September, 2017:

Aylmer, Ontario – My Top 10 Picks

Aylmer, Ontario – My Top 10 Picks

Aylmer is located in southern Ontario just north of Lake Erie on Catfish Creek.  It is 20 kilometers south of Highway 401. It is located on Highway 3 between St. Thomas to the west, and Tillsonburg to the east.

In October 1817, John Van Patter, an emigrant from New York State, obtained 200 acres of land and was the first settler on the site of Aylmer. During the 1830s a general store was opened and village lots sold.

Originally called Troy, in 1835 it was renamed Aylmer after Lord Aylmer, then Governor-in-Chief of British North America. By 1851 local enterprises included sawmills and flour-mills powered by water from Catfish Creek.

By the mid-1860s Aylmer, with easy access to Lake Erie, became the marketing center for a rich agricultural and timber producing area. Aylmer benefited greatly from the construction of the 145-mile Canada Air Line Railway from Glencoe to Fort Erie.

The coming of the Great Western Air Line Railway in 1873 encouraged manufacturing and mills, a foundry, a pork-packing house, a milk-evaporating plant, and shoe factory were among the main establishments. An Airfield for training was established nearby in World War 2 which became the nucleus of the Ontario Police College.

The Aylmer Canning Factory was established in 1879; it packed peas, beans, cider, pickles, vinegar, sauces, meats and fruits.

Imperial Tobacco Canada built a plant in 1945. At its peak, it employed more than 600 full-time and seasonal workers. In its prime, the plant could store 110 million tons of tobacco and had an October to April production capacity of 100 million tons. Of this, 20 to 25 million tons were for export to other countries, making it one of Canada’s leading exporters. The rest of the processed tobacco was shipped to Imperial’s cigarette production plant in Guelph. After declining tobacco sales in Canada, Imperial began downsizing in the 1990s and closed in 2007.

 

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

445 Talbot Street West – Second Empire style, mansard roof, iron cresting, window hoods on dormers – Aylmer Book 1

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

375 Talbot Street West – Italianate, cornice brackets, two-storey tower-like bays, balcony on second floor – Aylmer Book 1

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

Talbot Street West – Queen Anne style, turret,
trichromatic tile work – Aylmer Book 1

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

30 South Street – Georgian, belvedere on rooftop – Aylmer Book

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

52 South Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim – Aylmer Book 1

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

193 John Street South – Queen Anne style – c. 1899 – Ionic columns with scroll-like capitals – Aylmer Book 1

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

24 Pine Street – McLay-Minielly house built in 1853 in Classical Neo-Grecian (see Renaissance Revival style in appendix) architecture in frame construction of tongue and groove siding; entablature consisting of dentils, bands of moulding, frieze, and architrave; two-storey-high Doric pillars, pediment – Aylmer Book 2

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

150 Sydenham Street East – Italianate, paired cornice brackets, bay window, wraparound porch – Aylmer Book 2

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

111 Sydenham Street East – Queen Anne style, turret – Aylmer Book 2

Archtiectural Photos, Aylmer, Ontario

46 Talbot Street West – Aylmer Town Hall and Municipal Offices – clock tower, dormers, cupola, arched window voussoirs – Aylmer Book 2

Dorchester to Aylmer, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Dorchester to Aylmer, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Thames Centre is a municipality in Middlesex County located in southwestern Ontario a few kilometres east of London.  Communities in the township include: Avon, Belton, Cherry Grove, Crampton, Cobble Hill, Derwent, Devizes, Dorchester, Evelyn, Fanshawe Lake, Friendly Corners, Gladstone, Harrietsville, Kelly Station, Mossley, Nilestown, Oliver, Putnam, Salmonville, Silvermoon, Thorndale, Three Bridges, and Wellburn. Dorchester is the residential and commercial core of the township.

 

Mossley

Until 1840 the Mossley area was an untouched wilderness of pines, maples, and beeches.  The first settlers from England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales worked hard to clear the land for farming. They came with few tools but great hope for a better way of life, and they prospered.  In the 1800s this area was known simply as “The Corners”. In 1865 John Henry Amos opened a general store and was the first postmaster.  The name Mossley was chosen from two family names, the Mossips and the Lees. Mossley had a hotel, a cheese factory, a harness repair shop, and there were dressmakers and music teachers.

 

Malahide Township was named for Malahide Castle in Malahide, Ireland, birthplace of land grant administrator Colonel Thomas Talbot in 1810. The township comprises the communities of Candyville, Crossley-Hunter, Copenhagen, Dunboyne, Fairview, Glencolin, Grovesend, Jaffa, Kingsmill, Lakeview, Little Aylmer, Luton, Lyons, Mile Corner, Mount Salem, Mount Vernon, Ormond Beach, Orwell, Port Bruce, Seville, Springfield, Summers Corners and Waneeta Beach.

Architectural Photos, Dorchester, Ontario

31 Mill Road, Dorchester – Mr. Cartwright’s stone house built in 1866 with river and field stones with eighteen inch thick walls – Georgian style. There are ten main rooms. There is a “widow’s walk” or belvedere on the roof with a view of the river from windows on all four sides.

Architectural Photos, Dorchester, Ontario

15 Bridge Street, Dorchester – The Signpost – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables

Architectural Photos, Dorchester, Ontario

4026 Hamilton Road, Dorchester – Edwardian with Italianate features, two-storey bay window, pediment

Architectural Photos, Dorchester, Ontario

4088 Hamilton Road, Dorchester – Edwardian with two-and-a-half storey tower-like bay

Architectural Photos, Mossley, Ontario

5391 Elgin Road – Harrietsville-Mossley United Church – former Methodist Church – 1896 – Gothic Revival

Architectural Photos, Port Bruce, Ontario

Port Bruce – #3237 – built in 1854

Palmerston, Ontario – My Top 7 Picks

Palmerston, Ontario – My Top 7 Picks

Palmerston is located in Wellington County, west of Arthur, northeast of Listowel, and northwest of Kitchener and Waterloo.

The opening in 1871 of a station on the main line of the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway soon to be completed from Guelph to Southampton, provided the nucleus around which a community developed.  In its original concept the railroad was to run from Guelph to Harriston and would not have gone through Palmerston.  Listowel needed to be linked to the railroad and it was decided to bend the route toward Listowel.  It was also decided that a yard with maintenance shops would be needed.  As soon as the railroad decided where it would build, people started buying property around the area for businesses and homes.

Thomas McDowell was the first settler in 1854 on the site.  In 1872 McDowell and William Thompson who owned adjoining land, began selling town lots and by 1873 the community had 150 inhabitants.

In 1873 a branch line to Listowel was completed and a post office called Palmerston, named after Lord Palmerston, a celebrated English statesman, was opened.

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

Main Street – Gothic Revival, dichromatic brickwork, bay windows, corner quoins

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

Main Street – dentil molding, dichromatic brickwork

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

Bell Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim, fretwork

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

125 James Street

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

485 King Street – triple gable Gothic Revival, dichromatic brickwork, corner quoins, bay windows

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

725 King Street – Edwardian – Romanesque style window voussoirs, fretwork, pediment above verandah

Architectural Photos, Palmerston, Ontario

670 Yonge Street – Gothic Revival, corner quoins