Woodstock, Ontario Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Woodstock, Ontario Book 3

Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
415 Hunter Street – 1892 – County Court House – Richardsonian Romanesque style -2½ story, rose sandstone with white sandstone lintels and drip molding, steep pitch irregular slate roof, wall dormers with parapet walls topped with finial, semi-circular windows above double hung windows, recessed double doors, framed with Roman arch, supported by pillars, two pillars have carved monkey heads, 2,2 story semi-circular bay windows, large stone newel posts flank stairs, towers, turrets and elaborate chimneys, Centenary stone mounted in the central buttress
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
445 Hunter Street – Public Library – built in 1909 – Beaux-Arts Classicism style – brick, stucco on details such as quoins, columns, portico, Corinthian order columns with flutes, formed metal cornice, flat roof, Carnegie library
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
410 Hunter Street – Neo-Classical Revival – Central Public School – built in 1880 – two story with usable attic, deep wood eaves with decorated brackets, parapet with broken cornice above main entrance, first floor window ellipse and double hung, second floor semi-circular, double front door with ellipse transom, name of school in stone above doorway on second floor, decorated trunked chimneys with corbel bricking, three entrances – boys, girls and teachers lead to large spacious halls, all reached by steps
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
39 Vansittart Avenue – 1880 – Harry H. Powell, President Woodstock Gas and Light Company – Italianate – two story, painted brick, some bricks have paw prints, hip roof, decorative dentils between paired brackets, one-story bay window, decorative shutters, off-centered door, turned posts, sunburst spindles, turned balusters, L shape verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
81 Vansittart Avenue – Colonial Revival – symmetrical two story with attic, dull red brick, gable roof has a pair of dormers separated by triangular window, stone sills and lintels, centered door with segmental top flanked with side lights and ellipse transom, oriel 4-over-4 windows supported with paired thick brackets
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
84 Vansittart Avenue – It was built in 1864 by Mr. Thomas H. Parker, a prominent merchant and first president of the Board of Trade in 1877. Mr. Parker was Mayor of Woodstock in 1878 and 1879. In 1911, Mr. M. W. Rowell was leader of the Ontario Liberal Party and resided here during his term as provincial member for Oxford. Italianate villa – two story with attic, white brick, low pitch gable roof, deep eaves supported by paired brackets, windows grouped, first floor 2-over-2 flat, second floor 1-over-1 flat, decorative wooden lintels, sills supported with brackets, semi-circular windows on second floor, door in tower, segmental transom, hood supports balcony, Doric columns support side verandah, squared off-centered tower has hip roof ending in decorative finial
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
114 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1888 – Queen Anne – 1½ story, red brick, painted blue shingles on gables, gable roof, decorated cantilever brackets on gables, one-story bay window, second floor semi-circular window, off-centered door, sturdy brick pillars support L shape verandah, cantilever brackets
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
122 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1885 – Italianate, Edwardian – two story, red brick, decorative brick string course, hip roof, dentils with paired brackets on corners, off-centered door, stained glass transom, sturdy brick pillars support verandah, decorative string course, corbel bricking on chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
123 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1860s – Neo-classical – two story, trunked hip roof, single brackets, 9-over-9 flat windows, off-centered door flanked by side lights and rectangular transom, turned posts and spindles and balusters support verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
133 Vansittart Avenue – Gothic Revival – 1½ story, white brick, steep pitched gable roof with decorative paired exposed rafters, Gothic wall dormers and roof ends decorated with finials, flat windows grouped, centered door, rectangular transom, decorative shutters, paired square pillars support open verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
140 Vansittart Avenue – Tudor Revival style – 1½ story, stucco/timber in gables, salt box roof and gable roof at rear with gable wall dormer, multi-lights in grouped casement windows, off-centered door
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
209 Vansittart Avenue – Vernacular – two story with apartments in attic, steep gable roof, south window has diamond lights with lead muntins, pediment verandah is half open and half closed with shingle sides and wood piers
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
210 Vansittart Avenue – built in 1895 by Thomas Leopold “Carbide” Wilson, inventor of the first commercial calcium-carbide process for the manufacturer of acetylene gas. It was the residence of the Sisters of St. Joseph’s until 1975. It is a voluptuous two-story house with finished attic of irregular shape in Richardsonian Romanesque style using contrasting brick, cut stone and hanging tiles – stone main floor, red brick second floor; steep red slate roof, red tiles in gable end and small casement windows, several balconies, large shed roof verandah, brick posts, turned balusters, lattice skirt, a porte-cochere for people to be protected from weather when leaving buggy or cars, off-set tower
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
487 Princess Street – This house was constructed by Ralph Bickerton, carpenter and builder, as his family home in 1881. His sons, William John, Robert George, and James Graham, established in 1885 the nationally-known Bickerton Brothers Harness and Saddlery business. Italianate, Neo-classical – symmetrical full two story, red brick, dichromatic brick accent, trunked hip roof, decorative pediment above entrance, paired brackets on wide cornice with dentils, decorative shutters, centered door with etched glass transom, Doric columns support classical pediment roof

Woodstock, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Woodstock, Ontario Book 2

Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
10 Wellington Street South – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, pillared verandah supports, dentil molding on verandah cornice, spindles on verandah surround
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
45 Wellington Street South – c. 1853 – L shape, 1½ story, white brick, gable roof, has delicate verge board with central pendant post, 2-over-2 windows on second floor, 1-over-1 rectangular window in pairs on main floor, shutters, one-story bay, bell roof over door with a rectangular transom
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
57 Wellington Street South – Edwardian, Ionic capitals on verandah pillar supports
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
62 Wellington Street South – c. 1874 – Italianate – L shape two-story, white brick with decorative quoins, trunked hip roof, deep eaves with wide cornice, dentils, smaller paired brackets and larger single brackets, paired chimneys, 2/2 segmental windows, one-story bay window, door has segmental transom protected with roof supported on large brackets
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
95 Wellington Street South – c. 1853 – Neo-classical – square, symmetrical full two-story, buff brick, hip roof, 3-over-3 bays, 2-over-2 rectangular double hung windows, decorative aluminum shutters
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
36 Wellington Street North – c. 1854 -Queen Anne – full two-story with attic, red brick, gable roof, two hip roofs with dormers, two-story bay window with gable roof, verge board with pendant posts and large brackets, porch and balcony have turned posts, spindles, lattice and brick-a-brac, string course is patterned brickwork, six-sided two-story tower with steep hip roof topped with finial, paired post support gable roof side porch
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
82 Wellington Street North – The Neo-Classical designed house and coach house were built for the family of Jennet (McDonald) and Homer Pratt Brown in 1860. In 1844 Brown became a partner with the Woodstock Foundry (515 Dundas Street). Brown was a member of town council, Mayor in 1861 and County Treasurer for many years. The sills and supporting lintels were metal and made at Brown’s foundry. Since Brown was an active member of the Masonic Lodge there is an emblem of the Eastern Star, as a window, found in the pediment above the front door. The squared, paired, Doric pillars frame the front porch which shelters a rectangular transom and side lights which are divided into many rectangular lights. Decorative brackets in pairs add symmetry to the design. Each window has a decorative lintel; above the second-story front hall window, there is a larger stone lintel with an English Rose on each side of acanthus leaves; small brackets of acanthus leaves support the lintel.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
419 Drew Street – c. 1886 – Edwardian, Tudor Revival – two story with attic, red brick, filled in balcony in half timber, patterned grey slate gable roof, projecting eaves with thick cornice, variety of styled windows, large semi-circular window in upper floor with brick headings, keystones, centered door protected by open large brick piers, porch with closed balcony, 2 rows of dog tooth string course, brick lintels, decorative brickwork on chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
405 Drew Street – c. 1891 – T. McClay, builder – Romanesque – large two story with attic, red brick, trunked grey slate hip roof with painted green wooden shingles in gables, projecting eaves, curved corners with brackets, front gables, center square tower supported by Roman arch is topped by a finial, four arched windows in tower, triptych window, large semi-elliptical shape window on main floor, flat 1/1 double hung stained glass window on upper floor, flat 1/1 double hung windows are topped with stained glass, center door is found beneath arches of tower, ellipse stained glass transom, open side porch with turned wooden balusters; decorative, horizontal parallel brick lines on both floors; corbel bricks cornice edge of tower and chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
376 Drew Street – c. 1852 – Edwardian – L shape two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof with one gable dormer and one gable both with green painted shingles in a pattern, gable end has Palladian window with decorated cornice in apex, center door is protected by square piers, open porch
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
321 Drew Street – c. 1860 – Ontario Vernacular – 1½ story, buff brick, front gable roof, decorative verge board, string course, drip molding and decorative corbel bricking frame, semi-circular 1/1 windows, small square colored glass in front windows, side porch with turned posts, spindles and brackets, flat roof with shingle skirt protects closed and open porch, slat skirt
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
315 Drew Street –c. 1855 – Queen Anne – two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof, oriel roof on side of house, gable roof above two story bay window, decorative dentils, triangular window in gable, top light stained glass, hip roof on open balcony supported by Doric pillars, closed verandah with gable roof on porch with Doric columns, corbel bricking on chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
385 Brant Street – The dwelling was built about 1890 for Thomas A. McCleneghan, Deputy Postmaster and son of Alex R. McCleneghan (81 Perry Street) who was Postmaster. The dwelling is of the Regency style, 1½ stories, low hip roof and cottage appearance. The center door, flanked by large square windows, is typical of this style. The front entrance is flanked by three windows topped with an ellipse shape segmented head window. On the front porch, the ellipse and square designs are repeated in the lattice work. The brick work features beautiful brick work in the drip molding and chimney. Other details include a rectangular patterned verge board, an iron-crested bay window accented with a pair of finals and a continually repeated pattern or rectangular patterns in windows and brickwork. The McCleneghan family were active in the business and social life of Woodstock and contributed greatly to the development of the city. It remained in that family until about 1920 when it was sold to Robert S. Bickle, President and Founder of the Bickle Fire Engine Ltd. Mr. Robert S. Bickle was a pioneer in the manufacture of fire trucks and firefighting apparatus in Canada. His company prospered and provided equipment of the highest standard to industries and municipalities throughout the country. As the business expanded it became allied with the Seagrave Company of Columbus Ohio, becoming known as Bickle-Seagrave Ltd. and later King-Seagrave Ltd. Mr. R. S. Bickle was succeeded by his nephew, V.B. King. The company further expanded to include King Trailers Ltd. and also Truck Engineering Ltd. In 1954, it was purchased by Herbert Webster, Field man for the Ontario Co-operative Milk Producers.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
543 Henry Street – Canadian National Railway Station – built 1880 – now VIA – gables with verge board trim, corner quoins, fretwork with trefoil cut outs

Woodstock, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Woodstock, Ontario Book 1

Woodstock is located in the heart of South Western Ontario, at the junction of highways 401 and 403, 50 kilometers east of London and 60 kilometers west of Kitchener. Woodstock is the largest municipality in Oxford County, a county known for its rich farmland, and for its dairy and cash crop farming. As well as being “The Dairy Capital of Canada”, Woodstock also has a large industrial base, much of which is related to the auto manufacturing industry.

In 1792, Sir John Graves Simcoe became Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada and made plans for the development of the interior of Upper Canada. He envisioned a series of town sites linked by a military road and a system of rivers and canals, providing inland access during an era when commerce and settlements depended on major waterways. London, Chatham, Dorchester and Oxford were designated town sites with London as the defensible capital. The military road stretching from Burlington Bay through Woodstock to London provided an overland supply route for the safe movement of troops and settlers. Simcoe named this road Dundas Street after Henry Dundas, Viscount Melville, Secretary of State for War and the Colonies.

To speed development in the sparsely populated interior of the province, Simcoe granted whole townships to land companies who were obligated to bring in settlers. Simcoe passed through the area now known as Woodstock and noted it a suitable “Town Plot” and settlement began here in 1800.

In the 1830s, a different group of immigrants were encouraged to settle in Oxford to ensure this community’s loyalty to the British crown. British naval and army officers placed on half-pay looked to the colonies for a new career at the conclusion of military service. The first to arrive was Alexander Whalley Light, a retired colonel who came to Oxford County in 1831. He was joined by Philip Graham in 1832, a retired captain of the Royal Navy, and Captain Andrew Drew, on half-pay from the Royal Navy, arrived in Woodstock to make preparations for his superior, Rear-Admiral Henry Vansittart, also on half-pay. Half-pay officers went to considerable lengths to clear their chosen parcels of land.

Admiral Vansittart commissioned Colonel Andrew Drew to build a church (Old St. Paul’s) in a new area of Oxford that was known as the “Town Plot”. The men later quarreled, which led to the construction of a second church known as “New St. Paul’s”.

Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
73 Wilson Street – Italianate/Second Empire – type of mansard roof with dormers, paired cornice brackets, bay window, window hoods
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
50-52 Wilson Street – 1856 – Italianate – symmetrical two story, red brick on face, yellow brick on sides, double unit, trunked hip roof with five-sided roof over second story bay, doors have segmental transoms
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
500 Dundas Street – the current City Hall was constructed of pink sandstone in 1901 as a post office; for over one hundred years it has been the center of the municipal and social life of Woodstock. The corner tower has four clocks. It housed the local government and served as lecture hall, opera house, and assize court. It is basically eighteenth-century Palladian architecture.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
723 Dundas Street – Old St. Paul’s Church – 1834 – The red-brick church was designed in the Gothic Revival style – lancet windows, dichromatic brickwork. The front elevation has a classically-inspired cornice return, a semi-circular transom over the main entrance door with a brick pediment and pilasters. The tower has a hexagonal cupola with louvered, pointed-arch openings. The base of the cupola is decorated with a dentil trim and bracketed cornice. The low-pitched, timber-frame roof is an example of construction methods used during the 1830s. Old St. Paul’s was closed in 1879 (when New St. Paul’s opened) but re-opened to serve the Anglican community in 1882.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
Finkle Street – The Oxford Hotel, located across from Market Square and the Town Hall in Woodstock was built in 1880 as “The O’Neill House” in Romanesque style. It saw guests such as Oscar Wilde and Reginald Birchall.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
39 Victoria Street – c. 1877 – Neo-Classical cottage – 1½ story, buff brick, hip roof, dormer, wooden lintels and brackets support window sills, wood shutters, three-panel double door on storm porch
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
45 Victoria Street – c. 1854 – Italianate, two-story buff brick with red brick quoins, trunked hip roof with Neo-Classical pediment above the front entrance; wide cornice with small brackets ending with larger paired brackets at the corners
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
447 Buller Street – Colonial Revival – 1½ story red brick and white siding, symmetrical, gambrel roof, large three-light shed roof dormer, center door has side lights
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
445 Buller Street – fretwork, oval window in main gable, round window in small gable
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
467 Buller Street – c. 1848 – Italianate – full 2 story, white brick, single unit, asphalt shingles, hip roof, projecting eaves with single brackets, segmental shape windows, a one-story bay window is topped with twin windows on second floor, off-centered door has semi-elliptical transom, small porch roof protects this area, shutters on windows across front of house
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
126 Graham Street – c. 1860 – Second Empire – symmetrical three-story white brick, mansard roof, dentils, decorative cornice with large brackets, two-story bay windows flank entrance, decorated cut stone lintels, rough faced stone lintels second floor, dormers have decorative wooden frames, large front door is flanked by transom and side lights, an open portico protects the entrance – now Park Place Retirement Centre

Tillsonburg, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 12 Picks

Tillsonburg, Ontario

Tillsonburg is a town in Oxford County located about fifty kilometers southeast of London on Highway 3 at the junction of Highway 19 which connects to Highway 401.

The area was settled in 1825 by George Tillson and other immigrants from Massachusetts. A forge and sawmill were erected and roads built which led to the establishment of a settlement on the Big Otter Creek originally called Dereham Forge.

In 1836 the village was renamed Tillsonburg in honor of its founder. It was also in this year that the main street, Broadway, was laid out to its full 100-foot (30 meter) width. Because the village was predominantly a logging and wood product center, the street width was to accommodate the turning of three-team logging wagons. This width has become a benefit toward handling the pressures of modern-day traffic by providing angled parking. The extension of Broadway north was called Plank Line and is now known as Highway 19.

The water system supplied pure water for domestic use, and provided water power to such industries as a sawmill, planing mill, grist mill, spinning mill, pottery and a tannery. Many of these new establishments were owned, started, or financed by George Tillson.

In 1915, a Public Library was built with funds provided by the Carnegie Foundation, and the town’s Memorial Hospital was constructed in 1925. In the 1920s, major enterprises included milk production, manufacture of shoes, tractors, textiles and tobacco.

Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
38 Ridout Street West – Casa di Luca Restaurant – Queen Anne style, verge board trim on gable, turret
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
59 Ridout Street – Italianate – paired cornice brackets, bay window, voussoirs and keystones, transom window
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
65 Bidwell Street – Queen Anne – turret, wraparound veranda
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
Bidwell Street – Edwardian, Palladian window
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
140 Bidwell Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
299 Broadway Street – two-story bay windows, cornice brackets, verge board trim
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
295 Broadway Street – two-story high Ionic pillars
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
276 Broadway Street – Queen Anne, turret
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
300 Broadway Street – verge board trim
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
30 Tillson Avenue – Annandale National Historic Site – Constructed in seven years in the 1880s, this was the farm house for E.D. Tillson’s 600-acre Model Farm. The interior of the house exemplifies the Victorian style of design known as the “Aesthetic Art Movement” which was popularized by Oscar Wilde, and encouraged the use of color and decorative detailing. There are hand-painted ceilings, elaborate inlaid floors, ornate mantles, and stained glass throughout.
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
64 Oxford Street – Seven Gables Bed & Breakfast – steeply pitched gables, Palladian windows, wraparound veranda
Architectural Photos, Tillsonburg, Ontario
60 Brock Street West – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roofs, wraparound veranda

Drumbo and Blandford Blenheim Township, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 18 Picks

Drumbo and Blandford Blenheim Township

Drumbo acquired its name in 1852; the community was named after Drumbo, Ireland. It is located in Blandford-Blenheim Township, Oxford County at the crossroads of County Road #3 (Wilmot Street) and County Road #29 (Oxford Street); this is south of the 401 Highway and 24 kilometers northeast of Woodstock.

Princeton is located in Oxford County on Country Road #3, twenty-two kilometers east of Woodstock. Etonia, east of Princeton, and Gobles, west of Princeton, are both located on County Road 2. Richwood is located on Blenheim Road and Township Road 5, north of Etonia.

The village of Wolverton is named after its founder, Enos Wolverton (1810-1893), who built up a successful milling enterprise on the Nith River. Enos came to Upper Canada with his parents from Cayuga County, New York state in 1826. He married Harriet Towl in 1834 and had two daughters, Roseltha (Rose) and Melissa (Lissa), and five sons, Alfred, Daniel, Alonzo, Jasper and Newton. Enos’ brother, Asa Wolverton, became a successful businessman in nearby Paris, Ontario. The Crimean War (1854-1856) brought on an agricultural boom in Upper Canada and increased the Wolvertons’ fortunes.

Washington is on County Road 3 (Washington Road) and Regional Road 8, east of Plattsville and north of Drumbo.

Plattsville is located on Township Road 13 & 42 (Albert Street) and Regional Road 8. It is located north of Highway 401, and 32 kilometers northeast of Woodstock. The community was named for its founder, Edward Platt, who settled in 1811 and built a flour mill.

Bright is located where County Roads 22 and 8 cross. Windfall is located on Oxford Road 29, north of Highway 401, west of Drumbo, south of Bright.

Ratho is located on Blandford Road and Township Road 13, northwest of Bright.

Architectural Photos, Drumbo, Ontario
Drumbo – Yellow brick, Ionic pillars supporting an upper balcony, decorative trim on gable, dentil molding
Architectural Photos, Drumbo, Ontario
Drumbo – Italianate – cornice brackets, two-storey veranda
Architectural Photos, Drumbo, Ontario
Drumbo – #15 – Italianate – verge board trim on gable, pediment
Architectural Photos, Drumbo, Ontario
Drumbo – 23 Oxford Street – Prominent brackets on the cornice (roof overhang), triangular pediment above with a Palladian type triple window in the tympanum with the center window flanked by two lower windows
Architectural Photos, Drumbo, Ontario
Drumbo – c. 1880 – wraparound two-story veranda, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Princeton, Ontario
Princeton – Neo-Classical style – hip roof, cornice brackets, semi-circular balcony above front door with sidelights and transom
Architectural Photos, Princeton, Ontario
Princeton – #30 – Italianate – hip roof, paired cornice brackets, bric-a-brac on veranda
Architectural Photos, Princeton, Ontario
Princeton – Gothic Revival style with gingerbread verge board and finial
Architectural Photos, Princeton, Ontario
Princeton – #12 – Italianate, cornice brackets, corner quoins
Architectural Photos, Princeton, Ontario
Princeton – #48 – Gothic Revival Regency Cottage
Architectural Photos, Wolverton, Ontario
Wolverton – Gothic, verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Wolverton, Ontario
Wolverton – About 1855, Enos Wolverton built an impressive new three storey family home with a cupola which came to be known as Wolverton Hall – Regency style
Architectural Photos, Washington, Ontario
Washington – Gothic Revival stone cottage
Architectural Photos, Plattsville, Ontario
Plattsville – #32 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, second floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Plattsville, Ontario
Plattsville – #4 – Italianate, cornice brackets, two-story bay window
Architectural Photos, Plattsville, Ontario
Plattsville – 66 Albert Street – 3-story, Second Empire style with dormers
Architectural Photos, Ratho, Ontario
Ratho – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Ratho, Ontario
Ratho – wraparound veranda

Strathroy, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Strathroy, Ontario

Strathroy-Caradoc is located west of the City of London.

After the War of 1812, the British government encouraged thousands of people from Britain to come to Southwestern Ontario. There were three main reasons for this:
1. The British were afraid that Americans would invade through the Sydenham River area again as they had at Baldoon. If there were settlements in the area, the settlers could warn the British and fight against the Americans.
2. In England, the end of the war meant that many soldiers were out of work. They were starving and homeless. In Ireland, landlords had mismanaged the lands, which led to the Potato Famine. Since potatoes were the main source of income and food, thousands of Irish were starving. In Scotland, landlords chose to graze sheep in the Highlands, and they forced the Scottish Highlanders to leave. In an effort to help these people, the British government began to give away land in Upper Canada.

3. Soldiers of the War of 1812 and the war with France expected land rewards from the King of England; there was no land left in Britain to give them. Land in Upper Canada was given away instead.

Land along the Sydenham River was sparsely settled, the land was fertile and flat which made it easier to clear. The river gave settlers fresh water, and power for their water mills. It could also be used as a highway to move goods to Detroit, where they could be sold. A new road had been built between London and Goderich, which made it easier to get to the Sydenham River by land.

When the government gave away land, there were often conditions the new owner had to live up to, including building roads, mills, and armies, but often, it meant inviting immigrants from Britain to live on their land. For example, a settler might receive 20 000 acres of land, but would be forced to give away 5,000 to other settlers. They would be expected to organize how the immigrants would get to the new settlement, what they would do when they arrived (such as raise sheep, beef or cotton), and help them settle in by building churches and schools. This is how settlements and villages were created along the Sydenham river.

In 1830 James Buchanan, the British Consul at New York City, acquired a tract of 1,200 acres of unsettled land in Adelaide Township. His son, John Stewart, settled there and built a sawmill and gristmill on the Sydenham River. These pioneer industries formed the nucleus of a settlement which was named Strathroy means “Red Valley” in Gaelic, and is named after James Buchanan’s birthplace in County Tyrone, Ireland. The construction of a branch line of the Great Western Railway through Strathroy in 1856 stimulated the growth of the community. The line was eventually connected to Michigan at Windsor, providing the farmers of Strathroy with an extra market for their produce.

Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
7 Kittridge Avenue West – Queen Anne – turret
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
418 Victoria Street – Italianate – paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
52 Frank Street – Town Hall – 1928 – reminiscent of a New England style of architecture combining beauty and utility
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
51 Front Street West – Founded by William McMaster just before the Confederation of Canada in 1867, the Canadian Bank of Commerce quickly became the dominant financial institution in the country. In 1883, this building on the corner of Frank and Front Streets, was constructed. It features a Doric inspired front with vertical pillars in the Classical Greek style.
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
97-99 Front Street – uneven roof line, second-floor balconies
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
145 Front Street – Gothic – corner quoins, shutters
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
153 Front Street – Italianate, 2½-story frontispiece, paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
189 Front Street – decorative verge board on center gable, paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
230 Albert Street – two-story tower-like bay windows, paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Strathroy, Ontario
144 Albert Street – Queen Anne style – turret

Cheltenham and Terra Cotta, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 12 Picks

Cheltenham and Terra Cotta, Ontario

Cheltenham – In 1816 Charles and Martha Haines and three children left England for New York; the following year they arrived in York, Upper Canada, where Charles, a millwright, built mills. In 1819, the Chinguacousy Township survey was completed and Haines purchased 100 acres along the Credit River with a mill site west of Creditview Road. The Haines family settled in what he named ‘Cheltenham’ after his birthplace. It is located north-west of Brampton.

In 1827 he built a grist mill, dammed the river and chiseled mill stones. In 1842, Frederick Haines, the second son, built Cheltenham’s first store. In 1845, the first tavern was built and run by C. Spence. In 1847, to meet demand, Haines built a larger mill with three runs of stone, and he constructed a saw mill on the south side of the river. In 1848, William Henry built an Inn. In 1850,the first blacksmith shop was built. In 1852, Cheltenham post office opened with William Allan as first postmaster. By 1853, Cheltenham had three hotels.

In the 1860s, the commercial core expanded with the addition of four shoe stores, a saddlery, and two cabinet makers. In 1874, the Hamilton & Northwestern Railway arrived north of the village (later became CNR). In 1877, the Credit Valley Railway arrived about one kilometer east of the village, accessed by Station Road. In the 1870s, Kee’s steam tannery was started and two distilleries produced ‘Cheltenham Wheat Whisky’. In 1887, fire destroyed a major block of buildings; rebuilding began. In 1914, Interprovincial Brick Company opened a plant just west of the village center.

In 1822, Joseph Kenny was awarded a Crown Grant in Chinguacousy Township of 100 acres along the Credit River on which much of Terra Cotta now sits. It is located south of Cheltenham. In 1857, Henry Tucker purchased 40 acres from Kenny to build grist and saw mills powered by a dam and mill race on the Credit River. Simon Plewes bought the mills in 1859 and the hamlet became known as Plewes Mills.

By the time a church, the Wesleyan Methodist Church, was built in 1862 the village had been renamed Salmonville for the annual spawning frenzy. A post office opened in 1866 and by 1874 there were thirty-four surveyed lots in the hamlet on the banks of the Credit River.

This early community spread westwards and straddled the boundary of Chinguacousy and Esquesing townships. This divided the village schoolchildren, their two schoolhouses being in opposite directions. By 1873 the village had acquired telegraph facilities, two sawmills and a grist mill, and in 1877 the Hamilton & Northwestern Railway arrived, stimulating local industry and farm exports.

Industry began with brickworks exploiting the local red clay, and by 1891 the post office was renamed Terra Cotta. In the 1930s, the brickworks became victims of the Depression and only a kiln chimney remains. Quarries east of Terra Cotta were established in the 1840s and the arrival of the railway broadened their market reach, allowing local sandstone to be used as far away as Ottawa in the Parliament Buildings.

In the 1940s, community enterprise expanded into recreation. The river’s abundant water resources were used to develop Clancy’s Ranch as a weekend resort, expanded in 1949 into Terra Cotta Playground, and purchased in 1958 by Credit Valley Conservation.

Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
14376 Creditview Road, Cheltenham – Frederick Haines House – circa 1887 -After losing his first home to the 1887 fire, entrepreneur Frederick Haines, son of Cheltenham’s founder, built this red brick house with intricate yellow brick patterning. Later additions are compatible with the original three gable Victorian Gothic style. In the 1940s-1950s, it became a United Church rest and holiday home. It later housed an antique shop before being converted back to a private residence. It has a bell cast roof over each front bay, an arched entry and etched glass transom and sidelights of the central entrance.
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
14411 Creditview Road, Cheltenham – King Store/Residence – circa 1870s -This Victorian Gothic general store/residence was built for Charles King, a Cheltenham merchant. In the 1880s, it became the Harris General Store with John and MaryAnn Harris living in the residence. Postmaster Albert Kee purchased it in 1928, removed the store portion and ran the post office here until 1931. His widow, Ada Louise Kee, took over as postmistress until she retired in 1958. There are cornice brackets on the eaves and there is a double Gothic window above the front bay window.
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
14396 Creditview Road, Cheltenham – Henry’s Hotel – circa 1887 – William Henry’s pre-1859 Inn was destroyed in the 1887 fire. He rebuilt, replacing the Inn with this two-storey Georgian style frame building with hip roof and brick veneer. He named it ‘Henry’s Hotel’ operating it until his death in 1904. Thomas and Nathaniel Browne took it over as ‘Browne’s Hotel’. It was later a butcher shop with home above. In 1958 it was adapted to commercial/apartment use.
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
14387 Creditview Road, Cheltenham – Claridge House – circa 1915 – This ‘four-square’ frame house is built in the Edwardian Classical style characterized by an asymmetrical floor plan, pyramidal hipped roof and large attic dormers. The partially enclosed verandah has a roof slope that matches that of house roof above. The original owner was a carpenter.
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
14377 Creditview Road, Cheltenham – Neo-Classical Cottage – late 1850s -This 1½ storey frame cottage was likely built by John Lyons. It was sold soon after to Thomas Mercer who lived here for the next 20 years. The covered verandah with its hip roof has a banister running from both sides to the central entrance/steps along with a decorative frieze under the eaves.
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
1499 Mill Street, Cheltenham – Horatio Haines Cottage – circa 1847-1851 -This 1½ storey, timber frame Georgian style cottage is unique with its identical front and rear facades, providing views to the grist and saw mills across the river and to the developing village core. Haines family members were its builders, carpenters, lumber suppliers and intended occupants, the first being Horatio Haines, miller and fifth son of Charles and Martha Haines. Horatio died in 1856, aged 32 and it was later sold to his brother Frederick.
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
Mill Street, Cheltenham – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Cheltenham, Ontario
14409 Creditview Road, Cheltenham – Beaver Hall – circa 1884 – This 1½ storey timber frame building was built by store owner John Harris, who rented it out to the community for political meetings, concerts and dances until the mid-1930s. Built into the hillside, it has a substantial stone foundation with an 1884 date-stone in the front wall. The main floor is supported with large squared timber beams visible in the unfinished basement ceiling. About 1900, a cement tile business operated from the back of the hall.
Architectural Photos, Terra Cotta, Ontario
King Street, Terra Cotta – Gothic Ontario Cottage
Architectural Photos, Terra Cotta, Ontario
396 King Street, Terra Cotta – The Grange – 400 m east of High Street – This building has evolved from John McComb’s 1840s squared timber cottage. In 1867 George Campbell and his brother William modified it into a two-family stone dwelling. It was inherited by George Campbell’s daughters in 1887 and later sold to Edward and Janet Little in whose hands it evolved into this elegant residence.
Architectural Photos, Terra Cotta, Ontario
49 Isabella Street, Terra Cotta – Stringer House – circa 1870s – This 1½ story Victorian Gothic house was originally a frame cottage later veneered in the red and yellow brick produced locally by Terra Cotta Pressed Brick. The projecting front bay has yellow brick detailing.
Architectural Photos, Boston Mills, Ontario
Boston Mills Road – log cabin

Belfountain and Inglewood, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Belfountain and Inglewood

Caledon is a town in the Regional Municipality of Peel in the Greater Toronto Area. Caledon remains primarily rural. It consists of an amalgamation of a number of urban areas, villages, and hamlets; its major urban center is Bolton on its eastern side adjacent to York Region.

Caledon is one of three municipalities of Peel Region. The town is just northwest of the city of Brampton. In 1973 Caledon acquired more territory when Chinguacousy dissolved with most sections north of Mayfield Road (excluding Snelgrove) transferred to the township.

Some of the smaller communities in the town include: Alton, Belfountain, Boston Mills, Caledon, Caledon Village, Campbell’s Cross, Cheltenham, Inglewood, Mono Mills, Sandhill, Terra Cotta, and Victoria. The region is very sparsely populated with farms.

By 1869, Belfountain was a picturesque village in the Township of Caledon County Peel on the Forks of the Credit Road on the Credit River. There were stagecoaches to Erin and Georgetown.

After the survey of Caledon Township was completed in 1819, pioneers such as the Grahams, McColls, McCannells, Martins, Whites and McGregors settled in the area around present day Inglewood. They cleared the land, sharing common problems and interests.

In 1843, on the nearby Credit River, Thomas Corbett built a dam and dug a mill race to provide water power to run the Riverdale Woolen Mill. David Graham became a partner in the mill in 1860, and after a fire, reconstructed it in stone in 1871. By this time, Graham was Corbett’s son-in-law. The mill attracted potential employees and their families to the area. Early settlers discovered deposits of sandstone and dolomite nearby on the Niagara Escarpment. Joachim Hagerman opened a quarry in 1875, the first of many.

The Hamilton & Northwestern Railway arrived in 1877 and was crossed over by the Credit Valley Railway in 1878. The railways provided cheap and easily accessible transportation, for both locally quarried stone and manufactured goods of the woolen mill. A general store and railway hotel were soon built.

The village housing built in this period, much of it by Graham, reflected the Ontario Cottage form popular in that Victorian era.  Most houses were built using local lumber from the William Thompson Planing Mill, a more affordable option than brick. These cottages usually featured a front verandah, a center door symmetrically flanked by windows and a steep roof line with a front center gable surrounding a Gothic or arched window, the basic elements of the Victorian Gothic style. In Inglewood, most homes were left unadorned, a style referred to locally as Rural or Carpenter’s Gothic.

The increase in population gave rise to many small industries, and from the mid-1880s until 1910, Inglewood’s commercial growth included several general stores, a blacksmith, a livery and wagon maker’s shop, a butcher shop, a bakery, a general hardware and tinsmith business, a barber shop, glove factory, post office, library, and a branch office of the Northern Crown Bank.

Architectural Photos, Belfountain, Ontario
Bush Street, Belfountain – John Drury, schoolteacher 1905-1937 – Gothic, verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Belfountain, Ontario
758 Bush Street – Belfountain General Store and Café – 1888 – dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Belfountain, Ontario
Old Main Street, Belfountain – It’s Roxies boutique – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Belfountain, Ontario
804 Forks of the Credit Road, Belfountain – verge board trim and finial on gable
Architectural Photos, Belfountain, Ontario
Belfountain – Log cabin
Architectural Photos, Belfountain, Ontario
Belfountain – Two-story bay window in gable, one-story bay to left of door
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
15666 McLaughlin Road, Inglewood – General Store – c. 1910
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
15641 McLaughlin Road, Inglewood – Northern Crown Bank – mid 1880s – Ontario Cottage with decorative Victorian Gothic trim details
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
McLaughlin Road, Inglewood – verge board trim on gable with finial, corner quoins, dormer
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
15640 McLaughlin Road, Inglewood – Caledon Hills Cycling – Victorian Gothic style building was Inglewood’s first general store stocking all that was needed by the community in daily produce and dry goods.
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
15612 McLaughlin Road, Inglewood – General Store – 1886 – George Merry built this red brick, hip roofed general store and located a bake-oven at the rear. Note the date stone, brick facade, paired brackets and the verandah’s decorative spool-work trim.
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
74 McKenzie Street, Inglewood – Victorian – c. 1890s – Ella Trought and Herb Spratt were given this 1½ story frame house for their marriage in 1916 and lived here for over 50 years. Herb and his brother Harold ran the hardware store their father Arthur had operated.
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
53 McKenzie Street, Inglewood – Mill Worker’ Cottage – mid 1880s – This 1½ story frame Ontario Cottage is built with a center entry, steep center gable and Gothic window in a style known locally as Rural Gothic or Carpenter’s Gothic. In 1905, Jacob Sithes purchased the house from mill owner David Graham.
Architectural Photos, Inglewood, Ontario
20 Lorne Street, Inglewood – Henry Sithe House – c. 1912 – This ‘four square’ house is built in the Edwardian Classical style characterized by an asymmetric floor plan, pyramidal hipped roof, large attic dormer and a full verandah; it has heavy limestone window lintels and sills. It was built for Annie Puckering and Henry Sithe, who was a railway foreman.

Port Hope, Ontario Book 4 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Port Hope, Ontario Book 4

Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
57-59 King Street – Charles Clemes Duplex – c. 1876 – This semi-detached brick house is in the Second Empire style. Its colossal three-story scale is more impressive because of the semi-detached arrangement, symmetrically divided. Both halves of the composition contain a complex array of detail. The distinguishing elements are the steeply pitched mansard roof in cedar-shingles, and the gabled dormers with eaves returns and molded pilasters framed around segmentally-arched windows. A third facade dormer, centrally placed, boasts slender lights and is topped with a bracketed pediment. The facade has two-story bay windows trimmed with band courses and decorative panels in brick; dentilled cornice and paired brackets; slender windows with original glazing intact, some flat arched, some with segmental arches, some round headed; twin entrances with prominent arched transoms and paneled double doors.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
8 King Street – Robert Mitchell House – c. 1850 – This one-and-a-half story Gothic cottage has three bays to the ground floor, and is constructed of brick laid in Flemish bond with a coarse rubble foundation. The steep pitch of the gable roof, and the three steeply pointed gables containing pointed windows are distinguishing Gothic characteristics. The French doors on the ground floor and the front door with sidelights and ogre transom are typical of the Regency style. On the gable ends of the house are returned eaves. The porch in front of the main entrance, with its carved detail is a later addition. Robert Mitchell (1799-1865) was a carpenter. Originally from Ireland, he arrived in Port Hope in the early 1830s. As an active member of the early Methodist congregation, he along with builder Phillip Fox constructed the first frame Methodist Church located on Brown Street in 1833 (on a lot across the street from the present church.) His brother, William Mitchell (1799-1871), who was also a carpenter, resided in a dwelling a few doors to the south of Robert’s house. Robert’s children established businesses in Port Hope and were prominent merchants.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
20 King Street – John Read House – c. 1870 – This two-story house is clad in brick laid in an unusual pattern exhibiting paired headers between the normal stretcher pattern. This is similar to a type known as garden wall bond. The house has a low-pitched hipped roof with projecting eaves. Under the eaves lie pairs of tooled “S” brackets on a molded frieze. The window openings are flat and are headed by a brick radiating voussoir. The front facade top-story windows have brick sills, which have replaced the wooden lugsills that sit below all of the home’s other windows. The front facade has a one story bay window with a hipped roof and eaves jutting out. A molded corona decorates the plain cornice. Beneath this are medalioned block brackets set on a molded frieze panel which has been intricately decorated with carved swirling medallions. The main entrance is framed by a flat-topped portico which is highly decorated in the same fashion as the bay and is supported further by carved brackets and beveled posts. A molded panel encloses the bottom portion of the portico. The main entrance is a paneled door flanked by sidelights and headed by a flush, light transom panel. A one-story side addition has pilasters, which run to the eave line of the balcony above. A molded and paneled balustrade capped by round urns encloses the balcony. Underneath the eaves one can see decorative stepped brickwork.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
53 King Street – St. Mark’s Rectory – c. 1878 – It is a good example of the late Victorian villa with Italianate details in red brick complete with its essential exterior details of two story bay window, paired brackets to eaves, and gables, elaborate front verandah, Victorian sashing and entrance door case. In 1956, St. Mark’s Church sold the Ambrose House (50 King Street) in order to purchase this house located directly beside the Church for use as a rectory.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
55 King Street – Charles Wickett House – c. 1909 – This house was built for Charles Hearn Wickett, a prominent dry goods merchant. About1920 the first floor was extended to the south and the back verandah added. It is side gabled, three storys, triple brick, stretcher bond on a cement foundation. It has an irregular cedar shake roof, gables half timbered on stucco, hooded windows and dormers. The fenestration is the most impressive feature with a total of 47 multi-faceted windows in a variety of groupings. Except for the neoclassical front entrance and back verandah this house is an interesting Canadian vernacular version of the Arts and Crafts style of architecture. The house has a symmetrical plan with a large hall, three reception rooms, a large kitchen and butler’s pantry on the main floor, four bedrooms plus a sewing room and bathroom on the second, and another three bedrooms and bathroom on the third. In 1912, the living room was enlarged by extending the main floor at the front to the south. In the space created behind the extension a two-sided verandah was added.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
61 King Street – R. Charles Smith House – c. 1858 – The house is basically a hip roof Regency Villa with a central hall plan. The main west facade is relieved by a central projection with a pedimental gable, and pilasters, articulating the south wall and each corner, enhance the mass and solidity of the structure. Decorative projecting header bricks under the wide eaves resemble dentils. The two tall brick chimneys on each side of the house are ornamented with brick dentils and with recessed panels. A verandah spans the south side of the house and has eight-sided posts resting on paneled square bases, and carved details below the roof line. There is a bay window in the frontispiece consisting of one six over six, and two two-over-two double hung sash. Robert Charles Smith (1817-1886) built this impressive brick house for himself and his wife Sara. The house is across the street from his father’s house (John David Smith), the Bluestone (21 Dorset Street East). In 1851, R. Charles Smith contributed to the building boom that occurred during the early 1850s by building a commercial block at 48-60 Walton Street. He established himself as a lumber dealer.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
117 King Street – Elias Peter Smith House (The Little Bluestone) – c. 1834 – The little Bluestone is a small Upper Canadian house, little more than a cottage. Certain elements are related to the Bluestone, but here the local stone also stuccoed is supplemented by limestone of better quality for sills, lintels and string course instead of the red sandstone used in the larger house. The principal external feature which gives such distinction to the facade is the door case, but its dominance over the adjoining windows is relieved by the judiciously placed semi-circular attic light in the gable. In 1834, John David Smith married his second wife Augusta and built the Bluestone (21 Dorset Street East). In that same year, J.D. Smith’s eldest son, Elias Peter Smith (1807-1860) married Sophia Soper (1803-1885) and the Little Bluestone was built on the same estate. Elias Peter Smith was named after his grandfather, Elias Smith, one of the founding fathers of Port Hope. He was the Manager of the local branch of the Bank of Upper Canada located in the 1840’s on Walton Street (118-120 Walton Street).
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
15 Baldwin Street – William Hewson House – c. 1850 – This is a one-story cottage from the north facade, while a view of the south facade shows two storys. It is a classic example of the Ontario Cottage with three bays and a center gable in its hipped roof. The house is done in narrow clapboard. The building has well-proportioned exterior features and a center-hall plan. At the gable peak in the center of the main facade sits a finial; directly below this, tucked into the gable, is a semi-circular fanlight divided into five parts by narrow radiating muntins. Between the main facade’s windows and directly below the fanlight is a small, enclosed porch. Small double windows of three panes each are located on the front face of the porch which has a truncated hipped roof. The sashed windows are six-over-six and have slightly protruding lugsills that are decorated with end drops resembling acorns. The windows are treated with eared label surrounds. The horizontally louvred shutters on the main facade are for decoration. 15 and 11 Baldwin Street were built by William and Henry Hewson. The Hewson brothers were born in England and arrived in Port Hope in the early 1840s.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
35 Baldwin Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, cornice brackets, attractive porches, arched voussoirs
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
108 Bruton Street – Nathaniel Gillespie Cottage – c. 1854 – This is an Ontario Cottage, single story frame house with a hipped roof and a semi-circular window in the central gable. the sun porch now masking the front is a more recent addition and may replace an earlier verandah, a feature to be expected on the south face. Nathaniel Gillespie (1821-1899) was originally from County Armagh Ireland. He and his wife Cecelia emigrated to Canada in 1847. He established himself as a painter, during the building boom of the 1850s and it is an occupation he would have his entire life. The house remained in the Gillespie family, transferring to son Robert Tobias in 1899 after the death of both Nathaniel and Cecelia, which occurred within two days of each other.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
159 Bruton Street – William Skitch Cottage – c. 1861 – This is a diminutive example of the Ontario cottage with a hip roof, front gable with fanlight and end chimneys; the house is set over a high basement so that the rear allows more light to the cellar. The facade has a center door with transom above flanked by French windows. The building has a rear wing. The exterior is rendered in roughcast, but there is evidence of the original stucco finish scored to look like ashlar. William Skitch (1823-1894) was born in Stratton, Cornwall, England in 1823, emigrating to Canada in 1850. His wife, Anne Burney and five children arrived later that year. William established a tailoring business. Unfortunately, his shop was located in the Quinlan Block (78-92 Walton Street), which was destroyed by a fire in 1866. He was left with only his tailor irons as a result of not having any insurance. He was able to re-establish his business and by 1871, son Henry (1849-1924) was also a tailor. He took over the family business when William died in 1894.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
254 Ridout Street – Richard Trick House – c. 1851 – This house is one of the finest examples of a brick Ontario Cottage in Port Hope. It is a raised cottage with the front entrance elevated from street level and approached by double stairs. The heavy lintels of the basement windows form a continuous line with the entrance platform. Capping the house is a low-pitch hipped roof with projecting eaves and a center gable. The cornice is boxed and has fine crown molding. Each corner and the ends of the gable have small acorn drops. A turned finial and drop pierce the front gable apex. Beneath the eaves is an interesting brick frieze which consists of protruding brick courses enclosing brick dentiling. An open circle of brickwork decorates the front gable. All of the front facade windows have timber lintels, which appear to be twice the height of the lugsills below. The main-story openings hold paired, double-sash windows with doubled, mullioned transoms above. At each window corner, just under the lintels, protruding blocks have been placed. This is a small but classic example of imagination and care on the part of the planner. The main entrance in its molded housing consists of a paneled door, flanked by sidelights. Topping the door is an unusual ogee transom with well-arranged muntins. The corners of the house exhibit brick quoins. The entire house is a showcase for the talents of Richard Trick, the original owner of this house, and a prominent local bricklayer. Richard Trick (1822-1890), originally from Hartland, Devon, England, came to Canada with his brother William about 1836. He established himself as a local mason and was responsible for building many of Port Hope’s important brick structures.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
267 Ridout Street – c. 1851 – corner quoins, transom above entrance, multi-paned windows, shutters
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
284 Ridout Street – Thomas Spry Cottage (Forge Cottage) – c. 1850 – The house is a good example of local Georgian styling of the one and a half story cottage design with a center hall plan, constructed of two course local brick. Some of the features are the brick pilasters, the entrance sidelights and transom. The window above the main door is known as an eyebrow window, which was to provide light to the upstairs hallway. The large twelve-paned windows provide excellent lighting and ventilation most of which is still the original glass. Rectangular multi-paned sidelights and a transom of the same style and dimension flank the Palladian proportioned front entrance. A unique fanlight window that provides light to the upper story appears to rest on the door lintel. Forge Cottage was built by Thomas Spry; the name of the cottage is a reference to his trade.

Port Hope, Ontario Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Port Hope, Ontario Book 3

Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
44 Pine Street North – c. 1816 – The two-story brick house in the Tudor Manor style has a steeply pitched gable roof, two chimneys, decorative buttresses, stepped gables with thickly molded windows, and enclosed front porch. on the ground floor there are double casement sash windows with Gothic tracery and a quatrefoil pattern in the top two panes. On the frontispiece above the brick porch is a Gothic arched double casement sash window. The brick porch is reinforced at the corners by attached pillars.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
82 Victoria Street South – Arthur Trefusis Heneage Williams House (Penryn Park) – c. 1859 – Penryn Park is an excellent example of the Cottage Gothic house. It includes details such as barge board trim truer to the medieval pattern in their cusped and carved form than the lacy interpretation common to other buildings of the period. The house has hood molds to openings and a Chinese pagoda roof over a rear second-story window and a tower at the entrance, which might be expected of the mid-nineteenth century Picturesque. Fine finials and pendants adorn the gables. A long verandah with chamfered pillars runs along the south side of the house; originally narrow, it was widened by three feet in 1895. The house is constructed of local bright red brick with woodwork painted the appropriate period color of Tuscan red. The front steps display cast-iron risers. The oldest chimney is a joined chimney with six flues. Penryn Park was built for one of Port Hope’s most famous citizens – Colonel Arthur Trefusis Heneage Williams. His father, John Tucker Williams, came to Canada during the War of 1812 and later settled in Port Hope to become its first Mayor. Arthur T.H. Williams was born in Port Hope in 1837. Arthur attended Upper Canada College in Toronto and Edinburgh University in Scotland. Like his father, he held many responsible positions in the town in addition to managing the family’s business enterprises that included large land holdings and investments in timber and mines. His political career included being elected several times to the Ontario legislature from 1865 to 1875, and later holding the position of Conservative MP in Ottawa from 1878 to 1885. After his marriage to Emily Seymour in 1859, Colonel A.T.H. Williams commissioned architect Edward Haycock to design his house named Penryn Park on the vast acreage adjacent to his father’s house, Penryn Homestead (82 Victoria Street). A.T.H. Williams is best remembered for his military career. He was Colonel of the 46th Regiment and saw service during the Fenian Invasion. As Commander of the Midland battalion during the Riel rebellion of 1885, he led a daring charge against the Metis that resulted in victory at Batoche, Saskatchewan.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
82 Victoria Street South – John Tucker Williams House (Penryn Homestead) – c. 1828-1829 – The exterior appearance is the result of extensive alterations made in the 1890s. These included the bricking over of the roughcast walls, the building of the two projecting porches to the north and south through the full height of the house, and a rebuilding of the roof, which altered its pitch and extended its eaves. The exterior double doors have a rectangular transom above them. The roof is a medium pitched hip with center flat deck and has brick chimneys. Each of the projecting porches has returned eaves, ornamental dentils, and a small circular window below the peak. From the main facade projection extends a porch with fluted Doric pillars and a carved radiating fan decoration in the pediment. On the north front projection is a pair of shuttered casement windows, and on the north facade wall are four two-over-two double hung shuttered sash windows.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
17 Victoria Street South – Samuel Coombe Cottage – c. 1860 – This is a one story high hip-roofed Ontario cottage, roughly square in plan with an ell to the rear. Constructed in stretcher-bond brick, it stands on a level site on a corner lot. The facade is symmetrically arranged around a central front door flanked by sidelights and transom. The gable is decorated with barge board and accented by a round-headed window and topped by a spike finial and ornament. Of special interest is the front door vestibule that could be seasonally removed in the warmer months. Samuel Coombe (1826-1905) was born in Stowford County, Devon England emigrating to Port Hope during the prosperous early 1850’s. He made a contribution as a carpenter during the building boom, and into the following decades.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
345 Lakeshore Road – William & Augusta Fraser House (Dunain) – c. 1857 – It was named Dunain (translated means Hill of the Birds) after the family’s ancestral home near Inverness in Scotland. The house was built by William A. Fraser on land given by his wife’s family, the Williams, owners of Penryn Homestead. In 1898, the house was taken over by Mr. Fraser’s daughter, Sarah and her husband, Frederick Barlow Cumberland. The Cumberland coat of arms etched on stained glass graces the front entrance window. The style of the original house is Loyalist Georgian with its dignified symmetry but this house exhibits a breakaway from the rigid symmetry of earlier Georgian houses. The porch and portico were added to the north side in the latter part of the century, as was the conservatory to the south, which was rebuilt again in the early part of the 20th century. The original portion of the house is a two-story red brick structure with a symmetrically placed front door, and symmetrically placed windows. The roof is a hip roof with wide overhangs and bold cornice fascia. The roof culminates in a glass roofed Belvedere bringing light into the central hall below. There is a west wing, probably originally servants’ quarters constructed in the same manner as the main house and capped by a Belvedere, lighting the center hall of this wing. A further addition was made to this west wing to accommodate a more modern kitchen, constructed in a similar manner to the original house. In the latter part of the 19th century, the front portico and porch were added to the north side of the house, the style of which is more Classic Revival popular in that period. The porch is a good example of the classical period with classical Doric columns and a wide entablature and in-filled with large windows extending to the ceiling inside. These windows are an eight over sixteen central window with four over eight sidelights on both floors, and sides of the portico and paneled. The railing for the upper porch completes this classical composition. To the southeast is a conservatory constructed in steel and is an excellent example of early 20th century greenhouse construction. This present structure replaces an earlier conservatory.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
22 Shortt Street -Thomas White House – c. 1890 – The style of this frame two-story house can be described as cottage with horizontal wood ship lap siding, six over six windows and simple trim. The plan is unusual with a side entrance accentuated by a simple but elegant porch. High pitched cross axis roofs add particular interest to this house. The front of the house has a picket fence. White was originally from England, born in 1838, and as of the 1881 census had four daughters and one son. The house remained in the White family for many decades transferring to the White children in 1929.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
48 Bloomsgrove Avenue – Thomas B. Chalk House – c. 1890 – This late Victorian two-story brick house has fine brick detailing. The center bay of the house has two large arched windows (typical of the Romanesque style) with stained glass semicircular transoms. Above is a protruding bay window in frame with fine wood detailing and a large arched top central window. The peak of the roof above has decorative fretwork suggesting a more Edwardian period. The side bay has a similar arched top window. On either side of the house is a porch. The west porch protects the front door located on the side of the building, while the east porch provides a kitchen entrance. Each of these porches has decorative columns and fretwork. A side bay window is similar to the front bay window. The brickwork has decorative brick arches over windows, brick corbels with specially formed brick, brick banding, and decorative brick chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
5 Bloomsgrove Avenue – Robert Horsey House – c. 1870 – Robert Horsey was a Port Hope carpenter. This one and a half story, two bay house is rectangular in plan and constructed of brick veneer laid in stretcher bond with a coarse rubble foundation. The roof is a high gable, gable end to the street, and contains some decorative trim at the apex. The eaves consist of a plain boxed cornice. The shuttered windows on the upper story are six over six double-hung sash with plain surround and lugsills. The decorative details on the porch are Victorian details.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
98 Ontario Street – Thomas Wickett House (Penstowe) – c. 1894 – Although built in the Queen Anne Revival style, it has detailing of the Romanesque style. The roof is irregular and complicated, but is composed basically of several steeply pitched gables and one overhanging gable dormer. The gables are pedimented with some rafters exposed. The pediment has a set of triple windows in a bold wooden surround. Trimming the windows are tooled pilasters and heavy entablature. Decorative shingles complete the pediment. The stretcher-bond brick house has various types of structural openings from flat on the top story, to segmental on the projecting south bay, to rounded Romanesque on the front facade. Voussoirs head most windows, but protruding arched gables of brick surround the semi-elliptical openings. Stringer courses join the sills of the house and join the tips of the arches on the main facade. The main door is set in one of the arched openings, but is itself flat. The house has a second-story bell-cast balcony adorned with heavy turned balusters and turned columns. The balcony roof is supported by brackets and has a molded frieze. The open end of the balcony is partially filled by lattice-like woodwork. The spooled columns are turned and have a rounded, bulbous appearance. On the first story, a shed-roofed porch with the same characteristics can be seen. The house sits on a squared-stone foundation with segmental basement windows.
Architectural Photos, Port Hope, Ontario
162 Peter Street – This two-story house is indicative of the Italianate Style Victorian house. A symmetrically placed entrance is noted for its heavily decorated portico topped by iron balustrade made in the foundry of the original owner. The entrance is flanked by two bay windows with similar iron topping. The roof overhangs are supported by brackets typical of this Italianate period and is topped by a widow’s walk. The semi-circular window over the entrance designed in a Florentine pattern is of particular interest. Another interesting point is the unusual width of the overhanging eaves with their double brackets.