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Edwardian Architecture in Ontario – Top 42 Picks

Edwardian Architecture in Ontario

Edwardian, 1900-1930 – This style bridges the ornate and elaborate styles of the Victorian era and the simplified styles of the 20th century. Edwardian Classicism provided simple, balanced facades, simple roof lines, dormer windows, large front porches, and smooth brick surfaces. Voussoirs and keystones are used sparingly and are understated. Finials and cresting are absent. Cornice brackets and braces are block-like and openings have flat arches or plain stone lintels.

Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford – 126 King Street – Post Office – A.D. 1914 – Two-story smooth red brick structure has ashlar stone lintels and string courses at the window liens. It is sometimes called Edwardian in style because it was built during the reign of King Edward VII. The clock tower is a landmark for the business district.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dunnville Book 1 – 241 Broad Street West – The Lalor Estate is a two-and-a-half-story residence with a four-gable roof and a wraparound veranda with fluted columns. This Edwardian structure was built in 1905. Its builder was Francis Ramsey Lalor, a prominent Dunnville businessman, politician, philanthropist, and entrepreneur. His business interests included two dry goods stores, a grocery store, an apple evaporator, natural gas wells, the F.R. Lalor Canning Factories, the F.R. Lalor Ashes Company, and the Monarch Knitting Mills. The exterior walls are red brick. There is a two-story bay window, Tudor-style timbering in the gable, a pediment above the entrance with a decorative tympanum, and sidelights beside the front door.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smithville – 121 West Street – Edwardian – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 50 Albert Street – 1903 – Snyder-Seagram House – Edwardian Classical in parged concrete – superposed sets of Palladian windows and bay windows projecting over both stories; curved, wraparound verandah with classical columns
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 331 Centre Street South
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1460 Queen Street West – circa 1900 – This 1½ story frame house with the ‘clipped’ center gable end to the street has a west facing dormer window more typical of Edwardian Classical style. The house was built after the 1898 Alton fire insurance map was printed. The house has been cladded with a modern brick veneer with contrasting brickwork trim made to resemble the Victorian Gothic style of the neighboring Mechanics Institute.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – Edwardian – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Galt Book 1 (Cambridge) – 54 Blenheim Road – Edwardian style with Palladian window in gable
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Preston (Cambridge) – 519 Queenston Road – Italianate/ Edwardian style, Palladian window in gable
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Chatsworth – Edwardian
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Chesley – #140 – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 1 – 135 King Street West – 1902 – William Academy – Now a private school, this building was formerly the home of Cobourg Collegiate. Many men from the town who served in WW1 attended high school here and some of them returned to finish their studies after their time at the front. Built in 1902 in a style known as Edwardian Classical, the building features oversized Palladian windows on the second level which add drama to its front facade. Additions to the school building were made in 1939 and during the 1960s, but in 2015 the collegiate moved to a new facility on King Street East.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Conestogo – Edwardian – 2 story tower-like bay, fretwork, Romanesque style window arches, 2nd floor balcony, cobblestone basement
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 82 Sydenham Street – Edwardian style – palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton and Bolton Book – Bolton – 56 Sterne Street – circa 1900 – This ‘four square’ red brick house is built in the Edwardian Classical style, characterized by an asymmetric floor plan, attic dormer window, full front verandah with classical column supports and pyramidal hipped roof. For many years into the 1960s, it was the home of Mrs. Alice Goodfellow and her twin sister Miss Monkman.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 181 Oxford Street – This cement block house was built for R.A. Skinner who owned and operated Skinner’s Livery on the north side of Charles Street at the Oxford corner. Stained-glass panel on first floor window; pediment above porch with Doric pillars; a lion on either side of the front steps. This home was the scene of many elaborate house parties, the form of entertainment that made up the fabric of social life of the times. The Skinner Livery, sometimes referred to as the Bon Ton Livery, maintained vehicles for pleasure driving, business trips, weddings, funerals, etc.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kitchener Book 1 – 132 Water Street – Edwardian style with dormer in attic, balcony above the verandah
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 427 King Street – 1902 – medium gabled roof with a half-round window; gingerbread trim on fascia; exterior is cedar shingles and stretcher brick; brick voussoirs and window shutters; transom window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 2 – Hugel Avenue – Edwardian – Palladian window, pediment above pillared veranda with open railing
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Mount Pleasant – 1229 Highway 54 – Edwardian, Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 200 First Avenue West – Former Normal School/Teacher’s College opened in 1909 with an enrollment of 25 students and continued in operation until 1972. This design is exemplary of the architectural influence of the Edwardian style. The observatory-like dome, the elaborate cornices and the formal entrance are three main characteristics of the building.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 6 York Street – Edwardian style – corner quoins, paired cornice brackets, triangular pediment supported by columns
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 65 Broadway – Edwardian Classicism – large triangular front gable with Palladian window and shallow roofed porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 3 – 27 Zina – Edwardian Classicism built in 1923 with large triangular front gable with Palladian window and shallow roofed porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 12 Cartier Street – Edwardian – voussoirs above stained glass window, cornice brackets, Palladian window in gable, and Ionic capitals on porch pillars with balcony above
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 18 Banfield Street – Edwardian style – Palladian window, turret extending through the roof
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 50 Herriot Street – Kininvie (means where my family lives) was built of reddish sandstone in 1906 for textile manufacturer Thomas A. Code – grand Edwardian – said to have been heated by steam from the factory across the street
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 232 Clarence Street – Built by lawyer Louis Kinnear in 1904, it was the home of his daughter Judge Helen Kinnear from 1904-1943, the year she became the first federally appointed woman judge in Canada and the Commonwealth. Helen Kinnear was also the first woman in the Commonwealth to be granted in 1934, “King’s Council,” a distinction given to noteworthy lawyers. She was also the first woman lawyer to appear before the Supreme Court of Canada. The house exhibits a combination of Edwardian and Victorian architectural styles.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Elgin Book 2 – Yellow brick – Edwardian – two-and-a-half story tower-like bay with projecting eaves and large fretwork pieces resembling brackets – matching fretwork piece over lower window to left of porch and below porch roof
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 126 Walton Street – Wilson-Benson House – c. 1885 – This two and a half story brick house is built in the Queen Anne Revival style with an offset tower, a broad verandah, and a steeply pitched roof. The gable on the Walton Street facade is sheathed in decorative shingle. The tower is five-sided with a conical roof topped by a finial and contains a long window on each story of each wall surface. The large main floor window is Edwardian in treatment with colored glass in the semi-circular transom section. For fifty years, the Wilsons were publishers of the Port Hope Guide.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 91-93 Mill Street North – Deyell Terrace – c. 1890 – 91 and 93 Mill Street are, respectively, the south and middle sections of a row of three attached related buildings. The two-bay, two story houses are constructed of brick laid in garden wall bond. The roof is of medium pitch with a front gable containing a decorative finial. The doorways are in a projecting frontispiece and are composed of paired doors containing long round-headed windows with square panels below. A transom with one dividing muntin is contained above. The windows in the projecting frontispiece below the gable are Edwardian in style with segmental stained-glass transoms above two vertically divided panes. A small mainly decorative round-headed louvered window is placed below the gable.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 2 – 223 George Street – 1900 – Edwardian – Palladian window, wraparound verandah supported by pillars, pediment with decorated tympanum, dentil molding
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 1048 Queen Street East – This residence is situated on a large treed lot at the south west corner of Queen Street East and Upton Road in the east end of the central residential core. William Howard Hearst established a legal practice in Sault Ste. Marie in 1888 and in 1904 built “Eastbourne” as his residence, naming it for its location in the east end of town. In 1908 Hearst became the Member of Provincial Parliament for Algoma and in 1914 the first Premier of Ontario from Northern Ontario. Eastbourne is a good example of Edwardian architecture using local materials. It was constructed in 1904 with a ‘t-shaped’ plan; each of the arms are the same width and projection. Two-stories in height with a full basement and attic, it is constructed of soft red brick and local red sandstone. It has a gabled roof and the attic gables are clad with painted wood shingles. The deep cornice and soffits have decorative brackets. Large bow windows dominate the east and west facades. The sash windows are triple and double hung. The porch has a broken pediment, pilasters and triple clusters of truncated Doric columns. The basement and porch foundations are of local red sandstone.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 2 – 339 Glen Morris Road East – Edwardian, Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stouffville Book 1 – 2 Albert Street – Built c. 1895 for James McConnachie, the Manager of the Toronto Fruit and Vinegar Works – two stories, Edwardian style (board and batten addition)
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay (Port Arthur Book 2) – 27 Cumberland Street South – In 1909, land was purchased by Molson Company in downtown Port Arthur to build a bank. The three-story building had offices on the second floor and bank manager’s quarters on the third floor, and featured a beautiful exterior made of limestone mined from the Rossport area. Molson’s bank opened in 1912 and did banking business with families of loggers, miners, shippers, and prospectors of the Port Arthur area. The architecture style is Edwardian Classicism. Prominent features of the building include the rusticated stone on the ground-floor walls and large keystones. Doric columns surround the main entrance and there is a heavy string course between the first and second stories. In 1954, the building was sold to the Bank of Montreal which operated here until 1984.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay (Fort William Book 2) – 121 McKellar Street South – Built in 1907 for owner Thomas P. Kelley, a local merchant, the house was later sold to Dr. R. Kerr Dewar who had fought in the First World War, returned home to study medicine and purchased this home in 1920. The first floor was converted to a medical clinic in 1928. The building is a good example of Edwardian Classicism. It has metal cresting on one of the dormer windows. The first and second floors both have distinctive Palladian windows with prominent keystones. On the front facade, the centrally placed wood covered porch is supported by brick piers. There is a two-story bay window.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 2 – 44 Baldwin Street – c. 1914 – 2½ story frame residential building in the Edwardian Classic style, brick cladding, hip gable roof, L-shape with a wing projecting from the main block gable end to the street, a flat-roofed verandah with open porch above
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 1 – 841 Kildare Road – Miers-Fraser House built 1904 – Edwardian, Palladian window, two-story bay, Ionic columns supporting a pediment
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 849 Victoria Avenue – 1907 – Edwardian – rounded bay, flared eaves, a columned porch with pediment, dormer, hipped roof, red brick with stone trim
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 376 Drew Street – c. 1852 – Edwardian – L shape two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof with one gable dormer and one gable both with green painted shingles in a pattern, gable end has Palladian window with decorated cornice in apex, center door is protected by square piers, open porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 155 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1860s – Edwardian – symmetrical two story with attic, painted wood siding with decorative shingles between floors, steep hip roof, gable dormer, deep cornice and dentils, 1-over-1 rectangular windows with Palladian center window, centered door with rectangular transom, cement platform porch

Georgian Architecture in Ontario – Top 39 Picks

Georgian Architecture in Ontario

Georgian, before 1860 – This style began with the British King Georges in the 18th century. These buildings have balanced facades around a central door, medium-pitched gable roofs, and small-paned windows.

Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – 477 Main Street – Rockwood Academy – Georgian style – three-story stone building with limestone walls, rough-cut quoins, symmetrical five-bay facade with double-hung six-over-six wood sash windows with a central door with a portico and a transom window and sidelights. Low-pitched cedar-shingle gable roof with many small brick and stone chimneys – The owner’s bedrooms still exist on the second floor, as do the students’ bedrooms on the third floor. The south wing still contains the classroom below the student bedrooms. The west wing remains unaltered and contains a carriage house on the ground floor with a gymnasium above.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – Wilson Street – Township Hall – constructed in 1871, a stone building in the Georgian style of architecture with a Neo-Classical portico and an Italianate cupola.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Caledonia – 80 Caithness Street East – formerly Caledonia Town Hall – 1856 – Classical Georgian design – pediment above front entrance, pilasters, dentil molding below cornice, cupola on roof, arched window voussoirs and keystones
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Amherstburg Book 1 – 525 Dalhousie Street – Bellevue House – 1816-1819 – One of the finest remaining examples of domestic Georgian Neo-Classical architecture in Ontario – the home of Robert Reynolds, the commissary to the garrison at Fort Malden, and his sister, Catherine Reynolds, an accomplished landscape painter who worked in pencil, crayon, sepia wash and water colors recording scenes along the Detroit River and Lake Erie
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grimsby – 126 Main Street West – Nelles Manor is a historic home completed in 1798 by Colonel Robert Nelles, a Loyalist from the Mohawk Valley, New York. The house is considered to be the oldest inhabited dwelling between Niagara and Kingston. It was built in the Georgian style of locally quarried stone over a ten-year period (1788-98). Built facing north and Lake Ontario on an old path called Squire Nelles’ Lane, the main entrance was later moved to the south on the other side, with a pillared porch facing on to the new Stone Road (now Main Street). The Neo-Classical portico was added in the early 1820s. This home served as Nelles’ residence during his lengthy career as Justice of the Peace, Member of the Legislative Assembly and Commander of the 14th Lincoln Militia. Colonel Nelles’ office was a small room on the north side, where he performed many marriages before clergy were available. The house was a center for gala events and remained in the Nelles family possession until 1963. It has seven fireplaces, walnut woodwork and spacious halls and rooms. Originally a private residence, it was turned into a museum in 2016 and is now open to the public.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 19767 Main Street – Agnes and John S. Meek House – circa 1853 – This two-story Georgian style house with roughcast exterior and massive return eaves is one of Alton’s earliest homes. John Meek, a merchant and hotel owner, was named Alton’s first postmaster in 1854 and this house became the post office. After his death in 1866, Agnes Meek was appointed postmistress, followed in 1876 by their son James who served until 1883. The Meek’s son Thomas owned the house until 1950.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 1 – 42 Cross Street – Georgian style architecture
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford – 55 Maple Avenue North – Stuart House – 1886 – was built by Elijah Stuart in the Georgian Symmetry style with Italianate features, segmental arched windows, double brackets under the eaves and quoining on the corners. The double-hung front door has a fanlight and the second-floor door has a keystone arch linking the same color detail line across the front of the house.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Galt Book 1 (Cambridge Book 1) – 1 Brant Road North – Georgian style, dormers in attic, Italianate style veranda with pillars
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
York – 39 Front Street South – The Enniskillen Lodge, formerly the Barber Hotel, was built in 1862 for Mr. Daniel Barber, a prominent local hotelier. Large Georgian style windows, doors, and brick detailing are spaced and designed symmetrically. It has a projected cornice with dentils, Regency four-panel door with sidelights and rectangular transom, hood molds over windows, horizontal banding, and corner quoins.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 5 – 10 Chapel Street – c. 1841 – This house has Georgian features – balanced facade, medium-pitched roof, and robust end chimneys. Its rather heavy and severe doorway, with its single panel, is characteristic of the Greek Revival style.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton – 136 Old Danforth Road – Grover House – This two-story (white with dark green shutters) symmetrical designed house with central front door typifies the Georgian style. It was built in c. 1822 by John Grover, an early (1798) settler from Grafton Massachusetts. The hamlet was named after his home town. The original windows would have had 9 over 9, small glass panes. The replacement windows and white cedar clapboard are probably from around 1900. The clapboard still covers the original cedar shingle siding. John Grover gave the land, across from his house, to the Presbyterian Church, now United Church.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – 21 Stuart Street – Georgian style, belvedere, window voussoirs with keystones, portico
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 4 – 43 Inglewood Drive – Georgian style, dormers, balcony
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Merrickville – 905 St. Lawrence Street – The Aaron Merrick House – built in 1844 of local stone with refined stone window surrounds and oversized stone quoins for the son of the founder of Merrick’s Mills – Georgian style with distinct Neo-classical detailing; dormers; semi-elliptical fanlight with sidelights frame a door found within a pedimented portico that is light and elegant
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 3 – 12549 Niagara Parkway – Danner House Bed and Breakfast – It was built in 1805 by American immigrant Ulrich Strickler, after moving from Pennsylvania in 1801. It is a stone building with a stucco finish in an early Loyalist Georgian style. The Danner-Sherk House is a solid construction of stone with a white stucco finish, four irregularly spaced bays across the front and a low-pitched roof. The house has the original front entry including the side lights, six-panel door and wood paneling in the door recess. During the War of 1812, his crops and supplies were taken by American troops leaving him with little for survival. Later the house was occupied by the British. After the war in 1816, the house was sold to Joseph Danner, a Quaker from Pennsylvania who moved to Canada in 1807. Danner owned the property from 1816 until 1847; during this period, he reconstructed sections of the home and continued to farm the land. The house was again occupied by troops during the 1837-1838 rebellion as were most homes during this time.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara-on-the-Lake Book 1 – 209 Queen Street – The Charles Inn c. 1832 – Georgian style – The house was constructed in 1832 by Charles Richardson, a barrister and Member of Parliament. He used the house as his principle residence and later as his summer house. The verandahs and servant’s wing on the east side of the house were added in the end of the last century.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oakville – 1835 – David Patterson, Shipbuilder – #19 – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 63 Broadway – James Graham – Tavern Keeper c. 1852 – Greystones Inn – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oshawa Book 1 – Centre Street South – Georgian style, dormers
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 59-61 Banfield Street – Georgian – two-story frontispiece with pediment
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Parry Sound – 10 Gibson Street – Bayside Inn
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 66 Craig Street – Inge-Va (a Tamil word meaning “come here”) Museum – local sandstone house – 1824 – Colonial Georgian style of an Ontario cottage – balanced facade, sidelights and transom
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 – 404 Belmont Avenue – Georgian, dormers in attic
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 21 Dorset Street East – John David Smith House (The Bluestone) – c. 1834 – The two-story house is rectangular in plan. The basement is of random rubble and the four end chimneys are brick. The style of the house is Greek Revival. Although the symmetry and the rectangular plan are typical of the Georgian style, much of the exterior and interior detail is definitely Greek in derivation. The house is well-proportioned and balanced with nine windows on the main and rear facades and six windows on the west end (one false).
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 4 – 314 Vidal Street North – Georgian, pillared entrance with curved pediment, dentil molding, decorative cornice, voussoirs and keystones, sidelights and transom window
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 831 Queen Street East – The Ermatinger Old Stone House is a two-story stone structure built on the north bank of the St. Mary’s River near the rapids in Sault Ste. Marie. The house provides a link to Sault Ste. Marie’s role in the fur trade and to one of its earliest settlers. Charles Oakes Ermatinger, a member of a prominent Montreal family who joined the Northwest Company and married Charlotte Katawabeda, the daughter of the Paramount Chief of the Ojibway, built the house in 1812-1814 of local red sandstone in a style characteristic of vernacular Georgian architecture but employed Quebec construction techniques. The house quickly became the center of government in the northwest part of the province and of the business and social life of the district. It later served as the first courthouse, a post office and a hotel. The house served as the headquarters of Sir Garnet Wolseley in 1870 when the expedition he commanded stopped at Sault Ste. Marie enroute to quell the Red River Rebellion and to establish Canadian sovereignty over Manitoba and the Northwest Territories.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 109 Norfolk Street South – Eva Brook Donly Museum – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Southampton – Walker House – a popular meeting place for food and spirits since 1915 – Georgian style – 146 High Street – a historic hotel in the village since the 1860s
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Southwest Oxford Township – Delmer – Brownsville Road
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines, Book 4 – 101 King Street – former Court House – Georgian style – 1848-1849 – The visible James and King Street facades are of channeled Queenston ashlars while the concealed west and north walls are constructed with a course rubble limestone and brick, respectively. The front facade has a tower with a three-faced striking clock and is topped by an octagonal cupola. The clock continues to chime with the assistance of the original weights which extend from the clock tower to the first floor. The entrance to the building is carved in stone like the town hall in Perugia, Italy. It features upright balustrades which conform to the slope of the stairway. The supporting columns under the copings on each side are individually carved to fit its specific location. The northeast wing cut-stone addition to the original structure was built in 1865 to accommodate the County offices and courthouse.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 2 – 129 Oakland Road – Built by Mordecai Westbrook, a member of one of the original families of Oakland. Georgian style with original double hung six over six windows and shutters. The walls are triple-bricked with bricks said to have been made on site. The widow’s walk and rear stone coach house are both original.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stoney Creek – The Nash-Jackson House was originally located at the north-east corner of King Street East and Nash Road in Hamilton. The house was built in 1818 in the Georgian style. The house was moved to Stoney Creek Battlefield Park in 1999.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln (Jordan) – 3812 Main Street, Jordan Station – Georgian style – curved pediment above door
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 2 – 39 Main Street North – Former Commercial Hotel Building and Property – Hobby Horse Arms – c. 1868 – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterford – Georgian – six-over-six windows, Doric pillars, widow’s walk on rooftop, sidelights and transom window around door
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 3 – 20 Menno Street – Conrad Fenner, carpenter and joiner, built his own wood frame house in 1867; he enlarged his 1½ story home to a full 2 stories in 1886 – Georgian style, pediment above entrance, fluted half columns, cornice brackets, granite field stone foundation
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 942 Victoria Avenue – Georgian with eyebrow window in roof, pillared entrance with rounded pediment
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 447 Hunter Street – 1913 – Neo-Georgian architecture, Neo-Classical door – symmetrical two story, red brick, once Presbyterian manse, parapet ends on gable roof, decorative stone keystone and stone

Gothic Architecture in Ontario – Top 36 Picks

Gothic Architecture in Ontario

Gothic Revival, 1830-1890 – These decorative buildings have sharply-pitched gables with highly detailed verge boards, pointed-arch window openings, and dichromatic brickwork. It is a common style in Ontario.

Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ajax, Pickering Book – 1709 Highway 7 Road, Brougham – The Former Commercial Hotel in Brougham, Ontario is a two-story brick building in the Gothic Revival style with a gable roof and has pointed arched windows in two dormers with finials and decorative wood fascia. It was initially built as a home and then converted into a hotel.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 301 Centre Street South – c. 1875 – built for William Hood, a retired Whitby farmer and son of an English settler – rubble-stone foundation, white clapboard building, two-story vernacular Gothic Revival
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – 117 Wilson Street West – c. 1855 – Gothic Revival, two-story red brick house, verge board trim and finials on gables, corner quoins, bay windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 63-65 Sydenham Street – three gable Gothic Revival Style, finials on gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cheltenham – 14376 Creditview Road – Frederick Haines House – circa 1887 -After losing his first home to the 1887 fire, entrepreneur Frederick Haines, son of Cheltenham’s founder, built this red brick house with intricate yellow brick patterning. Later additions are compatible with the original three gable Victorian Gothic style. In the 1940s-1950s, it became a United Church rest and holiday home. It later housed an antique shop before being converted back to a private residence. It has a bell cast roof over each front bay, an arched entry and etched glass transom and sidelights of the central entrance.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burlington – 2201 Lakeshore Road – Gothic Revival, corner quoins, triple gables, keystones and voussoirs, transom window above double front door
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1581 Queen Street East – Archibald Dick House – circa 1875 -Hotelier Archibald Dick built this very elaborate Victorian Gothic style red brick house with contrasting yellow brick patterning, symmetrical projecting front bays, paired double windows, intricate fretwork and Italianate influenced paired brackets. The house has ten rooms.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 1 – 169 Front Street – Town Hall – designed by local architect John D. Evans and built in 1872-73 by contractor John Forin in High Victorian Gothic Revival style – brick and limestone building with tall lancet windows on the second floor with mullions dividing the windows in two with simple tracery in the arches, a bell-cast mansard roof with dormers, a massive 144-foot clock tower with octagonal buttresses, four large illuminated clock faces and cast iron railings and weather vanes
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt – 22 Blenheim Road – 1½ story Gothic Revival house with large dormers in the attic
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dorchester – 15 Bridge Street – The Signpost – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elmira – 80 Arthur Street South – Gothic Revival, verge board trim
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Erin – 202 Main Street – Gothic Revival – late 1800s – verge board trim and finials on gables, bay window, corner quoins, dichromatic brickwork
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton Bolton Book – Bolton – 25 Nancy Street – Alice Goodfellow House – circa 1884 – This 1½ story Victorian Gothic home was built by George Watson for Alice Goodfellow using local red and yellow brick. The end gable patterning and the enclosed front porch are excellent examples of late nineteenth century urban architecture. Alice’s sister Margaret Smith lived next door. On Alice’s death in 1901, her brother-in-law Albion farmer James Goodfellow and his wife Marion retired here. It was in their family until the owner of 31 Nancy Street purchased it in 1999.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – 88 Fennell Avenue West -Auchmar Estate – Main house named after the Buchanan estate on Loch Lomond, Scotland, built 1852-1854 in the Gothic Revival style
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Innerkip – Tavistock and Innerkip Book – 132 Coleman Street – Gothic – built 1888 – 2 story stone building, steel roof
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kemptville Book – Toledo – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, painted corner quoins and voussoirs
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville – 90 Main Street East – The Jacob Wigle/William Mortan Webb House built 1886 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window, decorative brickwork including sawtooth designs, hood molds over the windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 5775 Peer Street – John Misener Jr. was born in 1829. He was 26 when he purchased the land on Peer Street from his father. His father, Captain John Misener owned and operated a wagon-making business on the corner of Main Street and Peer Street. John Misener Jr. assumed the wagon-making business after his father’s death in 1855. The house, c. 1855, is in the Ontario Gothic style with a central gable in the roof. The gable window design with a pediment is an adaptation of Italianate form. The field stone wall of the verandah was a later addition. The upper portion of the verandah features elaborate woodwork with turned posts.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 429 Ella Street – Lancey Hall built by Henry Warren Lancey – c. 1876 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim and finials on gables, iron cresting above bay window and enclosed front porch
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 115 Dorset Street West – Thomas Clarke House (The Cone) – c. 1858 – The one and a half story grey board and batten house incorporates some elements of the Gothic Revival style. It has steeply pitched gables, the appearance of irregularity because of complex roof patterns, pointed arched openings such as the Gothic window above the doorway, and decorative details including the quatrefoil window tracery in this same window, the barge boards in the gable peaks and the finial. A notable feature of the exterior is, the board and batten, was preferred by Downing for he believed that it was more economical than clapboard, and because it was a bolder method of construction, it better expressed the picturesque beauty essentially belonging to wooden houses. The main facade has three pairs of four over four double-hung sashes, a bay projection containing three casement windows, and five six over six double-hung sashes. The central double doors each have twelve windowpanes.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – 130 Guelph Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables, corner quoins, arched voussoirs, two-story tower-like bay
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 1 – 316 Christina Street North – Mackenzie House – 1856 – Gothic Revival – 2-story brick, high-peaked gable roof, elaborately decorated gable with barge board, finial and two pendants
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smiths Falls – 84 Lombard Street – Gothic – finials and trim on gables, corner quoins, voussoirs with keystones, second floor balcony; bay window with cornice brackets; turned spindle roof supports for veranda
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 1 – 19 Beverly Street East – Gothic – paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Jacobs – 7 Cedar Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 2 – 144 Queen Street West – built in 1865 for James McKay, one of St. Marys first inhabitants – the portico was added in the 1880s; Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gable with finial; transom and sidelights around door
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Thomas – 13 Wellington Street – built in 1881 – Gothic Revival – ornate verge board on dormer and extending wing, roof is surfaced in patterned slate, iron cresting above bay window and above porch, elaborate stone eyebrows surmount the paired windows on the second floor
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Strathroy – 145 Front Street – Gothic – corner quoins, shutters
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stratford – 122 Mornington Street – Gothic Revival triple-gabled home, verge board trim on gables, finials, corner quoins; front door has bracketed transom and sidelight windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – 140 Bidwell Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay – Fort William Book 1 – 808 Ridgeway Street – St. Paul’s Anglican Church – A.D. 1907 Built in the English Gothic style. Cut stone hooded moldings are found over the main entrance with lancet windows on either side. The two asymmetrical towers, a common feature of Gothic style churches, are topped with a crenellated roof line, giving the church a medieval-like appearance. The tallest tower has lancet winds, a rose window and a clock.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln – Beamsville – 5053 King Street – Beam Barnes House c. 1855 – The property was originally granted by the Crown to Samuel Corwin in 1803. His wife was Anna Beam, daughter of Loyalist pioneer Jacob Beam. Her brother, Jacob Beam Jr. built the house between 1852 and 1855. The frame house is an early version of the Gothic Revival style. Notable features are steeply pitched gable roofs with carved finials and cut out quatrefoils worked into the barge board on both the front facade and east wing. The veranda has simple square posts, and the front door has a paned transom and sidelights. The tops of the slender but widely framed windows are surrounded with shaped lintels and decorative keystones.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 1 – 169 Brock Street West – Jones House – Town Constable – c. 1876 – Gothic Revival with verge board trim and finial on gable
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 292 Dundas Street – Maple Lawn House 1860 – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on triple gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 36 Young Street West – a former farmhouse on 300 acres built in 1849 – 1½ story Gothic Revival style, gingerbread barge boards and tall finial on the dormer, broken arch of the gable window, tripartite windows of the front facade – the small second front door gave access to the doctor’s office
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Zorra Township – Embro – 109 Huron Street – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window

Italianate Architecture in Ontario – Top 34 Picks

Italianate Architecture in Ontario

Italianate, 1850-1900 – A two story rectangular building with a mild hip roof, a projecting frontispiece, and generous eaves with ornate cornice brackets was the basis of the style; often there are large sash windows, quoins, ornate detailing on the windows, belvederes and wraparound verandahs. Italianate commercial buildings often have cast iron cresting and elegant window surrounds.

Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Acton – 39 Willow Street – Knox Manse established 1889 – Italianate with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, pediment above pillared porch, fretwork and verge board on gable
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ajax – 497 Kingston Road West, Historic Pickering Village – 1870 – purchased in 1882 by Dr. Field for his daughter. Dr. Field was a practicing physician in Pickering Village and later built his own home directly east of this property. In 1929, Emerson & Henrietta Bertrand purchased the home and raised Allan Irwin. The family gave up the homestead in 1934, only to have it reclaimed in 1977 by their grandson, B. B. Bertrand (son of Allan). The building is a 2½ story brick structure in Italianate architecture.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – 311 Wilson Street East – Italianate, belvedere, paired cornice brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Aylmer – 375 Talbot Street West – Italianate, cornice brackets, two-story tower-like bays, balcony on second floor
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Caledonia – 201 Argyle Street – Italianate, hipped roof, dormer in attic, corner quoins, keystones and voussoirs, dichromatic brickwork, dentil molding under cornice, paired brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cheltenham – 14396 Creditview Road – Henry’s Hotel – circa 1887 – William Henry’s pre-1859 Inn was destroyed in the 1887 fire. He rebuilt, replacing the Inn with this two-story Georgian style frame building with hip roof and brick veneer. He named it ‘Henry’s Hotel’ operating it until his death in 1904. Thomas and Nathaniel Browne took it over as ‘Browne’s Hotel’. It was later a butcher shop with home above. In 1958 it was adapted to commercial/apartment use.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 3 – 110 Ontario Street – 1878 – “Illahee Lodge” – Italianate – built by John Jeffrey, hardware merchant – bay windows, front porch crowned with intricate wrought iron railing
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Collingwood – 199 Third Street – Built in the Italianate tradition for the Toner family, early coal and lumber merchants, this home has retained its elegance with minor alterations since 1882. The interior of the home features a circular staircase, marble fireplaces, plaster medallions and a built-in buffet. The exterior brick work laid in the common bond tradition is highlighted by protruding quoins and plinth in lighter contrasting brick. Decorative brick work adorns the original chimney as well as highlighting the window openings. Brick arch work and keystones decorate the window surrounds in a unique three-tiered stepped arch design. The main front facade contains unique, French doors with recessed mullion and molded panels. The home has a heavily bracketed low hip roof with an east side gable featuring a combination of corniced boxed brackets.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 1 – King Street – Italianate architecture
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elora – 120 Mill Street East – Drew House – Italianate style – dormers in attic, single cornice brackets, wraparound verandah with bric-a-brac
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Erin – 213 Main Street – Italianate – built A.D. 1891 – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, iron cresting above bay window, dichromatic brickwork
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fergus – 150 Union Street – Robert Phillips, Druggist c. 1883 – Italianate, hipped roof, corner quoins, two-story tower-like bay
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fisherville Book – Selkirk – 15 Erie Street North – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, quoins, banding
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fort Erie – 348 Ridge Road North
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Goderich – 65 Montreal Street – The “Garrow House” was built around 1850 and was the residence of James Thompson Garrow who later became Supreme Court Judge and local Judge of the Canadian Exchequer Court. It is in the Italianate style with unusual bracketing, a two-story veranda, large front windows and two end chimneys, a central Palladian window and decorative stone lintels and keystones.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton Bolton Book – Bolton – 31 Nancy Street – *George Smith House – circa 1877 – This Italianate style home was built by George Watson for Margaret and George Smith. The red and yellow bricks were locally made and its exterior architectural features and beautiful enclosed porches are original. Smith, a sign painter and letterer, sat on the first village Council and was noted for his very realistic interior faux-wood graining. Erie Smith Schaefer inherited the house in 1933, living here with her husband Alex of ‘Smith & Schaefer’ Hardware. This dichromatic brick house is in the Italianate style. The orientation of the ‘L’ plan with the enclosed verandah along the south is distinctive. The bracketed eaves, segmentally arched windows and low medium pitch hipped roof are all typical of the Italianate.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grimsby – 390 Main Street West – names for the house are Smith-Geddes House, Thornfield Hall, The Stone House – The two-and-a-half-story stone building was constructed between 1876 and 1878. The Smith-Geddes House was built on a flat area of land amidst orchards of peach and cherry trees. The rural location, close to Lake Ontario to the northeast and the Niagara escarpment to the southwest, creates a unique natural setting. This house is an important example of a high-Victorian country house in the Italianate architectural style rendered in a vernacular form. The stone house has a five-bay facade with a projecting frontispiece, containing the main entrance of wood paneled doors, a transom of colored glass and the etched initials of John Henry Smith. Paired round-headed windows above the center door and a smaller pair on the third floor are under a projecting gable, with a carved-wood verge board. The hip, patterned-slate roof has corniced edges of wood brackets, supporting the soffit. Four chimneys of quarry-faced stone, laid in random ashlar, project from each corner of the house and are decorated with pediment moldings along the stacks. The two flanking bays of the main facade have pairs of square-headed windows on the first floor and segmented arches on the second. The stone work is quarry-faced ashlar with projecting rusticated quoins and window surrounds. A projecting wing on the west side is capped with a gable. A wide bay window with a gable roof projects from the east side. The interior is laid out in a center-hall plan with an ornate wood staircase. The interior woodwork is walnut and oak, with carved mantels in both the east parlor and the dining room. The hallway and stairs are paneled in cherry. The wood windows have louvered shutters that fold into reveals matching the paneling of the windows and detailed baseboards are found throughout. The hall, east parlor and dining room have plaster moldings and plaster ceiling medallions. Elaborate cast-iron grills surround the radiators in each of the rooms. The original porch has been removed and a number of small additions have been made to the rear of the house, including a fire escape.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 291-293 Oxford Street – This home was built around 1880 and illustrates the typical broad bracketed eaves of the Italianate style. Fred J. Stone was one of the earliest occupants of this yellow brick house. He joined Wm. Stones Sons Ltd. in 1907 as manager of the Ingersoll branch. The operation started as a hide and wool business but soon developed into a fertilizer plant, later expanding to make livestock feed concentrates. In the 1920s, it passed into the possession of W.A.C. Forman, a family relative. At this time the house was divided to accommodate two units. His father owned the “FAIR”, a store at 126 Thames St. South which sold dry goods and household furnishings and utensils. It has a hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, and corner quoins.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville Book 1 – 86 Division Street South – 2-story brick house built in 1882 in the Italianate style, hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, dormer, cut field stone foundation, three large brick chimneys
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Listowel – 185 Binning Street West – Italianate with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, paired cornice brackets, balcony on second floor, cornice return on gable, built in 1872
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
London – Italianate style with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, pediment above verandah
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Lucknow Book – Mitchell – Italianate, cornice brackets, fretwork, decorative pillars on porch and pediment, 2½ story tower-like bay
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
New Hamburg Book 1 – 145 Peel Street – Italianate with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, wraparound verandah, decorative window voussoirs and keystones, single cornice brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 374 Fraser Street – Angus Block – 1914 – This building is noted for its parapet at the roof line and for its highly distinctive white stone window surrounds consisting of stepped lintels, quoined jambs and flat sills. Other notable features include the toothed heading of the in-stepped brick facing and bracketed canopy over the third-floor paired openings. The date stone indicates that H.W. Angus, an early architect in North Bay, was responsible for its design and erection.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 11 Little York Street – Italianate – buff-colored brick banding and keystones and voussoirs, paired cornice brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 44-50 Sparks Street at corner of Elgin – Scottish Ontario Chambers – Italianate design – four-story brick building with a high ground floor, balanced facade, decorative multi-colored masonry, radiated voussoirs of multicolored brick, fenestration (the arrangement, design and proportioning of windows and doors), roof line with heavy bracketing and decorated cornice
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 416 Warren Avenue – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, bric-a-brac on verandah
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 322 King Street – Ingleside – It was built in 1867 for Charles H. Carter and occupied by the Carter family for 118 years, including Port Colborne’s first mayor, Dewitt Carter. The two-story structure has projecting eaves supported by paired cornice brackets and corner quoins in dichromatic brick characteristic of Italianate architecture. Its rectangular plan with projecting frontispiece and hipped roof indicate it is a version of a house plan popularized by the magazine “The Canada Farmer” in 1865. The grounds are surrounded by a locally produced cast iron fence.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Shelburne Administration, Grace Tipling Hall, Police Station – corner of Main Street East and Victoria Street – Italianate style, paired cornice brackets, dichromatic brickwork, three-story tower with cap and cupola
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 94 Norfolk Street – Italianate style with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay topped with a cupola with iron cresting on top; decorative voussoirs and keystones
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Welland Book 1 – 221 Division Street – McCollum-Harcourt House – late 1870s – 2½ story stuccoed house, Italianate style – open verandah supported by wooden columns, double eave brackets, lacy verge board under central peak above a double semi-circular window
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
West Flamborough – Concession 2 – cornice brackets, corner quoins
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 3 – 3203 Peter Street – cornice brackets, decorative window hoods, ornate porch, dormer
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 40 Wellington Street South – c. 1874 – Italianate – L shape, two-story, buff brick with decorative quoins, trunked hip roof, large verandah with pediment above steps, Doric columns are supported on wood pedestals and turned balusters

Second Empire Architecture in Ontario – Top 32 Picks

Second Empire Architecture in Ontario

Second Empire, 1860-1880 – The mansard roof is the most noteworthy feature of this style and is evidence of the French origins. Projecting central towers and one or two-story bays can also be present.

Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Aylmer Book 1 – 445 Talbot Street West – mansard roof, iron cresting, window hoods on dormers
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 3 – 257 Bridge Street East, The Phillips-Burrows-Faulknor House – Glanmore National Historic Site – Harriet Phillips inherited this property from George Bleecker, her grandfather. Glanmore reflects the tastes of the well-to-do in late nineteenth century Canada. The grand house, built by local architect Thomas Hanley, was built in 1882-1883 for wealthy banker John Philpot Curran Phillips and his wife Harriet Ann Dougall, the daughter of Belleville’s Judge Benjamin Dougall. It is in the Second Empire style with mansard roof with elaborate cornices and brackets, dormer windows, iron cresting, a built-in gutter system, and multi-colored slate. The 9,000 square foot home cost $7,000 to build in 1883. The impressive suspended walnut staircase cost $62.50.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville – 181 King Street East – Gill House – 1878 additions of roof and wings – mansard roof, dormers, window hoods with keystones, iron cresting around rooftop balcony, central tower, bay windows
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Goderich – 20 Wellington Street South – The “Strachan House” was built by Adam McVicar, builder of the lighthouse, in 1880. A schooner brought 40,000 bricks to Goderich to construct this mansion for Donald Strachan, a prominent businessman. The Second Empire house features a mansard roof of patterned slate, and a tower crowned with iron cresting, and intricately molded window headings.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – Second Empire style – mansard roof, trichromatic tile work, window hoods on dormers, cornice brackets
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fisherville, Nanticoke, Selkirk Book – 27 Erie Street South, Selkirk – James Cooper built this house in 1870. In 1878 he sold it to George Hoover. The frame house has irregular massing and is in the Second Empire style. It has an over-sized horseshoe dormer with barge board and finial, elaborate window molds with pediments. The three-story tower has four dormers in the mansard roof. The Fess family purchased it in 1947.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cornwall – 36 Fourth Street West – St. Columban’s Rectory – Second Empire domestic architecture with mansard roof and detailing; window hood, trim on gable, bay window, cornice brackets; open railing on porch and wraparound verandah
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Eden Mills Book – Grand Central Hotel, Hillsburgh – 1880s – originally it was a carriage works, transformed into a hotel, served as a bank since the early 1900s – Second Empire – mansard roof with dormers, corner quoins, paired cornice brackets
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – 163 Jackson Street West was built for pharmacist/entrepreneur Tristram Bickle c. 1850 – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dichromatic tile work; ionic capitals on pillars, cornice brackets, corner quoins. Bishop T.B. Fuller moved here in 1884. From 1892 to 1932, Southam newspapers owner William Southam lived here. In 1954, Ken Soble launched CHCH TV here.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 3 – Mansard-roofed three-story tower – Frederick William Fearman was the son of a shoemaker who emigrated from England in 1833 with his parents at the age of eight. He started his business with a store selling smoked and salted meats on Hughson Street between King and King William, moved to a MacNab Street North location near the farmers’ market, and eventually expanded to become W. Fearman Packing Company Limited, with a large factory at Rebecca Street and Ferguson Avenue on the Grand Trunk Railway line. The company slaughtered, hung, salted, smoked and canned pork, beef, veal and lamb for shipment around the world. Fearman built his mansion, “Ivey Lodge”, at 90 Stinson Street in 1863. It is three-story, limestone block with a Mansard-roofed tower as its front entrance; it has bay and arched windows, dormers, verge board trim, and a green metal roof.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Jarvis – 45 Talbot Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dormers in roof, single cornice brackets, cornice return on small gables on window dormers
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 1 – 85 King Street East – 1877 – three story Victorian Second Empire style stone mansion – mansard roof, dormers, verandah, bay windows
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 5 – 116 Bagot Street – Second Empire, Mansard roof with dormers and window hoods, second floor balcony, bay windows, cornice brackets, dentil molding, pillared entrance
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville Book 1 – 76 Main Street East – Annabelle’s Tea House and Restaurant – Built in 1859 – Second Empire style – dormers with window hoods in mansard roof, paired cornice brackets. Anna Belle Miriah Brien Evans was Susanne’s grandmother, for whom tea was an essential part of her day. Tea time for her grandma was an institution. At 4 o’clock on a regular basis, she would proceed to the kitchen as if reminded by an internal clock. Susanne would get the small china tea set and set the table by the window in the dining room. There, as the sunlight streamed in, they would sip tea, have a biscuit, or two, and talk about the day. These are childhood memories that Susanne cherishes. In her honor, she created a place for people to spend time together and perhaps create lovely memories of their own. Tea time has a way of making an ordinary day an occasion.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Listowel – 469 Main Street West – Second Empire style, Mansard roof, dormers with window hoods, built of Wallace brick – was once on edge of town and operated as the Last Chance Hotel – last chance for a drink before leaving town
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 213-219 King Street – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers, dichromatic brickwork
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Morrisburg – 31 Lakeshore Drive – Second Empire style – projecting central tower, concave mansard roof, dormers; has eighteen stained glass windows, each with a different color scheme
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara-on-the-Lake Book 1 – 6 Picton Street – The Prince of Wales Hotel established 1864 – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dormers, window hoods, dichromatic brickwork, cornice brackets, second floor balcony
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 16-18 Wellington Street – King House c. 1888 – Second Empire style – large brick house, mansard roof, ornamental ironwork
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orillia – #84 – E.J. McCrohan, Harness Maker c. 1880 – Second Empire style, mansard roof, iron cresting around roof, finials on dormers, second floor balcony, corner quoins
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 1 – Wellington Street – Langevin Block – is an office building facing Parliament Hill. As the home of the Privy Council Office and Office of the Prime Minister, it is the working headquarters of the executive branch of the Canadian government. The building is named after a Father of Confederation and cabinet minister Hector Langevin. Built of sandstone from a New Brunswick quarry between 1884 and 1889 – Second Empire style – Mansard roof, dormers, grotesque sculptures (fantastic or mythical figures used for decorative purposes)
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 3 – 87 Willow Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, tall windows, dormers
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 26 Drummond Street West – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers with window hoods, tower, voussoirs and keystones, turned veranda roof supports with decorative capitals
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Perry – Corner of Water and Queen Streets – In 1840 Peter Perry purchased forty acres in downtown Port Perry and in 1844 he built a frame building which house a store, trading post, and a home for his agent, Chester Draper. Immediately after Perry’s death is 1851, the property was bought by Mason and Phillips who turned it into a hotel. Henry Charles purchased it in 1867. The present yellow building was built after the fire of 1884. The hotel had thirty rooms including a dining room and at the street level were two stores including a sample room where salesmen could display their wares. They named it the St. Charles Hotel after Henry Charles.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 217 Colborne Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dichromatic tile work
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 5 – 15 Welland Avenue – Second Empire – mansard roof with dormers with window hoods, three-story tower, pediment, cornice brackets, voussoirs and keystones
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 1 – 236 Jones Street East – Ercildoune was originally built as a wedding gift to George Carter’s daughter Charlotte when she married Henry Lincoln Rice in 1880. The home is built in the Second Empire style, a very rare style of home in St. Marys.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stouffville Book 1 – Main Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dormers with window hoods
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 299 Dundas Street – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dormers in roof, cornice brackets, two-story tower-like bays
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Wingham – Town Hall A.D. 1890 – Mansard roof, dormers, cornice brackets
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – 126 Graham Street – c. 1860 – Second Empire – symmetrical three-story white brick, mansard roof, dentils, decorative cornice with large brackets, two-story bay windows flank entrance, decorated cut stone lintels, rough faced stone lintels second floor, dormers have decorative wooden frames, large front door is flanked by transom and side lights, an open portico protects the entrance – now Park Place Retirement Centre
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 1 – 359 Downie Street – Second Empire style, mansard roof, window hoods, 2 story bay windows

Queen Anne Architecture in Ontario – Top 30 Picks

Queen Anne Architecture in Ontario

Queen Anne, 1885-1900 – This style is distinguished by an irregular outline featuring a combination of an offset tower, broad gables, projecting two-story bays, verandahs, multi-sloped roofs, and tall, decorative chimneys. A mixture of brick and wood is common. Windows often have one large single-paned bottom sash and small panes in the upper sash.

Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Amherstburg Book 1 – 199 Dalhousie Street – Bondy House Bed and Breakfast – Century old Victorian Queen Anne home, turret called “Widow’s Walk” for a great view, trichromatic siding
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville – 12 Victoria Avenue – tower, iron cresting; stone keystones and banding; verge board trim, finials; bay windows; veranda with Doric columns
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton and Bolton Book – 6012 King Road, Nobleton – Hambly House – c. 1884 – It was originally built of logs but was rebuilt after a fire at the corner of Highway 27 and King Road.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 5982 Culp Street – Francis Sherriff and Thomas Bright started the Niagara Falls Wine Company (Brights Wines) in Toronto in 1874. They moved to Niagara Falls in 1890 to be closer to their major source of grapes. This house was built for Francis Sherriff in 1894 for a cost of $4000.00. It is in the Queen Anne Revival style with an asymmetrical form, deep porch, and an irregular roof line which includes gables, dormers and a turret. The house exterior is brick with decorative cedar shingles on the turret and in the gables. The three-part window in the front gable is an adaptation of the Palladian style; the central section has a round headed window. The large wraparound porch has Tuscan style columns that rest on a brick base topped with a square stone cap.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – 38 Ridout Street West – Casa di Luca Restaurant – This two and a half story house was built in 1870 as the manse for the adjacent United Church. The front facade has gingerbread in the gable, small dentil trim under the eaves, and rough stone window surrounds; two-story turret with a cone-shaped roof.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt Book 1 – 22 Lansdowne Road North – verge board trim on gable, dichromatic brickwork, cornice brackets on bay window
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Eden Mills Book – Eramosa – turret
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fort Erie Book – Ridgeway – 348 Ridge Road North
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 5 – 252 James Street South – turret
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kemptville – 220-222 Prescott Street – de Pencier House – 1897- brick – tower, turret, iron cresting
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 1 – 95 King Street East – Hendry House – 1886 – high Victorian house in Queen Anne style – asymmetrical design, variety of roof heights and construction materials; terracotta (hard kiln-fired clay) panels; third floor sleeping porch, turret; dichromatic tile work
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara on Lake Book 2 – 177 King Street – The Romance Collection Gallery featuring the exclusive works of Trisha Romance and Tanya Jean Peterson
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oakville – 43 Dunn Street – towers, bay windows, balcony on second floor, cornice brackets – Cecil Marlatt’s estate
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 252 Metcalfe Street – Queen Anne Revival – built by lumber baron John R. Booth 1906-1909 – elaborately shaped gables, ornate stone molding, intersecting ridges of the roof
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Penetanguishene – 83 Fox Street – 1885 – home of Charles Beck and Amelia Dalms who had nine children (6 boys, 3 girls) – fretwork, turret, dormer, second-floor balcony, string courses wrap around the house; unique shape of window in gable
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 411 Greenfield Street – Town of Petrolia Municipal Offices – rose windows
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 326 Catharine Street – The Harvie House built in 1900, it is a typical Queen Anne Revival style home and has a wraparound verandah with offset circular tower, two types of siding and a pyramidal roof. The house takes its name from the Harvie family who owned it from 1911 to 1951.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 1 – 127 Christina Street South – Lawrence Family mansion – Mr. Lawrence was a lumberman – 1892
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 364 Colborne Street – old castle – four-story tower with iron cresting on top; iron cresting above ground floor bay window, elaborate cornice brackets
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 1 – 163 Church Street South – turret, dentil molding, dichromatic tile work, wraparound verandah
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Thomas – 1 Wellington Street, St. Thomas – built 1878 (McLachlin House) – turrets, scroll work, bracketing, dormers
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln Book – 5600 King Street West, Beamsville – The property was a Crown Grant of 52 acres to a loyalist from New Jersey named William W. Kitchen around 1790. He married Alice Beam and they had nine children. William and Alice’s youngest son, Jacob married Jane Dennis. Their only son, William Dennis Kitchen married Margaret Henry and built the house in 1885 on the bench of the escarpment, just west of the Thirty Mile Creek. The house was built with red bricks. The turret has square and rounded cedar shingles, topped with a finial. There are two tall corbeled chimneys, and a hipped roof with a flat belvedere. The gables have carved fretwork brackets and barge board. The tall bay windows are topped with segmental arches and decorative keystones. The front porch has an overhead balcony, and like the side porches, features turned posts, balustrades, spandrels and brackets. From 1999 to 2009, the house was owned and restored by Norman and Sherry Beal, who transformed the property into an estate winery. In 2009 Wendy Midgley and her husband Chef Ross Midgley purchased the Kitchen House and the Coach House from the Beals.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 289 Dundas Street
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterford – 3½ story tower
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Welland Book 1 – 24 Burgar Street – The Glasgow-Fortner House – 1859 – now Rinderlins Dining Rooms
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 404 Dunlop Street West – c. 1888-89 – Queen Anne Revival style – asymmetrical design – built for George Ross – Mrs. Ross was president of Whitby Women’s Institute and founder of the Victorian Order of Nurses in Ontario County.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 694 Victoria Avenue – Queen Anne Revival style with Romanesque influence, 1890-95; cone-capped turret, cyclopean stone detail (stone construction marked by the use of large irregular blocks without mortar), ornamental terracotta inset
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Wingham – turret, fretwork, voussoirs, keystones
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 36 Wellington Street North – c. 1854 -Queen Anne – full two-story with attic, red brick, gable roof, two hip roofs with dormers, two-story bay window with gable roof, verge board with pendant posts and large brackets, porch and balcony have turned posts, spindles, lattice and bric-a-brac, string course is patterned brickwork, six-sided two-story tower with steep hip roof topped with finial, paired post support gable roof side porch
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 – 1 Montebello Place – varied roof line, turret, wraparound veranda on two levels, Palladian windows in gables, dormers

Victoria British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 20 Picks

Victoria British Columbia Book 3

Victoria’s most distinct neighborhood geographically is James Bay, a peninsula with Beacon Hill Park on the east, the Inner Harbour on the north, Outer Harbour on the west and Strait of Juan de Fuca on the south. Compared with other neighborhoods in Victoria, James Bay is relatively flat, but undulates gently. The soil is predominantly deep loam except for a few outcrops of bedrock on the shoreline. Its only prominent watercourse was Providence Pond (near the corner of Oswego Street and Superior Street), a swampy lake emptied by a stream that flowed into Major Bay (where Fisherman’s Wharf Park is now).

British Columbia stands at the edge of a continent. Facing the world’s largest ocean, it is a province in continual transformation. The landscape has a natural diversity. British Columbia has deserts, alpine meadows, and coastal rain forests. It is the most biologically diverse province in Canada. Change is the only constant in B.C.’s natural history: A rain forest where a glacier once stood, a grassland that used to be a jungle.

North Park is one of Victoria’s oldest residential neighborhoods, and maintains its historical character of a diverse mixed-use community, bounded by Bay, Blanshard, Cook, and Pandora Streets. This is Victoria’s second smallest neighborhood, after Harris Green, at one square kilometer or about eighteen blocks. It is primarily a residential community, grounded by businesses, recreational facilities, and religious landmarks.

Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1002 Wharf Street – 1874 – The Malahat Building/Old Victoria Custom House was designated a national historic site in 1987 because: it is closely associated with Victoria when the city was the preeminent commercial center on Canada’s Pacific Coast; and it is a rare surviving example of a 19th-century Second Empire style federal building. As the customs house for Victoria from 1875 to 1899, the Malahat Building served the city’s import and export trade during a time when Victoria was the busiest center on the West coast. Mining licenses for the Klondike gold rush were administered here. Key elements which relate to the heritage value of the Malahat Building include its simple, centralized, block plan on a high basement; its three-story elevation, with a roof-top viewing deck; its three-bay facade with central entry; its Second Empire style, evident in the mansard roof, classicized decorative treatment, and hooded dormers; its restrained detailing, including a bracketed wood cornice, stone corner quoins, string courses, and cut-stone window and door trim with keystones; its solid brick construction on a stone basement; its broad view of the harbor.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1107-1125 Wharf Street – The Rithet Building is a three-story brick commercial building located on the east side of Wharf Street, facing the Inner Harbour. Built in four stages between 1861 and 1889, the Rithet Building embodies the early evolution of the city, and illustrates how new technology supported the growth of Victoria from fur-trading post to thriving commercial center. Its most notable feature is the decorative cast iron columns at street level, and pedimented window hoods on the second story. The columns were made in San Francisco on the earliest portion of this building, and this reflects the burgeoning trade links with the United States along the west coast of North America. The caduceus symbol located above each cast iron column on the storefront is another notable feature.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
601 Toronto Street – William and Margaret Garnham built 601, 603 and 609 Toronto Street in 1891-92 as revenue property. This is a one-story, cross-gabled Queen Anne cottage with a hipped roof on the rear behind the two side-gabled box bays. There are sandwich brackets in the eaves around the house, under the flat roof of the angled bay under the front gable, and in the frieze of the front porch. The porch has a flat-topped, hipped roof and two chamfered, bracketed square posts. The round-arched barge boards in the gables, connected by gable posts with drop finials, have triangular appliqués with circular cut outs. The porch roof and the three gables have fish-scale shingles, the house is clad in drop siding.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
609 Toronto Street – Mansard House – built 1891 – This house is a modest example of the Second Empire-style, distinguished by its mansard roof. There are three round-arched dormers in the mansard, two on the front and one towards the rear on the right side of the house. The mansard is shingled with a contrasting-colored band of fish scale shingles. There is a small iron balustrade on the flat-topped, hip-roofed, box bay window on the front facade. The front porch to the left side was enclosed in the 1970s. The roof of the bay and the porch also have fish scale shingles. The house was raised in 1932 to accommodate the full garage below; instead of the garage, there is now a basement-level suite. The mansard roof is now unique in James Bay, and one of only about four such residences in Victoria. Margaret Priscilla (née Reed, b. Quebec City 1840-1918) and William Garnham (b. Suffolk, England 1830-1908) bought this piece of Beckley Farm in 1890. William and second wife, Margaret, came to BC in the mid-1890s, and farmed in the Colquitz area of Saanich.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
627-629 Toronto Street
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
613 Avalon Street – 1890 – Rose Thorp is a 1½-story Queen Anne Cottage with a widow’s walk on its steeply hipped roof. It has a fretwork panel in the pedimented gabled dormer on the front; there are shingled, gabled dormers on the other three sides. A cutaway angled bay on the left front is crowned by a pedimented gable. Fish scale and diamond shingles in the gable frame a Moorish-arched, 22-paned window with pilastered casings. A box bay on the left side has a shallow hipped roof sitting on the main roof. A bracketed frieze below the eaves surrounds the house. Queen Anne stained glass borders many upper panes of the double-hung windows; the lower sashes are single-paned, the upper sashes have horns. The shallow, bell-cast, hip-roofed Eastlake entry porch on the right front has turned posts, ornate carved arches, and an unusual balustrade. The house is clad in drop siding and has two corbelled brick chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
619 Avalon Street – 1891 – This is a two-story, hip-roofed, cubical Italianate house with a two-story angled bay window on the right front and a one-story entry porch on the left with chamfered square supports and a decked hipped roof. There is a more recent one-story square bay window with a hipped roof on the right side, and a small gabled wing at the rear. It has closed eaves with a frieze board on the sides and vertical and diagonal board panels in front, and elaborate carved brackets all around. Most windows are one-over-one sashes with horns. It is clad in drop siding. The quietly imposing home conveys the material success of Frederick Jackson, co-owner of a drugstore, and his stature in the community as a celebrated athlete in baseball and rowing.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
624 Avalon Street – 1904 – This Edwardian Vernacular Arts & Crafts house was designed by Samuel Maclure. It is a characteristic 1½ story, steeply-pitched front-gabled house with a symmetrical upper story over an asymmetrical main floor. The front gable is separated from the main floor by a denticulated belt course. The main floor consists of a cutaway angled bay to the right of a recessed entry porch. The porch has three square chamfered posts and a closed balustrade. The house has a gabled full-height wing on the right side with a cutaway angled bay on the main floor; on the left side is a through-the-roof wall dormer with offset windows. Most of the windows on the house are six-over-one double-hung sashes with horns. The gables are shingled and the main floor is clad in beveled siding. There are two corbelled brick chimneys. Maclure designed this house to have only one finial in the front gable.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
634 Avalon Street – 1890 – Old Park Cottage was originally a one-story, hip-roofed Queen Anne Cottage; a large hip-roofed dormer was added on the left side in the 1980s. The house has a hip-roofed, angled, cutaway bay on the right front, and an original angled bay under the new dormer on the left side. The front door with stained-glass lights and transom window is sheltered by a small gable on brackets with a round-headed arch; the gable sits on the hip-roofed porch. The frieze is unusual in being coved and having a decorative metal trim along its lower border around the house. The house has one-over-one, double-hung windows, is clad in drop siding, and has a corbelled brick chimney. This house was built by carpenter/joiner John Nichols.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
146 Clarence Street – 1883, 1896 – This two-story Italianate house has a low-pitched, multi-hipped roof which culminates in a square flat roof. Its wide eaves supported by sandwich brackets surround the house. The cornice and frieze are metal, as is the flared pent roof between the upper and lower angled bays on the front left wing of the house. Using metal instead of decorative wooden shingles on an 1880s Italianate is unusual. There is an angled bay towards the rear of the main floor on the left side. To the right of the front wing is a wide entry porch with bracketed, turned posts and a pilaster, under a shallow hipped roof. The right side of the porch formed the original extent of the house. The two-story 1896 addition to the right of the porch has wide, shallow, square bays on the main floor of the front and the right side of the house. There is a chunky, cantilevered second floor bay on the rear. The three main floor bays all have hipped roofs.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
132 South Turner Street – 1890 – This house is unique in a streetscape of largely intact turn-of-the-century homes running though James Bay, a peninsula on the southern edge of downtown Victoria. This one-and-a-half-story wood frame house is particularly notable for its ornate Queen Anne elements. The character-defining elements include: complex roof lines, with steep pitch and side-facing gables; steep front-facing gabled dormer containing balcony with turned supports matching verandah below; decorative verge-board ends with segmental arch, and gable top filled with curved extension of barge boards and half-timbering; Palladian window with rectangular central panel on front dormer balcony, with two sash windows; full-width front verandah wrapping around one side, with slim, turned supports; decorative brackets with triangular cut outs on porch columns, echoing applied blocks on top window and barge boards; large octagonal bay on south side, within verandah; tiny shed roof with fish-scale shingles over north window; corbelled brick chimneys with chamfered corners and stepped bases; drop siding, and decorative shingles; front garden and fence.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
570-572 Niagara Street – 1908 – This is a two-story, bell cast-hip-roofed Edwardian Arts & Crafts house with widely spaced modillions in the eaves. The symmetrical upper front facade has a shallow, bracketed box bay with four double-hung windows; the lower is asymmetrical with a hip-roofed, cantilevered, angled bay on the left and side-facing steps leading to an inset open porch on the right with three chamfered square posts. The solid stepped balustrade of the stairs and the porch balustrade are covered in double-beveled siding. There are shallow box bays above cantilevered angled bay windows on each side of the house. The windows are all six-over-one with two diamond panes in the center of each upper sash; the muntins are wooden. The claddings are shingle on the upper floor and basement, with double-beveled siding on the main floor. There are two corbelled brick chimneys. The house is now duplexed.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
649 Superior Street – Robert Porter House Bed and Breakfast – 1897 – This symmetrical, 1½-story, gable-on-hip-roofed house has bell cast, hip-roofed extensions on either side towards the rear. The gables have turned finials. On either side of the centrally-located open porch are wide, shallow box bays, each with a bell cast, hipped roof. The shallow-hip-roofed porch has three chamfered square posts on each corner which are connected by heavy brackets supporting wide, flat arches below the frieze. The front gable has half-timbering on cedar shingles, the body of the house and the porch balustrade are clad in drop siding, the stair balustrade has vertical V-joint Tongue and Groove.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
626 Blanshard Street – 1876 – The Church of Our Lord is a Carpenter Gothic style wooden church with a separate annex called the Cridge Memorial Hall, located on the corner of Humbolt and Blanshard Streets. It is the oldest church in Victoria. Designed by architect John Teague, its simplistic vertical lines, steep gable roof, and board-and-batten siding distinguish it from the elaborate masonry churches nearby. The wood form of the Carpenter Gothic style is an excellent example of the adaptation of the classic Gothic style to suit local building materials. The Carpenter Gothic style elements which act as distinguishing features include the board-and-batten siding, vertical buttress piers, bell tower, rose window, and steep gable roof.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1600-1602 Quadra Street – built 1913 – This symmetrical, three-story, Classical Revival brick and concrete block edifice is dominated by its portico which is comprised of a modillioned, denticulated pediment above four cast concrete Ionic columns. The whole structure is raised a full story off the ground, and accessed by concrete block side-facing staircases on either side of a balustraded terrace. Three upper-floor, round-arched windows in the portico sit over pedimented entrances on the terrace. Slightly recessed, heavy corner blocks on either side of the portico continue around both sides of the building. All the windows on the upper floor are matching round-arched windows.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1611 Quadra Street – 1912 – This brick and stone church is a fine example of the Gothic Revival. Its picturesque asymmetry, steep copper spire, and window surrounds are details reminiscent of British architects of the Victorian era. It has a steeply-pitched, cross-gabled roof with parapeted gables; paired buttresses topped with tiers of stepped stone lead up to the front parapeted gable which sits high off the roof line. A small, five-sided bay with a conical roof is centrally located on the main gable below its windows. The eye is drawn to the slim, octagonal spire by tiers of paired, stepped, brick and stone buttresses on the square bell tower. The tower has two rows of large dentils above the vents for the bells. There are a multitude of Perpendicular Gothic arched windows with stone, quoined casings around the building. The southwest entrance has a steeply gabled roof; the north and south aisles have deep, shallower-pitched, shed roofs.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
612 David Street – 1885, 1891 – This picturesque brick church sits on the prominent intersection of Gorge Rd and David St. The style is varied with both Gothic and Romanesque elements, reflecting the two stages of design and construction. The gable to the right of the square tower is the original 1885 building, with its date stone in the gable above three Gothic windows which echo the lower ones. The main roof on the later 1891 building has an octagonal lantern with a row of arched windows to light the interior. The square tower has a denticulated cornice and elaborate parapet with an obelisk at each corner. The main entrance on Gorge Road, with its triple arches in heavily rusticated sandstone, is Romanesque; a low curved tower with conical roof is located to the left and a higher square tower to the right. There are many arched windows, often in groups of three, some two stories high. The gables of the main facade have geometric decoration in the upper areas.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
Hatley Castle is on the grounds of Hatley Park and Royal Roads University in Victoria, Vancouver Island, British Columbia at 2005 Sooke Road. James Dunsmuir commissioned Samuel Maclure, a Victorian architect, to design the Hatley House “Castle”, and Messrs. Brett and Hall, landscape artists of Boston, Massachusetts, to plan the gardens and surroundings. Local stone, trimmed by Valdez and Saturna Island sandstone was used in the building’s construction. Its impressive exterior is matched only by the lavishness of the interior appointments; oak and rosewood paneled rooms, baronial fireplace, teak floors, and specially made lighting fixtures. The building is 200 feet long and 86 feet wide; the turret is 82 feet high. The wall surrounding the estate was also built of local stone and cost over $75,000; the Conservatory, costing a like amount, was at one time filled with white orchids imported from India; a large banana tree grew in the center under the dome. The rooms of the house were filled with flowers from the Conservatory throughout the year. Ten kilometers of road interlaced the estate, and a hundred men were employed in the gardens. There were a number of other buildings on the estate to provide for the needs of the large household, but many of these have now been demolished. The “Castle” was completed in 1908, and the Dunsmuir family took up residence in that year.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
St. Ann’s Academy is a testament to the dedication of the Sisters of St. Ann who were integral to the beginnings of education and healthcare in British Columbia. Built between 1871 and 1910, as a school and convent. Now a national historic site owned by the Ministry Citizens’ Services, St. Ann’s remains one of Victoria’s premier landmarks surrounded by heritage gardens and greenspace to provide an oasis in the center of the Capital city. Once Victoria’s first Roman Catholic Cathedral, it was built in 1858 and moved and added to the school in 1886. Like the many rural French-Canadian churches, it is modeled after, it has ornate altar and ceiling carvings, gold-leaf detailing, original oil paintings, stained glass windows and a 1913 Casavant pipe organ. The resplendent Novitiate garden at the side entrance to the Chapel has a geometric herb bed, perennials and a recreated 1925 summerhouse. The 1910 formal garden at the north-west corner of the property contains rare trees and the remains of a unique fountain. The Public Works Department of the BC government purchased the building from the Sisters of St. Ann in 1974. A portion of the building (the Interpretive Centre) was restored to a 1920’s appearance while the majority of the building was converted into modern office space. The Ministry of Advanced Education leases the office space while the Ministry of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services operates the Interpretive Center, celebrating the history of this important landmark. The restored 1910 auditorium has also been restored and, along with 6 acres of grounds, is also available for public use.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
867 Humboldt Street – 1893 – Humboldt House is one of Victoria’s Historic Inns, has themed rooms — from “Edward’s Room”, to the “Gazebo Room”, and the “Oriental Room”. Antique furnishings, wood-burning fireplaces, framed jade art pieces, and wooden shutters set a very Victorian tone while the Jacuzzi tub, king sized bed and free Wi-Fi provide some modern elements.

Victoria British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 21 Picks

Victoria British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos

Victoria is the capital city of British Columbia, located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island off Canada’s Pacific coast.

The Carr House is where Emily Carr (1871-1945) was born and lived. She is a well-known author and one of Canada’s most famous painters. The house and its surrounding environment, and the impact they made in her life, are mentioned in all of Emily’s books.

The Empress Hotel, built 1924-1928, is a stone hotel prominently located at the head of the inner harbor in the city of Victoria.

Fort Victoria began as a fur trading post of the Hudson’s Bay Company and was the headquarters of HBC operations in the Columbia District, a large fur trading area now part of the province of British Columbia, Canada and the U.S. state of Washington.

The Parliament Buildings were built in two main stages, the first from 1893-98 and the second from 1911-16. The initial construction was a T-shaped building comprising the two arms of the facade and the legislative chamber in the stem to the rear. The later additions were an extension to the stem to house the Legislative Library, and two wings parallel to the stem. The style is an eclectic one that has been termed Late Victorian Free Style.

Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
207 Government Street – Emily Carr Home – This two-story Italianate Villa has a side-gabled roof with a central front-gabled projection creating a very formal balanced composition. The front full-length verandah is broken in the center by the entry above which, on the second floor, is a balustraded balcony. The balusters for both the verandah and balcony are pairs of fretwork “C” scrolls. The front windows are paired; the sashes of the upper windows are arched. The eaves have brackets and pendants. The gables have tall slender turned urn finials. There is a pair of twin-flue corbelled and paneled brick chimneys on the main ridge of the roof, and another at the rear. The right end of the house has a two-story angled bay, the left, a one-story angled bay with a balcony above. The entrance has a simple Classical sidelight and transom.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
721 Government Street – The Empress Hotel, built 1924-1928, is a stone hotel prominently located at the head of the inner harbor in the city of Victoria. Built for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), the Empress Hotel is one of a series of Chateau-style hotels built by Canadian railway companies in the early 20th century to encourage tourists to travel their transcontinental routes. Popular with the traveling public for their elaborate decor and comfortable elegance, these hotels quickly became national symbols of quality accommodation. The key elements of the hotel are its massive scale, stone and brick cladding, steeply pitched copper roofs, ornate gables and dormers, domed, polygon turrets, high-quality materials, and dramatic setting; its asymmetrical plan, with arcaded central loggia, and projecting pavilions accented by vertical strips of oriel windows; the presence of landscaped gardens around the hotel separate the building from the denser urban areas.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
One of Victoria’s most popular attractions is its historic Chinatown, once North America’s second-largest. In the late 1800s, Victoria’s Chinatown held the largest Chinese community in Canada. Many residents worked in BC’s gold fields and built the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1205 Government Street – This six-story building at 1205 Government Street and 612 View Street was built in 1912 by architect A. Arthur Cox for the Union Bank of Canada, which operated its main Victoria branch on the main floor and rented out office space on the upper floors.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
569 Johnson Street
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
581 Johnson Street – 1888 – The W.G. Cameron Building is a two-story brick commercial building located on the corner of an alley on the south side of the 500 block of Johnson Street. It is distinguishable by its decorative facade, intact cast-iron columns and wooden storefront, and a name plate bearing the name “W.G. Cameron” in its prominent cornice. The upper story has double-hung wooden-sash windows.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
571-577 Johnson Street – 1899 – It is a two story parged brick commercial building located on the south side of lower Johnson Street. Its segmented-arch upper-story windows are crowned by a corbelled cornice featuring a floral motif. Its upper-story fenestration pattern, with six two-over-two wood sash windows capped by inverted-U hoods, and its decorative cornice with floral medallions and decorative brickwork are character-defining elements.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
557-559 Johnson Street is a three-story Italianate brick commercial building. It was constructed in two stages in 1875 and 1886. It is a three-story Italianate brick commercial building situated on the south side of lower Johnson Street. It is the central building in a group of three structures which make up the Paper Box Arcade, a retail and residential complex in the Old Town district of downtown Victoria. Character-defining elements include the surviving original street-front facade with its upper-story fenestration, joinery, quoining, and decorative cornice; the composition of the storefront with two display windows flanking a recessed central doorway; and the pronounced stylistic differences between the second and third stories of the street front facade.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
550-554 Johnson Street – 1892 – The Strand Hotel is a three-story plus lower level, red-brick commercial building, distinguished by exuberant Victorian detailing and Romanesque Revival influences, and a projecting double-height central bay window. It is located mid-block on the north side of lower Johnson Street, within Market Square. Romanesque Revival influences include its round-headed windows united by rock-faced sandstone voussoirs; rock-faced sandstone lintels; and deeply-carved foliate sandstone capitals; additional exterior details include central double-height bay window clad in decorative sheet-metal with rectangular and round-headed windows; a broad, sheet-metal upper cornice incorporating a mansard roof profile; elaborate cast-iron roof cresting; red-brick roof line chimneys with corbelled caps; and round and square-sided cast-iron storefront columns stamped ‘Wilson Brothers, Victoria B.C.’ It is symmetrical with rectangular storefront openings; flat and round-headed openings on the front facade with double-hung 1-over-1 wooden sash windows.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
City Hall – 1890 – Second Empire architectural style
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1601 Douglas Street – 1912 – The Fairfield Block is a large, three story Commercial Style tan and cream-colored brick building prominently located on the northeast corner of Douglas and Cormorant Streets in the commercial core of downtown Victoria. This building is valued for its handsome Edwardian detailing, articulated by tan brickwork and cream-colored terracotta ornamentation, which reinforces the heritage character of the commercial streetscape of North Douglas Street. In partnership with nearby buildings of similar vintage such as the Hudson’s Bay Company Department Store (1914) and Hotel Douglas (1911), it is a good representation of the larger scale commercial buildings which transformed the City from a Victorian supply town to a modern Edwardian urban center. It has a prominent cornice, and grid-like fenestration pattern and paired double-hung wooden sash windows in the upper stories.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1450 Douglas Street – Hotel Douglas is a five-story Edwardian Commercial Style brick building located on the southwest corner of Pandora and Douglas Streets in the commercial core of Victoria. Hotel Douglas (1911) is valued as an early Victoria hotel, representing the seasonal population of the city in the early twentieth century. Historically, this hotel has played a significant economic role in the urban commercial area, providing both short and long-term lodging for people attracted by Victoria’s tourist attractions, as well as for workers enroute to logging camps or fisheries. It is significant that this hotel continues to operate at its original function. The building is an excellent example of a modest hotel built in the period of economic prosperity prior to the First World War. The architecture is a solid representation of the Commercial Style, which was used extensively in western Canada in this time period and contributed to the ideal of the modern imperial city. the brick cladding, terracotta decorative elements, the grid-like fenestration pattern, and the substantial cornice with dental molding are some of its character-defining elements.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
508 Douglas Street – South Park School – Built 1893-94 with an annex added in 1914 – This is a two-story, symmetrical, brick, stone and wood building. The main roof is side gabled with two prominent front-gabled wings at either end, each with wide, very shallow bays. The rear of each wing is also gabled. Heavy wooden barge boards and gable screens accent the front gables. Corners of the wings and the bays have stone quoining. The central roof line is broken by a Dutch-gabled, through-the-roof wall dormer which sits on the balustraded flat roof of the first-floor entrance porch. There are three front entrances: the main central entrance has a small wooden porch clad in drop siding under a pedimented gable; the two doors at the extreme ends are separated from the central porch by pairs of windows; the end doors and windows have quoins, and are all segmentally arched with keystones. The basement has large segmentally-arched openings and rusticated masonry around all four sides. The entrance on the left side of the building has an open wooden porch with square, shaped posts with brackets, and plain and fretwork balusters. Two massive corbelled and ribbed chimneys rise from the front of the main slate roof; all the roofs have terracotta cresting and finials.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
924 Douglas Street – completed in 1890 – St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church is a landmark red-brick structure, located at the corner of Douglas and Broughton Streets in downtown Victoria. The Church is notable for its prominent corner tower, which is situated at a bend in Broughton Street. The church displays a number of distinctive features, including crow-stepped gables, a variety of projections and towers, corner tourelles, and a picturesque roof line. Three sets of double entry doors are set in round-arched openings. At the rear there is a curved two-story projecting bay.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
924 Douglas Street – The style of St. Andrew’s is the Scottish response to the Jacobethan Revival in nineteenth-century England, and was a popular style for Scottish country houses. Drawing on the characteristics of fortified medieval tower houses and castles in Scotland, the style employs such elements as battlements, tourelles, and conical roofs as a declaration of national identity. Polychrome red and black banding demonstrates an awareness of contemporary architectural trends in England. There are stained glass windows on the side and rear walls, including the large rose window.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1314-1324 Broad Street – Duck’s Block is an excellent example of a large-scale Late Victorian commercial building. Constructed in 1892 for Simeon Duck, successful early local entrepreneur, MLA, and former Minister of Finance for British Columbia. This handsome Victorian building is a testament to the entrepreneurship of its original owner. Initially built as the home of Duck’s Carriage Works, and also used as retail outlets, entertainment venues, and early meeting rooms for the Knights of Pythias. This building is representative of the multi-functionality of Victoria’s commercial district in the late nineteenth century. Bold decoration and architectural solidity make Duck’s Block a dominant presence within Broad Street’s narrow streetscape. Bold Victorian detailing is seen in the arched windows on the uppermost story, the corbelled cornice detailing, and small triangular pediment above the cornice.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
The Maritime Museum of B.C. (MMBC) engages people with the maritime culture and history of the Pacific Northwest through rotating exhibits, educational and community-based programs, research services, and more. The Maritime Museum of British Columbia Society was registered in 1957 as a non-profit society. The Museum moved in 1963-64 to 28 Bastion Square in downtown Victoria. In 2015 the MMBC completed its relocation from its long-term home in Bastion Square to a Society Office in Nootka Court at 634 Humboldt St., with its collections being stored off-site in a climate-controlled facility. The Society Office houses exhibits that display artifacts from the collection, public research space, a gift shop, and staff offices.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
31 Bastion Square – The Board of Trade Building is a four-story office building located on the southern side of Bastion Square in the Old Town District. The building is a monument to the commitment of entrepreneurial order in the exuberant economy of late nineteenth century Victoria and British Columbia. Erected in 1892, it is a manifestation of the historic prominence and power of the British Columbia Board of Trade, which had administered local and provincial economic and commercial activities since its beginning as the Victoria Chamber of Commerce in 1863. The Board of Trade Building’s eclectic facade and imposing height contribute significantly to the heritage character of the Old Town District.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
31 Bastion Square – Designed by architect A. Maxwell Muir, the exterior decorative elements of this building illustrate the late nineteenth century tendency to portray grandeur and importance through the amalgamation of many styles of architecture such as High Victorian commercial design with decorative Romanesque elements, articulated by unique treatments of brick and stone work, and different fenestration patterns on each of the four stories; the symmetrical facade defined by bays and pilasters; the massive, rusticated sandstone base at the basement and first floor levels; the rounded archway entrance flanked by two Doric columns and stone carvings evocative of foliage; the unglazed terracotta used for decorative panels, low relief carving, and horizontal bands of floral ornament on the third floor and the fourth floor string course.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
501 Belleville Street – British Columbia Parliament or Legislative Buildings for the Colony of Vancouver Island were built in 1859 to the designs of German-born architect Herman Otto Tiedemann who created a series of five short brick and timber structures with low-pitched, bellcast roofs, reminiscent of Chinese pagodas, nicknamed the “Birdcages”. The Parliament Buildings were built in two main stages, the first from 1893-98 and the second from 1911-16. The initial construction was a T-shaped building comprising the two arms of the facade and the legislative chamber in the stem to the rear. The later additions were an extension to the stem to house the Legislative Library, and two wings parallel to the stem. The style is an eclectic one that has been termed Late Victorian Free Style. The facade is laid out in what is called a Palladian tripartite plan of a central block joined to two outlying buildings by colonnades, a Renaissance motif. Typical of much of the detail on the buildings is the prominent entrance with its concentric receding round arches supported on small ornamental columns. This is characteristic of Romanesque Revival style, derived from early medieval Norman architecture. A whimsical feature is the comic faces incorporated into the grotesques on many upper-story ornamental columns. The foundation and steps were of Nelson Island granite, the roof of Jarvis Inlet slate, and the exterior of Haddington Island andesite, rendered to a natural rock finish; local Douglas fir timber was used extensively. Marble finished the interior walls, stairways and floors of the Legislature.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
Victoria Centennial Fountain – activated August 2, 1962 – British Columbia was formed from four British colonies and territories: The Crown Colony of Vancouver Island 1849; The Dependency of the Queen Charlotte Islands 1852; the Crown Colony of British Columbia 1858; the Stickeen Territory 1862.

Victoria British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 18 Picks

Victoria British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos

Throughout the 1820s and 1830s, the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) was headquartered out of Fort Vancouver located on the north shore of the Columbia River. From there the HBC controlled nearly all trading operations in the region. The Fort’s influence reached from the Rocky Mountains to the Hawaiian Islands, from Alaska into Mexican-controlled California. At its pinnacle, Fort Vancouver managed over 34 outposts and 24 ports through 600 employees and six ships.

The American President (1845-1849) James K. Polk had his eye on the Oregon Territory and Mexican California. Polk encouraged large numbers of settlers to travel west over what became known as the Oregon Trail, then claimed the U.S. had a legitimate claim to the entire Columbia/Oregon district though was prepared to draw the border along the 49th parallel. The dispute was settled by the Treaty of Washington in 1846 which established the border between British North America and the United States along the 49th parallel from the Rocky Mountains to the sea, with Vancouver Island retained as British territory. The Treaty of Washington effectively destroyed the geographic logic of the HBC’s Columbia Department with Fort Vancouver as its headquarters. The Company subsequently moved its headquarters north to Fort Victoria in 1846, which had been founded three years earlier by James Douglas in anticipation of the treaty.

Fort Victoria measured 330 feet by 300 feet and had a single bastion in the southwestern corner near what is now Fort and Broughton. The fort was enlarged to accommodate more warehouses and a second bastion was built.

In 1849 the British government created the Colony of Vancouver Island. The HBC was given a 10-year contract to manage the colony, and James Douglas moved from Fort Vancouver to take charge of the operations.

Life at Fort Victoria was typical of most Hudson’s Bay Company posts. Men (mostly French Canadians) lived in large barracks. Local native people came to trade at the “Indian Store.” Furs from throughout British Columbia were collected and stored in large log warehouses. Small ships and canoes transported most of the furs and trade goods along the coast. Supplies and trade goods arrived once a year by ship around Cape Horn from England. Farms were established near the fort. Hunting, fishing and riding were the main pastimes of the men. Dances with fiddle music and occasional plays were some of the few entertainments.

Victoria is the capital city of British Columbia, located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island off Canada’s Pacific coast. Victoria is the southernmost major city in Western Canada, and is about 100 km (60 mi) from British Columbia’s largest city of Vancouver on the mainland. Named for Queen Victoria, the city is one of the oldest in the Pacific Northwest, with British settlement beginning in 1843. The city has retained a large number of its historic buildings, in particular its two most famous landmarks, Parliament Buildings (finished in 1897 and home of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia) and the Empress Hotel (opened in 1908). The city’s Chinatown is the second oldest in North America after San Francisco’s. The region’s Coast Salish First Nations peoples established communities in the area long before European settlement, which had large populations at the time of European exploration.

Known as “The Garden City”, Victoria is an attractive city and a popular tourism destination. Victoria is popular with boaters with its rugged shorelines and beaches. Victoria is also popular with retirees, who come to enjoy the temperate and usually snow-free climate of the area as well as the usually relaxed pace of the city.

Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1050 Joan Crescent, Craigdarroch Castle – . Porte-cochere entrance was the main entrance used by Joan Dunsmuir and her guests. The paneling and ceiling are believed to be western red cedar. The floor tiles come from the Minton tile company, England.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
The woodwork in the library is Spanish mahogany. The fireplace has the flue bent to go around the window located above the firebox. The portraits on either side of the fireplace are Joan and Robert Dunsmuir. Robert died in 1889 before the castle was completed. The cylindrical radiators on either side of the bay window are part of the house’s original heating system and were patented in 1874. The original stained glass in the bay window may have been chosen to depict the Dunsmuir’s Scottish and English heritage.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1069 Joan Crescent – 1913-1914 – This 2-story Craftsman California Bungalow style house has a low-pitched, front-gabled roof with open eaves and exposed rafter-ends, with two more front-facing gables and a gable on the left side, all with paired brackets and half-timbering in the peaks. There is a 2-story shed-roofed porch on the left front with paired, bracketed square supports at both levels, the lower ones on tapered granite piers; the top half of the porch has been walled and glassed in. Brick chimneys have a mixture of textures on each side, the left one with an alcoved fountain. The mix of rough “natural” materials such as random ashlar and shingle used to highlight the joinery of the porch and gable timber-work is typical of the style.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1070 Joan Crescent – 1913 – This hipped-roof Foursquare house has a 2-story, inset, full-width front verandah, the main floor now enclosed. It features an eclectic mix of two popular Edwardian styles, with Classical Revival modillioned enclosed eaves, paired Tuscan columns on the upper porch, and an entry door with oval glass and stained-glass sidelights. Craftsman features are the shingle siding, a bracketed and trussed gable and a massive granite wall and square supports on the lower porch, and a gabled front dormer with notched barge boards, brackets, and exposed rafter ends. Also, typically Craftsman are the three-square shingled bays with bracketed gables.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1401 Rockland Avenue – Government House is the office and official residence of the Lieutenant Governor and the ceremonial home of all British Columbians. The Honourable Janet Austin opens her doors all year to host celebrations, convene thought leaders and offer local residents and international guests with the opportunity to visit the beautiful gardens and attend tours. The house is located on the traditional territory of the Songhees and Esquimalt First Nations, in the heart of the Rockland neighborhood in Victoria, British Columbia. The Lieutenant Governor offers accommodation to distinguished visitors including members of the Royal Family, international royalty, heads of state and other honored guests of British Columbia. Since 1865, there have been three Government Houses on this site. The first official residence, known as Cary Castle, was built in 1859. Six years later it was purchased as the residence of the Governor of Vancouver Island.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1393 Rockland Avenue – 1912 – This British Arts & Crafts Tudor Revival house is Georgian Revival in its symmetry. Its main roof is flared and steeply hipped with a tiny, flared, hipped vent on the front. The front facade has two large, two-story, hip-roofed, box bays on either side of a large, elaborate, angled balcony over a deeply-recessed, centrally-located entry porch. The balcony balustrade repeats the pattern of the half-timbered belt which surrounds the house. The angled front porch is supported on octagonal posts with wide, shallow, curved brackets and solid shingled balustrades. The stair balustrades are also shingled. The two-story angled bay within the porch has windows with leaded art glass on both floors. The rear or garden facade also has two full-height, hip-roofed bays, but its faceted central balcony has been filled in. The shingled lower floor is separated by a belt course from the upper, which is half-timbered with smooth stucco. The windows are a mixture of leaded art glass and leaded multi-lights-over-one. The property retains its granite wall with large gate posts, wrought iron gates and railings. There are three tall, ribbed brick chimneys with heavy square brick caps; the one on the left is a through-the-cornice wall chimney.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1385 Rockland Avenue – 1911 – This two-story, slightly-flared-hip-roofed British Arts & Crafts house combines elements of both the Tudor and Georgian Revival styles. The modillions, the symmetrical upper facade, and the high belt course are Edwardian features. There is a one-story, hip-roofed box bay on the left side and at the rear, a shed-roofed projection. A large centrally-located, hip-roofed box bay on the front facade shelters the main entrance with its paneled door and double-leaded art glass sidelights. The square upper bay, with leaded art glass, is supported on substantial granite piers with heavy granite capitals. The stair balustrade is stepped and of granite, as is the foundation of the house. There is roughcast stucco and half-timbering above the belt course and on the upper bay, and shingles below. Windows are all multi-lights-over-one, and in groups. The tall, ribbed, brick chimneys are corbelled and have chimney pots.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1320 Rockland Avenue – Galt House at Gillespie Place – 1913-1914 – This stately mansion was designed by Samuel Maclure for Frederick Nation, a Manitoba department store owner and director of the Great West Life Assurance Company. Formerly called Highwood, it was re-named for a subsequent owner, John Galt, who commissioned Maclure to design alterations. It was divided into a 9-suite apartment in June 1943 by Miss E. Cherry.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1221 Rockland Avenue – 1911-14 – This imposing residence was built for Herbert Macklin, the assistant manager of Simon Leiser & Co. Ltd. It was converted to suites in the mid-20th century. At that time, the porch was closed in to provide more internal space. The original gates remain.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1171 Rockland Avenue – 1908 – Dundalk is a 2½-story Queen Anne house, with two gables on two sides of the building in an L-shape, a steeply pitched hip-roofed main block in the angle of the L, and a 3-storey polygonal tower on the outside corner of the main block.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1139 Burdett Avenue – Heritage Building – 1893 – The double front gables with huge perforated barge boards make this house one of Victoria’s best known and best loved Gothic Revival confections. The two steep, two-story bays are asymmetrical: the left one significantly more dramatic than its mate. Both units project slightly from the hip-roofed central core, with its Tudor arch and recessed porch. The ornate barge boards include flattened trefoils –a popular Gothic motif—and emphasize unique window treatments: Both upper window units have scalloped wooden appliqué elements, with applied shields. While the right-hand windows have decorative trim boards, the left-hand windows incorporate a narrow doorway onto a small balcony above a box bay.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
913 Burdett Avenue – 1904 – wood frame two-and-one-half-story English cottage style residence – Characteristics of the English cottage style include gambrel roof, double hung sash and casement latticed windows, corbelling under eaves, half-timbering, cedar shingles on lower level, hipped dormer, small gable extension over main entrance with squared wood posts and decorative brackets, box bay window, tall corbelled chimneys, and entry porch.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
923 Burdett Avenue – Mount St. Angela – This unique building plays a pivotal role in the Christ Church Cathedral precinct – even though only about one-third of the original plan was completed. Designed as a girls’ school in the Neo-Gothic ecclesiastical/collegiate tradition, it is arguably the best surviving building left by Victoria’s first significant architectural firm, Wright & Sanders. The 3-storey octagonal tower, originally intended to be secondary to a much taller bell-tower and steeple, anchors the front facade, leading the eye to the strong 2½-story front gable extension with its shaped parapet silhouette. The architects planned this extension, with steeply pitched roof and flared eaves as one of a pair. A shallow box bay in the center of this unit has stone columns leading up to a stone canopy that becomes the lintel for a two-light window with several decorative stone elements, including a central column with capital, springs, keystones, and trefoils.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
805 Linden Avenue – Heritage Building – 1910: The first resident was Charles Cross, a prominent real estate agent who served as president of the Real Estate Exchange, Board of Trade, and the Chamber of Commerce. This Edwardian Arts and Crafts residence has an attached conservatory to the south.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1012 Linden Avenue – Heritage Building
651 Trutch Street – 1910 – Swiss Chalet style. Front-gabled with a fairly low-pitched roof, it has wide eaves and a highly-decorated central balcony. There are heavy brackets at the eaves, and the rafter tails are exposed. The upper front is jettied over the main floor at both corners, supported by large brackets, giving the impression of box bays. Groups of three slightly chamfered square porch posts at the corners are linked by curved hoods. The large, open front porch leads to a central glazed entrance door with art glass side-lights. The lower front windows are in two matched groups of three and all are multi-pane over single-pane. Each side of the roof has a large gabled dormer, also with brackets at the eaves.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
609 Trutch Street – 1911 – Edwardian Four-Square is 2-storey with hip-roofed, a pair of cantilevered box bays on the front facade. The entrance porch is on the left side with front facing-steps. The entrance is recessed and modern metal railings are used at both upper and lower levels of the plain open porch. The lower section is shingled and the upper has half-timbering under bell cast eaves. A central hip-roofed dormer is pierced by a red brick corbelled chimney. Windows are multi-panes over single-panes in groups of three in the box bays and pairs above. The faux balconies are at odds with the style.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
725 Vancouver Street – Heritage Building – built in 1892 – It one of six extant examples of eight adjacent houses built at the end of the nineteenth century for British investor Hedley Chapman. The B.C. Land and Investment Agency, who at one time owned or controlled half the real estate in Victoria, acted as agents and arranged for the construction of the houses by contractors Bishop and Sherborne. In 1908, the property was subdivided into six lots, two houses were moved further down Vancouver Street, and the remaining six houses were sold. This cluster clearly illustrates the early speculative rental market, a trend begun in Victoria’s early building boom. All the houses are identical in size and layout but have subtle differences in architectural embellishments. The Italianate styling reflects the architectural tastes of the late nineteenth century, and these examples are more modest expressions of the villas owned by more affluent owners. The occupations of early residents reflects the growth of the middle class. This building was rented by a succession of women who ran a school for young ladies. Characteristics of the Italianate style include deeply-overhanging eaves with ornamental brackets, wooden arcaded porch, double-story box bay windows, prominent front entrance with wood stairs, decorative barge boards, and bands of fish scale shingles. There is an eyebrow window in peak of gable.

Vancouver British Columbia Book 5 in Colour Photos – My Top 9 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 5 in Colour Photos

Lynn Canyon Park – In the late 1800s, Lynn Valley’s centuries old Douglas fir and western red cedar were milled into lumber for export to Eastern Canada, the United States and Europe. Many of these trees were over ninety meters high and eleven meters in circumference. In the park, you can see some of the stumps from these huge trees.

Moderate temperatures and an average annual rainfall exceeding 150 centimeters provide excellent growing conditions. The lush second growth forest is good evidence of the productivity of the area. The large trees which now cover the part are on average only seventy to ninety years old. The forest is mostly Douglas fir, western hemlock, and western red cedar. Along the creek where flooding occurs, sitka spruce, cottonwood, alder and dense shrub undergrowth are found.

Lynn Canyon Park officially opened as a municipal park in 1912. The McTavish brothers, whose company originally logged the area, donated five hectares of land fronting on Lynn Creek. The District of North Vancouver added another four hectares. The suspension bridge was also opened in 1912; it hangs twenty stories (about fifty meters) above Lynn Creek. In 1991, the District of North Vancouver added 241 hectares to the park. The Park has many hiking trails.

Lynn Canyon Park is a coastal temperate rain forest with canyons, pools and creeks. There is a variety of local flora and fauna including 100-year-old Douglas fir trees with younger western hemlock and western red cedar and many types of moss below them.

Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Lynn Valley Suspension Bridge

Lynn Valley Ecology Centre – Ecology is the study of living systems in relation to one another and their environment. The Lynn Valley Ecology Centre features displays showing the interrelationships between plants, animals and man.

The high sub-alpine and alpine communities have been developing since the last glacial ice melted. Starting with rock, the actions of water, wind, heat and cold can produce soil, but very slowly. The addition of plants speeds up the process, then animals move in and ultimately a living community clothes the rock. At high elevations and on the steep slopes, the soil-building agents may, at the same time, work against the accumulation of soil. Broken rocks tend to roll to the valley floors, singly or as avalanches, fine matter may blow away in the wind or be carried by moving glaciers and running water down to lower levels. Anything that tends to loosen accumulating soils promotes erosion.

Even when the plants and the soils are established, existence remains precarious. The growing season is usually sort, and even during that time the temperatures are often low and the weather capricious. Plants grow were slowly.

The animals that live in the alpine, from insects to the big mammals, are directly or indirectly dependent on the plants, while on the other hand, their activities influence the vegetation. All the living things interact together in a system which is called The Fragile Network. Damage one part of the community and the whole community will feel the effects.

Since man has extended his operations to alpine heights, the living community is now also faced with grazing cattle, trampling human feet, all-terrain vehicles, and activities which involve the devastation by bulldozers, such as mining, logging, ski developments and communication stations.

We were in the area at the right time to tour Purdy’s Chocolate Factory. Richard Carmen Purdy’s love of chocolate created the beginnings of a tradition that continues to this day. In 1907 Mr. Purdy opened a tiny shop in downtown Vancouver on Robson Street. His reputation for making superb chocolates grew quickly, earning him the admiration of chocolate lovers throughout the city. Purdy’s Chocolatiers use only high quality, fresh ingredients. Two large melters contain 30,000 pounds each, and two smaller ones contain 10,000 pounds each. The pipes on the ceiling distribute chocolate throughout the factory. On an average day, Purdy’s goes through 10,000 pounds of chocolate.  Purdy’s roasts an average of 3,000 pounds of nuts per week. Each day the dairy delivers fresh candy cream and butter. Candy centers are cooked over an open flame up to temperatures of 240o. After cooking, caramels, fudge and brittles are poured onto steel tables for cooling.  The steel tables have water chambers that can be cooled or heated depending on the recipe. In an eight-hour day Purdy’s can produce over 3,000 pounds of caramel. Purdy’s shell molding Chocolatiers produce Hedgehogs, Melties and Smoothies. 72,000 Belgium Milk Chocolate Hedgehogs can be produced in a day.  Cherries are put in the glazer to evenly coat them. At the end of the tour, we arrived at the gift shop to make some purchases. The next day we visited Charlies Chocolate Factory, a much smaller operation but with a larger display store.

Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Fresh Roasted Nuts – Purdy’s sources the best nuts from around the world, India and Australia for example. Purdy’s roasts an average of 3,000 pounds per week. During Christmas, they roast 3,000 pounds per day.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Small chocolate eggs wrapped by machine in multi-colored foil
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Port Moody Station Museum is owned and operated by the Port Moody Heritage Society and is part of their effort to promote increased awareness and knowledge of Port Moody’s heritage and history. Exhibitions at the museum include the historic Port Moody Station, community displays and the Venosta, a restored 1920s rail car. The Port Moody Station, built in 1905/1907, was the second railway station built in the area. In 1945, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) decided to move the station closer to town. Their employees lifted the station off its foundation, placed it directly onto greased railway tracks and used an engine to pull it to its second location at the foot of Queen St. The station was officially closed on September 25th, 1976, when the CPR discontinued their passenger service. The Port Moody Historical Society who were operating a museum on Kyle Street, bought the station. In 1978, it was moved to its present location on Murray Street and refurbished to be a museum facility. The Port Moody Station Museum was officially opened on July 1st, 1983. The Station, designed to be a live-in unit, has two floors and a basement. The main floor is currently accessible to the public. Some rooms have been restored to show the living and working conditions in the station between 1905 and 1920. Other rooms have been set up for community and temporary displays. Plans are underway to open the upper level to show one restored bedroom and provide additional room for temporary displays. The kitchen, with a coal and wood stove, copper water heater, and coal-oil lamps predates electricity and piped-in water. The museum’s telegraph office features an operational telegraph system, which is available for guests to try, and a hand-operated telephone from 1884 when the Port Moody and New Westminster Telephone Company was formed.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3250 Kingsway – Sir Guy Carleton Elementary School
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3154 Kingsway
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
118 Regina Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
119 Regina Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
731 Columbia Street