, and later sold ale and porter from a shop located in the Robertson Building at the corner of Queen and Walton (35 Walton Street).
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
86 Augusta Street – James Leverich House – c. 1877 – The house is a good example and characteristic of a mid-Victorian villa in the picturesque manner. Two story bay windows and paired brackets to eaves are typical of late Victorian houses. The basement wall material is rubble, and the brickwork is stretcher bond. There is one chimney on the east side of the house and two on the left, or west side, all made of brick. The main door surround is of plain wood. In 1887, James S. Leverich purchased the property. Leverich (1828-1892) was born in Otisco, New York. By 1857, he had established himself as a merchant selling groceries and liquors on Walton Street. By the early 1870s, he established a business as a lumber merchant selling lumber, lath and shingles. The house remained in the Leverich family until 1920.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
89 Dorset Street West – William Sisson House (Wimbourne) – c. 1853 – The well-balanced square house exhibits features of the Regency style. The roof is a variation of the truncated hipped roof with a medium pitch. On each side there is a center-hipped gable with attractive barge board. William Sisson (1801-1885) born in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, New York built Wimbourne House. He emigrated to Port Hope in June 1823. His wife, Elisa Ann Walton, was born in Upper Canada in 1805. He manufactured leather. Mr. Sisson, father of four children, was an active member of the Durham Agricultural Society and served as its treasurer for forty years. He was an active promoter of the first Mechanic’s Institute, and raised and commanded a troop of cavalry (attached to the Durham Regiment), which assisted in the suppression of the rebellion of 1837-38.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
108 Dorset Street West – 2½-storey frontispiece with cornice return on gable and trefoil window
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
115 Dorset Street West – Thomas Clarke House (The Cone) – c. 1858 – The one and a half story grey board and batten house incorporates some elements of the Gothic Revival style. It has steeply pitched gables, the appearance of irregularity because of complex roof patterns, pointed arched openings such as the Gothic window above the doorway, and decorative details including the quatrefoil window tracery in this same window, the barge boards in the gable peaks and the finial. A notable feature of the exterior is, the board and batten, was preferred by Downing for he believed that it was more economical than clapboard, and because it was a bolder method of construction, it better expressed the picturesque beauty essentially belonging to wooden houses. The main facade has three pairs of four over four double-hung sashes, a bay projection containing three casement windows, and five six over six double-hung sashes. The central double doors each have twelve windowpanes. The original owner, Thomas Curtis Clarke (1827-1901) was associate engineer and secretary of the Port Hope, Lindsay and Beaverton Railway, and later advisor for the Harbour Board at the reconstruction of the harbor in the 1850’s. His wife Susan Harriet Smith (1837-1909) was a daughter of John David Smith (1786-1849) who built the Bluestone (21 Dorset Street East), and granddaughter of Port Hope founder, Elias Smith.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
175 Dorset Street West – David Smart House (The Hillcrest) – c. 1870 – This house is the only example of “Beaux Arts” architecture in Port Hope. An addition to the house was made around 1900 which consists of the large Jeffersonian portico on the north. This massive two and a half-story structure is held by fluted columns with large Corinthian capitals, the main original portion of the house is hipped roof section with two polygonal wings at each end. This section sports beautiful Palladian dormers, bracketed eaves and a grand verandah. The house was built for David Smart, a barrister and notary public who married Emily A. Worts of Gooderham and Worts Distilleries of Toronto. Smart became a director of that distillery.

Port Hope, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

Port Hope, Ontario Book 1

Port Hope is a heritage community situated on the north shore of Lake Ontario in Northumberland County and offers both an urban and rural paradise with the perfect combination of heritage charm, modern vibrancy and cultural allure. The Ganaraska River runs through the heart of town past historic buildings.

The Township was opened in 1792 and named in honor of Colonel Henry Hope, a member of the Legislative Council of Canada.

Before Canada became a nation in 1867, Port Hope was already a boom town. Its main streets were thronged with horse-drawn carriages and farmers’ wagons, its plank sidewalks crowded with shoppers and merchandise. Wood-burning locomotives pulled heavily loaded trains through town on their way to a harbor filled with schooners and steamships. Solid brick commercial blocks and houses lined the streets.

The town grew rapidly from four families of English descent who arrived by boat in 1793 and settled at the river mouth. Until then the area had been home to aboriginal groups—Huron, then Iroquois, and finally Mississauga—attracted by the salmon and sturgeon that swarmed in its river.

The first European settlers came from the new United States. They had chosen to follow the British crown after the American Revolution. So had Elias Smith, a Montreal merchant who, with two partners, Jonathan and Abraham Walton, financed their arrival. In return for settling forty families on the land and building a sawmill and flour mill to serve them, the partners received a grant of land roughly the size of modern urban Port Hope.

More families arrived including blacksmiths, carpenters, bricklayers, and merchants. The mills drew farmers from fifty and sixty kilometers away. Grain that could not be milled was bought by distilleries—there were eventually five along the river—that produced a famous Port Hope whisky. Its most rapid growth began when railways revolutionized travel in what is now Ontario. In 1856 the Grand Trunk Railway connected Port Hope to Toronto and the Atlantic seaboard. Its viaduct over the Ganaraska River was the second greatest engineering challenge on the route, exceeded only by bridging the St. Lawrence River at Montreal.

Another railway heading north from Port Hope opened up the vast timberlands and new farms of central Ontario and stretched to Peterborough and Lindsay. Eventually it reached Georgian Bay, at Midland. Down this line came great loads of timber and grain. Some went east to England, but most was exported to the USA through Rochester across the lake.

Walton Street was named after Captain Jonathan Walton who brought the first settlers here. The Walton and Smith families were among the original petitioners for land grants and figured very prominently in the Town’s history. Port Hope was incorporated as a police village in 1834.

Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
56 Queen Street – c. 1851-53 – The Town Hall has a center entrance with a round-headed fan-lighted transom on its seven-bay pilastered front. The building was designed in the Neo-Classical style. The central octagonal cupola has alternating four-paned, heavily mullioned transomed windows, and clock faces with Roman numerals. Louvered panels are separated by small slender Roman Doric colonettes.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
28 Bedford Street – This large 2½ story four bay brick house is built in the Romanesque Revival style with a large irregular plan, heavy masonry, steeply pitched roof, tall chimneys, recessed porch, and oriel windows. The imposing entrance way is composed of a shingled pediment and round arches of corbelled and stepped brick with decorative panels on either side of corbelled brick.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
42 Bedford Street – c. 1860 – mid-Victorian style – two storeys high with a hipped roof with extended eaves; wood band decoration below the cornice; transom and sidelights around front door; collared polygonal posts on the full-width veranda
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
One Walton Street – The Waddell Hotel – c. 1845 – This three-story brick ell-shaped commercial block with residential space above fronts to Walton and Mill Streets. Its handsome facades include stone columns, pilasters and lintels at the ground floor level, rusticated stone quoins, eared wood window surrounds with cornices to architraves at the second floor, and a simpler treatment with wood surrounds to openings on the third story. The roof is gabled and turning the corner forms a hip. The Ganaraska River originally divided into two streams around the present Walton Street Bridge and the area where this building stands was an island. When the river was re-channeled the entire Mill Street area was built up from marsh and became another access route to the harbor. In 1844, Robert Needham Waddell had this prominent corner block constructed.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
29-33 Walton Street – c. 1845 – It is a brick commercial building with residential and/or storage space above. The corner is rounded to Queen and Walton Streets, and the block stands three storys high. A pilastered front of Greek Revival style is topped by a heavy wooden frieze and cornice. The frieze is pierced by stomachers, and the soffit contains mutules and guttae, characteristic of Greek Revival. There are six bays to the Walton Street facade, including one on the rounded corner, and six bays to the Queen Street facade. The windows on the second and third storys are headed by a plain lintel and supported by lugsills on the third story and a continuous sill, acting as a string course on the second story.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
81 Walton Street – The Walton Hotel, formerly known as the Queen’s Hotel, was built in 1870. A story was added in 1876 and in 1907, a story was also added on the south end of the building. As it stands today, the Walton Hotel is a three-story brick building on the southeast corner of the intersection of John and Walton Streets. The Walton Street facade is divided in three sections by brick pilasters that carry through the ornamental brick cornice. The narrower central panel contains parted round-headed windows on the third floor surmounted by an ornamental name panel. Below is a round-headed window. Both side panels are identical on the second and third floors and contain paired windows with segmental heads and two-tier brick labels. The upper windows have individual sills whereas the second-floor ones share a continuous sill. An intricate brick cornice extends along the Walton Street facade as well as along John Street. The Walton Street corner of the building is rounded.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
114-116 Walton Street – Russell Block – c. 1875 – This block is a three-story Second Empire brick building, four bays wide with a false mansard roof. The second story bays have semi-circular structural openings with decorative cast iron lintels. The third story bays are twin semi-circular bays separated by narrow columns and featuring decorative brick lintels. The facade of the block is pilastered from the second story to about one and a half feet above the third story bays. There are two large pilasters on either end topped with decorative brick capitals. The facade has a machicolated brick cornice with recessed panels below the wooden cornice of the roof. Henry C. Russell (1834-1911) was a cabinetmaker and furniture dealer.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
Walton Street – Italianate style – iron cresting above bay windows and entrance, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
160 Walton Street – Andrews Newman House – c. 1852 – This two-story, rectangular, brick-veneered house with medium-pitched roof with a flat center deck has three bays to both storys on the main facade. The windows have plain lintels and lugsills and are shuttered on the second story. A verandah runs across the front of the house, supported by turned wooden supports and decorative barge board. The door has a flat transom and sidelights. The larger front windows on the ground floor with recessed door case with sidelights and transom indicate this building may have started out as an Ontario Cottage. The first story windows are wider than the second story, and the lugsills narrower than those of the second story. Joseph Newman (1813-1859) was originally from Ireland, having arrived in Port Hope about 1838 or perhaps earlier. He was a baker, grocer and dealer in country produce with a shop on Walton Street.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
162 Walton Street – c. 1888 – George Hooker House – Built originally as a two-story shop and dwelling, this square house is constructed of brick laid in stretcher bond and has a medium-pitched hipped roof with a flat deck and plain-boxed cornice. On the east wall, where the main door is located, there are three bays on both storys. The windows have segmental heads with radiating brick arches, painted lugsills, and well-fitting shutters. A porch with five supporting columns is located off-center on the east wall.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
186-184 Walton Street – Williams Duplex- c. 1875 – This is a duplex, standing two-storys high with a gable roof. The composition is enhanced by a gabled “frontispiece”, which projects slightly from the facade. This in turn is graced by a bay window (at ground level), complete with cornice and brackets. At second-floor level, the “frontispiece” bears two windows. All the bays are segmentally arched, except the louvered attic vent, which is round arched.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
202 Walton Street – c. 1850 – McDougall Smart House – It is a vernacular house with an interesting main facade. The roof has a parapet gable roof trim, and it has no overhang where it slopes down on the north and south sides. Four single chimneys, two on either side of the gable peak, emerge from the parapet trim. The main facade has six openings: there are three equally spaced windows on the second floor, and directly below are two more windows and the new front door with its single sash transom above. There are four pilasters; just below the roof line, some brick dentations decorate the wall’s surface. Around the back door there is a small inner closed porch composed of panels of wood and glass divided by chamfered strappings. A large porch extends over this and down to the road. It has an elevated concrete floor on which stands four columns: these columns are square-based and have beveled edges. They are crowned with simple capitals, and from these, decorative supports and small brackets extend up to the roof.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
236 Walton Street – 7 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms – 3,500-5,000 square feet – 2½-story tower with mansard roof, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
238 Walton Street – semi-circular radiating fan window in the gable above the porch, sidelights, transom
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
240 Walton Street – 3-story tower with mansard roof, iron cresting, cornice brackets spindles and decorative porch supports

Cobourg, Ontario Book 5 in Colour Photos – My Top 8 Picks

Cobourg, Ontario Book 5

Cobourg is a town in Southern Ontario ninety-five kilometers (59 miles) east of Toronto and 62 kilometers (39 miles) east of Oshawa. It is located along Highway 401. To the south, Cobourg borders Lake Ontario.

Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
166 James Street East – 1880s – two-story rectangular house with a side wing – chipped gable
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
120 University Avenue East – Victoria College – 1832 – Edward Crane, architect and builder. This is in the Greek Revival style and was built as the Academy of the Methodist Church and became one of Canada’s earliest degree-granting universities in 1841. Egerton Ryerson, a prominent educator and founder of the Ontario public school system, was its first President. After forming a vital part of the Town’s academic and cultural life for over fifty years, Victoria College was persuaded to relocate to Toronto in 1892 and today remains affiliated with the University of Toronto.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
10 Chapel Street – c. 1841 – This house has Georgian features – balanced facade, medium-pitched roof, and robust end chimneys. Its rather heavy and severe doorway, with its single panel, is characteristic of the Greek Revival style.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
428 John Street – Built by William Hargraft, a prosperous hardware merchant in Cobourg who became Mayor and member of the Provincial Government. Second Empire Style with front tower.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
18 Spencer Street East – Known as ‘The Poplars’. The Spencers, Beattys and Daintrys who lived here were closely associated with the history and development of Cobourg and were connected to well-known Canadian families including the Ryersons. Early Ontario Regency Architecture
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
50 Havelock Street — c. 1851. Residence of R.D. Chatterton who was the first editor of the Cobourg Star, Canada’s oldest continually published newspaper.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
77 Havelock Street – 1876 – This square house was built as a wedding present from the bride’s parents for Alfred Reynar, professor of English literature at Victoria College, and his bride Ida Hayden. The double main door is enhanced by a curved transom and narrow sidelights. The bay windows have stained glass transoms above each of the three narrow, mullioned window panes; there is bracketing under the eaves.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
80 Havelock Street – c. 1875 – William Bond, a contractor and builder, built this Victorian house with elaborate stone quoins, and stone lintels with worked keystone over each window. The second story center window is a mock French door, a counterpoint to the main door. Professor Bain of Victoria College was its first owner.

Cobourg, Ontario Book 4 in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Cobourg, Ontario Book 4

Cobourg is a town in Southern Ontario ninety-five kilometers (59 miles) east of Toronto and 62 kilometers (39 miles) east of Oshawa. It is located along Highway 401. To the south, Cobourg borders Lake Ontario.

Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
80 University Avenue West – Ontario Vernacular house – The gable apex is ornately decorated by gingerbread, under the eaves are paired brackets and a decorated frieze. There is a large wooden medallion in the center gable.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
250 Mathew Street – c. 1850 – This Ontario Cottage was built by Mathew Williams. Substantial over-hanging eaves of the hipped roof give it a hat-like quality. This form of roof was unique to the Cobourg area. It has a lovely doorway.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
258 Mathew Street – c. 1840. -This clapboard saltbox house is stylishly finished with returning eaves and elaborate end boards. It has a splendid doorway.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
100 James Street West – sidelights and transom around front door, dormer in attic
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
96 James Street West – dormer, circular window
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
78 James Street West – two-story bay window with pediment
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
James Street West – pediment above Doric pillars
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
453 Division Street – c. 1880s – Samuel Clark, a merchant in Cobourg, bought this house from shoemaker John Sherman in 1884. Clapboard siding and barge board are the distinguishing features. There is a Gothic window in the small gable.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
410 Division Street – 1890-1900 – George Stanton House – Queen Anne element
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
420 Division Street – 1835 – Georgian – Residence of George Perry, son of Ebenezer Perry, Chairman of the Board of Police, the first governing body of the Town. It is in Regency style with its contrasting window sizes on the first and second floors, sweeping galleries, low hip roof, and tall chimneys. It is now Woodlawn Inn.

Cobourg, Ontario Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Cobourg, Ontario Book 3

Cobourg is a town in Southern Ontario ninety-five kilometers (59 miles) east of Toronto and 62 kilometers (39 miles) east of Oshawa. It is located along Highway 401. To the south, Cobourg borders Lake Ontario.

Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
155 Durham Street – verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
181 Bagot Street – built by Hugh Harper in the 1870s – barge board and finial in the gable, sidelights and transom, pediment supported by porch pillars
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
163 Bagot Street – Gothic – iron cresting above bay window
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
121 Bagot Street – Gothic Revival
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
106 Bagot Street – c. 1850 – This Greek Revival cottage was built by William H. Floyd. Constructed of brick, it has simple clean lines, with good returning eaves and a plain cornice. The off-center doorway is a unique example of the extent to which the Greek Revival could go in elaborate detail.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
93 Bagot Street – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
990 Ontario Street – The Mill Restaurant – In 1836, Asa Burnham, a Cobourg pioneer, sold his property at Elgin and Ontario Streets to Ebenezer Perry, a United Empire Loyalist, a veteran of the War of 1812. Perry’s Mill was constructed of stone; it was destroyed in a fire and rebuilt of brick in the 1850s with some stone work around the entrance. In 1870, Mr. Poe added a plaster mill which required schooner loads of stone to be brought in for grinding. He also continued to run the flouring mill. By 1889 the Pratt family owned the mill and continued there until 1986. Alexander Pratt owned a flour and seed store in Cobourg and leased the flour mills in Baltimore. His interests in the mill began in May 1883 when the Cobourg Flour Milling Company was converting the old grindstone mill into the more efficient device known as the roller mill.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
181 Ontario Street – 1844 – second story added later – truncated hip roof, front French door with sidelights
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
163 Ontario Street – 1843 – built by one of the four Burnet brothers – front porch added in 1862 – the ornamented entablature of the porch is supported by two large square pillars and an elaborate frieze with a central crest at the top.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
120 Ontario Street – stone
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
110 Ontario Street – 1878 – “Illahee Lodge” – Italianate – built by John Jeffrey, hardware merchant – bay windows, front porch crowned with intricate wrought iron railing
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
173 Tremaine Street – “Mount Fortune” 1844 – This Greek Revival home at one time served as an officers’ mess for the Cobourg Cavalry Regiment. The porch treillage and molded brick cornice are note-worthy. It was owned in the 1860s by James Fortune, one-time sheriff of the District.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
202 Green Street – Hatfield Hall – 1879 – High Victorian Gothic – It was built by retired Civil War Colonel Chambliss, Managing Director of the Cobourg and Marmora Railway and Mining Company. His heiress wife, Sallie, was the daughter of George K. Schoenberger who largely financed the railroad company. In 1890, Colonel Douglass Cornell of Buffalo bought the house for a summer residence and called it Hadfield Hurst (Hadfield was his wife’s maiden name). From 1929 to 1951, it was a girls’ private school, Hatfield Hall, named after the house where the future Queen Elizabeth I was confined by her sister Queen Mary I. The windows all have transom lights at the top. On the west facade is a third-floor balcony covered with a hip roof and gable with decorative fretwork.

Cobourg, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Cobourg, Ontario Book 2

Cobourg is a town in Southern Ontario ninety-five kilometers (59 miles) east of Toronto and 62 kilometers (39 miles) east of Oshawa. It is located along Highway 401. To the south, Cobourg borders Lake Ontario.

James Cockburn, born in England, moved to Montreal with his family in 1832. In 1845 he came to Cobourg to practice law and, until 1849, shared a practice with D’Arcy Boulton, another prominent politician. Married in 1854 to Isabella Susan Patterson, Cockburn began raising a family and found interest in public affairs. He was elected to the Cobourg town council in 1856, 1858 and 1859. During this time, when plans for Victoria Hall floundered due to lack of finances, Cockburn offered the leadership which saw the project completed in 1860. While serving in local politics Cockburn acquired a reputation for honesty, fair dealing, integrity and sound logic. He was one of the Fathers of Confederation.

Cobourg retains its small-town atmosphere, in part due to the downtown and surrounding residential area’s status as a Heritage Conservation District.

Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
202 Church Street – 1878 – The Mulholland and McArthur House – Italianate Villa style – built by Robert Mulholland – asymmetrical ‘L’ plan with a short square tower crowned by an iron urn; at the base of the tower is a paneled doorway. The beaded string course, ornate roof cornice, pediments and iron cresting above the bay window, and barge board on the eave emphasize the sense of gaiety. The pale red bricks of the house are complimented by white arched window and door moldings.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
184 Church Street – 1888 – The Albert House – Victoria Cottage built by William Beer and rented to summer visitors. Two storeys, gable roof, the windows are two-over-two and double hung, aluminum siding. The veranda is the full front of the facade, has a shed roof, with balcony above.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
356 Walton Street – c. 1876 – ‘Sunny Brae’ was built by Nathaniel Burwash, a teacher at Victoria College who later became its president, in a Vernacular style. The front gable and porch, added circa 1905, gave it more charm. Another teacher, Albert Odell, bought the house in 1900. Albert and his brother John were both teachers who became school inspectors, and both had married sisters, the daughters of a local merchant. When Albert’s wife died in 1904 John and his family moved in with his brother. When war broke out ten years later, John enlisted at the age of 48. He had been the commanding officer of the Cobourg Heavy Battery, a militia regiment, which became part of the 2nd Heavy Battery, Canadian Field Artillery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Odell’s command. This battery arrived in France in September of 1915 and returned home in May of 1919.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
332 Henry Street – c. 1856 – This well -proportioned Victorian house shows Regency influence in its three-bay facade and hipped roof but also has a Gothic-style gable with an attic window. It was built for Andrew Hewson, an Irish immigrant who operated a successful dry goods and millinery store in town. He and his wife had six children, and their daughter, Charlotte, and her husband, Deputy-Sheriff David McNaughton, lived with them for many years. Their only son, Edmund Hewson McNaughton, was killed at Bully-Grenay, France, while serving with the Cobourg Heavy Battery. On August 9, 1918, an enemy shell hit a storage shed containing 9 artillery shells and 5 tons of cordite. A 9.2 Howitzer gun was destroyed and 26-year old McNaughton and two other Cobourg young men were killed.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
303 Henry Street – c. 1882 – Vernacular with Gothic elements – verge board trim, bay windows
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
273 College Street – Matthew Hobart, a Cobourg cabinet maker, had this stucco house built about 1858 in the Classic Revival style. Sidelights, double-hung windows two up two down on the gabled facade, cornice return on gable
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
306 College Street – 1857 – The decorative pattern of two-colored brick work is the outstanding feature of this house, built in Georgian Loyalist style for a local merchant, Lazarus Payne. Members of the Payne family lived here for over seventy years.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
320 College Street – bay window with iron cresting above, sidelights and transom windows
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
394 College Street – oriel window with dormer above
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
314 George Street – The MacNachtan Home – 1876 – red-brick Italianate house with contrasting window and door heads in buff brick, a circular window in the gable, paired cornice brackets, verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
474 George Street – built by Thomas Dumble in 1871 – Gothic – elaborate front porch added about 1890
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
77 Albert Street – King George Inn
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
34 Buck Street – gambrel-roofed dormer with balcony

Cobourg, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Cobourg, Ontario Book 1

Cobourg is a town in Southern Ontario ninety-five kilometers (59 miles) east of Toronto and 62 kilometers (39 miles) east of Oshawa. It is located along Highway 401. To the south, Cobourg borders Lake Ontario.

The settlements that make up today’s Cobourg were founded by United Empire Loyalists in 1798. The Town was originally a group of smaller villages such as Amherst and Hardscrabble, which were later named Hamilton. In 1808 it became the district town for the Newcastle District. It was renamed Cobourg in 1818, in recognition of the marriage of Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales to Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (who later become King of Belgium).

By the 1830s Cobourg had become a regional center, much due to its fine harbor on Lake Ontario. In 1835 the Upper Canada Academy was established in Cobourg by Egerton Ryerson and the Wesleyan Conference of Bishops. On July 1, 1837, Cobourg was officially incorporated as a town. In 1841 the Upper Canada Academy’s name was changed to Victoria College. In 1842 Victoria College was granted powers to confer degrees.

Cobourg retains its small-town atmosphere, in part due to the downtown and surrounding residential area’s status as a Heritage Conservation District. The downtown is a well-preserved example of a traditional small-town main street. Victoria Hall, the town hall completed in 1860, is a National Historic Site of Canada. The oldest building in the town is now open as the Sifton-Cook Heritage Centre and operated by the Cobourg Museum Foundation.

Food processing is the largest industry in Cobourg, and it is home to SABIC Innovative Plastics and Weetabix.

Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
55 King Street West – Victoria Hall – 1860 – It is in the Palladian Neo-Classical architectural style with Corinthian capitals on the fluted columns and pilasters decorating the facade. The building is topped with a massive clock tower with Corinthian columns. On the first floor is a courtroom, and a concert hall on the second floor. Standing at the heart of the downtown is Victoria Hall, a building that now serves as the town hall, as well as home of the Art Gallery of Northumberland, the Cobourg Concert Hall, and an Old-Bailey-style courtroom that is now used as the Council chamber. Victoria Hall is a landmark known for its impressive stone work. Charles Thomas (1820-1867), an English-born master stone carver and building contractor, executed the fine stone carvings, including the bearded faced keystone over the main entrance into the building. Victoria Hall was officially opened in 1860 by the Prince of Wales, later to become King Edward VII of the United Kingdom.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
177 King Street West – c. 1848 – Greek revival style town house with exterior corner blocks of wood dressed to resemble stone, cornice return on gable, sidelights and transom, engaged columns
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
193 King Street West – c. 1891 – cornice brackets, shutters
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
295 King Street West – c. 1847-48 – This is a Vernacular Ontario Cottage and only cut stone house in Cobourg; it was built by Alexander Sutherland and was the home of the Delanty family for many years.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
317 King Street West – c. 1850 – 1½ story, center hall plan, wood house sheathed in stucco, verge board trim and finial
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
327 King Street West – c. 1840s – 1½ story house with Gothic Revival elements – Birthplace and boyhood home of Father Francis P. Duffy, WWI Chaplain of the 69th New York Regiment, Rainbow Division, U.S. Army
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
540 King Street East – Gothic – verge board trim, corner quoins, bay window, drip molds with keystones
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
411 King Street East – Built in 1857 for Henry Mason, a director of Cobourg Railway. Architect was Kivas Tully. It is in the High Italianate architectural style with Corinthian capitals on the two story high columns, a second-floor porch with railing, dentil molding under the eaves, oriel window.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
390 King Street East – c. 1878 – Brookside Youth Centre – pediment with decorated tympanum above two-story veranda supported by Ionic pillars; dentil molding on cornice; lower level veranda has Doric pillars.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
214 King Street East – c. 1891 – Home of George Armour, son of Chief Justice of Canada (John Armour), from 1910 to 1930s. Queen Anne Style with irregular plan
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
170 King Street East – c. 1840. This residence in the Georgian style was built by Joseph Townsend, and later owned by John Crease Boswell, Cobourg postmaster.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
160 King Street East – “New Hall”, 1913. English Cottage style of architecture. It was built by Senator Clive Pringle, whose wife was the daughter of Madame Albertini, proprietress of the Arlington Hotel.
Architectural Photos, Cobourg, Ontario
7 Fitzhugh Lane – Ravensworth, a waterfront mansion with four bedrooms and four bathrooms, built circa 1897 on Lake Ontario for a distinguished Union officer in the American Civil War. The Colonial Revival-style house sits on 3½ acres at the eastern edge of Cobourg. It is built to symmetrical Georgian proportions and embellished with Greek columns, an imposing portico and a large sun room with lake views. In the 19th century the town was known as resort for American steel magnates from Pittsburgh and other centers of the industrial United States. Among those barons traveling north to survey their iron mines near Marmora were members of Emma Shoenberger Fitzhugh’s family. She had married a military man thought to be the youngest general in the American Civil War. Many years after the war ended, Brigadier-General Charles L. Fitzhugh commissioned Ravensworth as a summer estate on 50 acres. Brigadier-General Fitzhugh looked to his roots in an old Virginia family and modeled the new summer getaway on an ancestral plantation house near Fairfax, Virginia.

Grafton and Bolton, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Grafton and Bolton, Ontario

The Township of Alnwick/Haldimand is located in central Ontario in Northumberland County, situated between Lake Ontario and Rice Lake. It was formed in 2001 by the merger of Alnwick Township in the north and Haldimand Township in the south.

Alnwick Township was originally surveyed in 1795 when twenty-four lots were laid out on the first concession. It was named for Alnwick in Northumberland, England. The township’s first residents were made up of United Empire Loyalists, attracted by large unencumbered land grants, sometimes in the thousands of acres. In 1835, 3,600 acres of land along the first and second concessions were set aside as an Indian settlement. Shortly after, the Indian Band from Grape Island was moved into this settlement and a school and church were built at Alderville. The first council meeting was held in 1845 at Alderville School. The Alnwick/Haldimand Township building located in Grafton was built in 1858. Prior to its construction, Township Council meetings were held at local taverns or the residences of council members.

Haldimand Township was formed in 1791 and was named in honor of Sir Frederick Haldimand – a British general who served as Governor-in-Chief of Canada between 1778 and 1796. By 1804, there were 356 settlers in Haldimand Township making it the second most populous township in the region after Hamilton Township to the West. The town hall was constructed in 1860.

As part of provincial initiatives in the late 1990s, the Government of Ontario pursued a policy of municipal amalgamations to reduce waste and duplication. Alnwick Township and Haldimand Township became a single Township of Alnwick/Haldimand on January 1, 2001.

Alnwick/Haldimand is part of the Oak Ridges Moraine. Thirty-one square kilometers of the Cobourg Creek watershed runs through the Township. The Creek supports a diverse ecosystem including forests, meadows and wetlands. Numerous species inhabit the Creek including brown trout, rainbow trout, scuplins and darters. Migratory Chinook Salmon spawn in the creek and Atlantic Salmon are being stocked as part of a provincial initiative to return these native fish to Lake Ontario. The Ganaraska Forest is an 11,000-acre forest located in the Township. It is one of the largest blocks of forested land in southern Ontario. The Millvalley Hills Forest is a 297-hectare forest located within the Township. The dominant trees species are red and white pine, and red and white oak. The township is rural based with agriculture being the largest contributor to the economy. Grain, cash crops, milk, livestock, vineyards and apple farming are all viable in the area. Grafton is located in this township.

The first known settlers to Grafton were just before the turn of the 19th century. These earliest settlers were all from the new United States of America. Most were looking for new land and opportunities, a few were second generation United Empire Loyalists born in loyalist settlements further east.

New settlers from the British Isles started arriving twenty years later. These early Grafton settlers, as well as clearing agricultural land from the forests, produced many fine political leaders. David Rogers was the first to propose anti-slavery legislation for Upper Canada, and Henry Ruttan was the Speaker of the Legislature. Likely the hamlet was named Grafton after John Grover’s birth town of Grafton, Massachusetts. He initially arrived in Upper Canada in 1798 and was in Grafton by 1804.

Bolton is a community in the town of Caledon, located in the Region of Peel about fifty kilometers northwest of Toronto. The downtown and area that historically defined the village is in a valley, through which the Humber River flows. The town was founded around 1822 when James Bolton helped build a flour mill for his relative George Bolton. It was established on the line of the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway with stages to and from Weston.

In the Humber River valley, George Bolton, newly arrived from England, and his uncle, James, an area pioneer from just after the completion of the 1819 survey, built a grist mill at a bend in the river on land George had purchased from the surveyor, William Chewett. This mill became the catalyst for several other enterprises which became the seed of a hamlet. The village was strongly Reform during the Mackenzie years and James Bolton had to seek refuge in the U.S.A. after the failed rebellion of 1837. In 1842, his son James C. Bolton purchased the mill site from his uncle and built a large flour mill at the site of the current Humberlea Road, as well as a sawmill. The flour mill, in place until 1968, prospered under several prominent mill owners following Bolton including John Guardhouse and Andrew McFall, both of whose homes still survive along King Street East. The village continued to expand driven by water-powered industries such as William Dick’s Agricultural Works.

 While most evidence of the original mills and other industries have disappeared, the nineteenth century residential fabric remain largely intact and enough survives of the late nineteenth commercial core to maintain the sense of the historic village. As it now stands, the area is characterized by the polychromatic brickwork of the second half of the 19th century in local brick with many of the finer homes incorporating a gabled ‘L’ plan with a veranda at the inside corner.

Sandhill Ontario is about 9 miles east of Caledon.

Abraham Campbell’s father and six brothers took up one thousand acres in Chingacousy about 1820, after having journeyed from the old family home in Lincoln County by an ox-team. From Cooksville to their locations, the way led over a road made through the bush with their own axes. Mr. Campbell spent his life on the farm on which he was born when Chingacousy was the farthest settlement north of the lake. A quarter of a century later Campbell’s Cross, on the highway connecting north and south, was a scene of bustling life. There was a tavern there with eighteen rooms. There were three stores in the village at that time. As many as one hundred teams from the North Country would arrive with grain in a single day. Part of the grain was bought by local merchants and teamed by them to Port Credit for shipment by water. Some of the farmers hauled their own grain all the way to the lake port.

Architectural Photos, Grafton, Ontario
160 Old Danforth Road, Grafton – Old Foundry House – This house was originally a cabin built around the same time as the barn and was probably for the foundry manager. For a few years it was the rectory for St. Mary’s Church before the current rectory, on the hill above the church, was built.
Architectural Photos, Grafton, Ontario
154 Old Danforth Road, Grafton – The Reuben Lawless House was built in 1870 and is mid-Victorian of the Italianate Vernacular, with “gingerbread”. It has a stone/ rubble foundation and cedar siding and is of a balloon structure. The back “extension” was a woodshed/ summer kitchen built over the original well. In 1897 Thomas Lawless became the property owner and in 1900 Reuben Lawless Senior gained title. For years it was known as the Reuben Lawless House and stayed in the Lawless family until 1970.
Architectural Photos, Grafton, Ontario
135 Old Danforth Road, Grafton – Old Presbyterian Sunday School was built in 1884. For many years it served as the Grafton Library. Architecturally it is notable for its patterned dichromatic brick work. There is a strong transom band, quoins and a foundation band topping a squared stone foundation, typically the work of Scottish masons.
Architectural Photos, Grafton, Ontario
10830 County Road 2, Grafton – Grafton Village Inn was built in 1833 to replace a log building. The Neo-Classical building was restored in the early 1990s bringing it back to the early appearance that greeted travelers approaching from Kingston, York or Grafton Harbor. Its distinctive features include the front door surround with carved oak leaves and acorns, the second-floor Venetian window and the demi-lune windows at each gable end. The western wing was a later addition and at one time housed the telephone exchange.
Architectural Photos, Grafton, Ontario
10715 Highway #2, Grafton – John and Mary Steele (nee Spalding) House is a handsome Georgian structure built by Thomas Spalding for his daughter Mary and her husband John Steele of Colborne. They moved here in 1843. The front door surround has several Neo-Classical features. Sections of the original brick are laid in Flemish bond. Over the years, deteriorating brick has been plastered over, painted and then stenciled to resemble brick.
Architectural Photos, Grafton, Ontario
10568 County Road 2, Grafton – Barnum House (National Heritage Site of Canada) – The Barnum House was built between 1817 and 1819 by Eliakim Barnum, a United Empire Loyalist originally from Vermont. The house which stands just outside Grafton is the earliest example of Neo-Classical architecture in Canada. Barnum House was the first house museum to open in Ontario, restored and operated by the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario in 1940. In designing his house, Eliakim Barnum was influenced by American Architecture, popular in New England states at the beginning of the nineteenth century. This Neo-Classical style was intended to reproduce elements of classical Greek architecture. These include a central temple front with flanking wings, articulation of the facade with pilaster linked by elliptical arches, and extensive use of delicately scaled details. The Neo-Classical elements of the house’s exterior are echoed in the ornate woodwork of several interior rooms.
Architectural Photos, Bolton, Ontario
25 Nancy Street, Bolton – Alice Goodfellow House – circa 1884 – This 1½ story Victorian Gothic home was built by George Watson for Alice Goodfellow using local red and yellow brick. The end gable patterning and the enclosed front porch are excellent examples of late nineteenth century urban architecture. Alice’s sister Margaret Smith lived next door. On Alice’s death in 1901, her brother-in-law Albion farmer James Goodfellow and his wife Marion retired here. It was in their family until the owner of 31 Nancy Street purchased it in 1999.
Architectural Photos, Bolton, Ontario
31 Nancy Street – George Smith House – circa 1877 – This Italianate style home was built by George Watson for Margaret and George Smith. The red and yellow bricks were locally made and its exterior architectural features and beautiful enclosed porches are original. Smith, a sign painter and letterer, sat on the first village Council and was noted for his very realistic interior faux-wood graining. Erie Smith Schaefer inherited the house in 1933, living here with her husband Alex of ‘Smith & Schaefer’ Hardware. This dichromatic brick house is in the Italianate style. The orientation of the ‘L’ plan with the enclosed verandah along the south is distinctive. The bracketed eaves, segmentally arched windows and low medium pitch hipped roof are all typical of the Italianate.
Architectural Photos, Bolton, Ontario
34 Temperance Street – Shore-Nease House – circa 1872 – This Victorian Gothic house was built by Henry Shore using red and yellow brick in a style typical of an urban village setting. The trillium patterned fretwork on the decorated wooden porch has been repeated on adjacent buildings. From 1892-1969, it served as office and surgery to Bolton doctors, including Dr. Lepper, Dr. A. Jackson, Dr. Graham and Dr. Taylor. The building is a fine example of a polychromatic brick ‘L’ plan residence featuring a diamond pattern at the gable of each section with accents of quoins and arches, and an ‘L’ form verandah formed at the inside corner between the two sections.
Architectural Photos, Bolton, Ontario
12 King Street West – ‘The Castle’ – mid-1870s – A rare example of the Second Empire style with its mansard roof and square projecting bay, this house was built for Ann Roberts. Ownership passed to her son William L. Roberts in 1893 and from him to Margaret Jane Osburn in 1907. Olga and Wesley Strong and their son Charlie lived here until 1923 when Wes’s health failed. Charlie lived to 100 and was a great Bolton story teller. Mrs. Dickson owned the house in the 1930s and left it to her daughter Pearl who raised eight children here with her husband Lee Morrison.
Architectural Photos, Bolton, Ontario
74 King Street East – Cabinet Maker’s House – circa 1846 – William Hughes, age 22, built this two-story, Neo-Classical style house. The saw mill down the street supplied the materials. It remains the earliest frame house standing in Bolton. Hughes, who specialized in cabinetry and chair making, lived in it with wife Jane and family until 1884. It then housed mill workers until Sarah Lundy and Harry Sheardown bought it in 1891, living in it for 43 years. Harry first worked in Dick’s Foundry, later owned a barber shop on Queen Street North and was considered one of Canada’s best all-round athletes.

Colborne, Ontario and Area in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Colborne, Ontario and Area

Cramahe Township was established in 1792. Joseph Abbott Keeler, son of the first settler of Cramahe Township, founded the village of Colborne in 1815 when he opened the first store and post office. He had the village surveyed, laid out the public square and donated the land.

Joseph Keeler (1770-1839) was the first settler who landed on the shores of Cramahe Township with forty United Empire Loyalist families from Rutland, Vermont. Keeler, his son Joseph Abbott Keeler (1788-1855) and his grandson Joseph Keeler (1824-1881) were instrumental in establishing the settlements at Lakeport, Colborne and Castleton.

A store established in Colborne in about 1819 by Joseph Keeler provided the nucleus around which a small community began to develop. Within ten years, a distillery and a blacksmith’s shop had been erected. Colborne was named after Lieutenant Governor Sir John Colborne. With the establishment of a harbor nearby for the shipment of lumber and grain, Colborne prospered. By 1846, it contained a foundry, a pottery, six stores, three churches, tradesmen and artisans, and about four hundred residents. The arrival of the Grand Trunk Railway in 1856, spurred further growth.

In 2001, Colborne and Cramahe Township were amalgamated as part of municipal restructuring to form an expanded Township of Cramahe.

Colborne is the home of the Big Apple, a tourist attraction located along Highway 401. The Big Apple is 10.7 meters (35 feet) tall and has a diameter of 11.6 meters (38 feet) – the largest apple in the world. There is an observation deck on top of the apple, and adjacent to it is a restaurant and a store to buy all your apple treats.

King City is the largest community in King Township in York Region north of Toronto. In 1836, a settlement styled Springhill was established in King. With the arrival of the Ontario, Simcoe and Huron Railway in 1853, the settlement began to expand. In 1890, the reeve of King Township James Whiting Crossley incorporated King City by merging the hamlets of Springhill, Kinghorn, Laskay, and Eversley. King City is characterized by rolling hills and clustered temperate forests. Many lakes and ponds dot the area. Creeks and streams from King City, the surrounding area, and as far west as Bolton and as far east as Stouffville are the origin for the East Humber River.

The King Township Museum in King City is a local history museum for the township of King at 2920 King Road. The museum consists of a building which houses the majority of collections held. This building was originally built in 1861 as the site of the Kinghorn School SS #23. It was updated and expanded in 1958 and again in 1963, and purchased by the township in 1978. The King Township Historical Society established the museum in 1979 and opened it in 1982.

The village of Nobleton is located in southwestern King Township and is surrounded by hills and forests. It was named after Joseph Noble and began as a settlement in about 1812. Most of the early settlers came from England, Scotland and Ireland. There are many horse farms here. The Humber River flows through the town. Nobleton was first settled in 1812, primarily based on its location midway between King City and Bolton on the east–west route, and Kleinburg and Schomberg on the north–south route. Taverns and hotels were built to serve travelers, and general stores and a post office were built to serve the fledgling businesses.

Colborne, Ontario
The Big Apple
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
5 Toronto Street – three-story tower, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
65 King Street East – dormers, two-story open verandah
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
King Street East – paired cornice brackets, second floor balcony, sidelights and transom on front entrance
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
9 Church Street East – In 1820, Joseph Abbott Keeler built this beautiful Neo-Classical house.
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
5 Church Street East – two-story tower-like bay, second floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
3 Church Street East – hipped roof, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
8 Victory Street – During the reign of Queen Anne (1702-1714) an architectural style was born and it enjoyed a revival, particularly in the New World, in the latter part of the 19th century. 8 Victory Lane (as it was then known) is a fine example of this style of architecture. It is characterized by fine brickwork in warm, soft finished tones, terracotta panels and crisply painted white woodwork.
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
3 King Street West – c. 1820 – Reputed to be among the oldest dwellings in Colborne, this was the home of Scottish immigrant John Steele and his wife Mary Spalding from 1831-1843. There is reason to believe the house predates 1820. Steele, a founder of Queen’s University held many other posts such as magistrate, newspaper editor, Board of Education trustee, member of literacy and agricultural societies etc. In 1843, the Steeles moved to Grafton and sold 3 King Street West to Cuthbert Cumming, a Hudson’s Bay trader. He sold it in 1858 to the Scougale family, local dry goods merchants, whose business was in the building next door. The Thorntons, part of the Scougale family, lived here for nine years of the Scougale clan’s 101-year occupancy.
Architectural Photos, Colborne, Ontario
7 King Street West – c. 1830 – In 1846, Cuthbert Cumming and his wife Jane McMurray, acquired a portion of this two-acre property, and the balance in 1852. Cumming was born in Scotland and after working in the Canadian west and Quebec, he retired as a Chief Trader for the Hudson Bay Company. He remained in Colborne for many years, listed in the census records as “a gentleman” until his demise in 1870. The front elevation of this classic Regency Cottage with its low profile and deep roof overhang hides a secret. There are actually five levels, including a stone basement that housed the kitchen and servants in the mid-19th century.
Architectural Photos, Nobleton, Ontario
6012 King Road, Nobleton – Hambly House – c. 1884 – It was originally built of logs but was rebuilt after a fire at the corner of Highway 27 and King Road.