Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 3 – My Top 9 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 3

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
254-258 Portage Avenue at Garry Street – The Bank of Nova Scotia – 1910 – The Bank of Nova Scotia is the only domed bank in the Prairie Provinces. Constructed in 1908-10, this was the first building designed as a bank to be erected away from “Bankers’ Row” on Main Street. The elegant facade is terracotta manufactured in England and hung on a frame of steel. There is exuberant detail. The sweep of the facade with its high dome and corner portal was an effective solution to the design difficulties of a narrow site. A 1930-31 addition matched perfectly the Baroque Revival detail and doubled the frontage on Portage Avenue. The building is a monument to the skill of its architects and the importance of banking to Winnipeg’s economy by the early 1900s.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
276 Portage Avenue – Completed in 1901, it was originally built for the Winnipeg’s Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA). As it was when it was created for the YMCA, the building included a rotunda, reading rooms, parlor, a 150-seat lecture hall, 600-seat auditorium, running track, gymnasium, recreation room, boys’ quarters, two meeting halls, classrooms, a library, boardroom and furnished bedrooms, showers, lockers and two bowling alleys. The building also featured Winnipeg’s first indoor pool. Birks, a company that designs, manufactures and retails jewelry, timepieces, silverware and gifts, acquired the building in September 1912. The building was changed to accommodate the jewelry store. Distinctive Renaissance Revival palace facades feature terracotta, granite, bronze and Tyndall stone. Above the third-floor openings are six terracotta medallions depicting the sources of the materials used by jewelers, with a seventh medallion on the north facade. The building retains many distinctive visual elements, including an overhanging decorative cornice, various window shapes, including rectangular on the main floor, arched on the second floor and small rectangular shapes in the attic story, all windows are outlined with distinct surround treatments. Decorative elements include quoins, niches, and an attic-level frieze. Terracotta color for the stucco areas contrasts with the cream-colored terracotta tiles.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
276 Portage Avenue detail – These medallions depict turquoise (representing semi-precious stones), an elephant (representing ivory), a Kimberley Negro searching for diamonds, a man diving for pearls, an oceanic wave delivering the riches of the sea (mother of pearl, coral and a tortoise shell), a precious metal-smelting gnome, and a silversmith surrounded by the tools of his trade. Above the medallions is a frieze depicting such characters and places as King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba, gates of Jerusalem, Hiram, king of Tyre, Negroes and an Indian, and the three wise men giving and receiving gifts. Alterations to the ground-floor show-window area in 1951 included a granite base and Tyndall stone facings surrounding the solid bronze show windows, as well as corner columns and vestibule walls lined with Travertine marble.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
515 Portage Avenue – The University of Winnipeg
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
287-291 Garry Street – 291 Garry Street – The North West Commercial Travelers’ Association Building a two-story brick and terracotta structure erected in 1908 and altered in 1914 and 1916 is a fine example of the use of heavily embellished terracotta and large windows to transform a small commercial structure into a stylish facility suited to upscale retail and service uses. The North West Commercial Travelers’ Association, a national organization formed in Winnipeg in 1882 to promote the interests of traveling salesmen, was an occupant of the site for almost half a century beginning in the mid-1940s. Key elements that define the building’s heritage character include its elongated rectangular shape, flat roof, and the symmetrical windows and central entrance of the main facade. The white terracotta ornamentation includes two fluted columns with plain bases and ornate capitals rising to a frieze with six lion heads and a parapet bearing urns and a prominent central shield with a cobalt blue crest. The front windows have decorative spandrels. Detailing includes delicate terracotta bands of intricately carved flowers, fruits and vegetables, terracotta scrolls, swags and shells.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
191 Lombard Avenue at Main Street(387 Main Street) – 1913 – Union Tower – Based on the Italian Renaissance style, the twelve-story skyscraper (tallest of Winnipeg’s early skyscrapers) uses pilasters which frame pairs of windows. The trapezoid-shaped lot gave the structure a frontage on Main of twenty-seven feet, extending one hundred- and one-feet down Lombard. The frame construction was clad in grey Kootenay marble on the lower two stories. The facade of the upper floors was clad in a light-colored terracotta. With the windows facing mainly south, the ground and mezzanine floors were lit by long, large windows. The upper windows form vertical bands between the piers to create a visual upward sweep. There is detailing around the windows in terracotta. The piers are plain but slightly beveled which makes the corner less obvious, and each terminates on a cartouche. The uppermost two stories feature paired arched windows superseded by a larger arch in a crowning burst of decoration. The Union Trust Company moved into its offices on the main floor of the building early in 1913. Trust companies act as trustees for estates and bondholders, handle transfers, and act as registrars and executors. Here large vaults filled with safety deposit boxes were located on the first and mezzanine floors. Trust companies encouraged savings and home ownership because patrons had their deposits channeled into long-term investments. Government and corporate bonds, as well as mortgages, were the principal domain of the trust companies. Financial institutions such as the Union Trust Company were partners in the development of the west through the granting of mortgages and bond issues that permitted cities and towns to finance improvements. Union Trust was one of many trust and loan companies operating in Winnipeg. It had its head office in Toronto and a second branch in London, England. The Winnipeg office handled all the western investments.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
191 Lombard Avenue detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
200 Cathedral Avenue – Université de St. Boniface – French University – With its magnificent Tyndall stone facade, the main building houses two gymnasiums, a fitness center, a library, a chapel, the Étienne Gaboury student center, the campus radio station, an amphitheater, computer facilities, a performance hall and an art gallery.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
219 Provencher Boulevard – St. Boniface City Hall, a three-story red brick structure built in 1905-06 when the predominantly French community of St. Boniface was an independent municipality, is an excellent example of a large civic structure designed to house expanding local government services at a time of rapid population and economic growth. The imposing, classically detailed, Georgian Revival-style building is centrally located on St. Boniface’s main business street. Key elements that define the building’s imposing exterior character and Georgian Revival style include the three-story rectangular block shape, symmetrically massed, with modest corner and central entrance pavilions, all of solid brick construction on a high limestone base, with a flat roof and parapet. The large square wood tower over the entrance pavilion, is organized into four classically ornamented stages beneath a domed metal-clad roof and tall flagpole, and features on all sides elliptical windows at the base and large circular analog clocks in columned and pedimented surrounds at the top. The large, mostly tall rectangular windows and transoms on the front (south), east and west facades are set in vertically aligned rows and flat-headed on all but the third floor where openings are round-arched with prominent keystones. The pedimented entrance pavilion has a two-story arched window, a stone architrave containing a double door flanked by paired Tuscan columns, a wide stone staircase with elaborate metal and glass lanterns crowning the pedestals, and side stairs that lead underneath to a basement entrance. There is a contrast of colors and textures, including red brick laid in a stretcher pattern with white mortar, rusticated and ashlar limestone and beige and brown paint. The cornices on the building and tower are prominent and modilioned; there are brick voussoirs, string courses and channeled brickwork; the tower has wood moldings, fluted columns and louvered openings beneath delicate scallop shells. There is a heavy stone lintel over the main entrance with the words ‘HOTEL-DE-VILLE’ and the date ‘A.D. 1906’ in the staircase pedestals.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
494 Taché Avenue – St. Boniface Museum – former convent of the Grey Nuns – oak log structure – Winnipeg’s oldest building – built for the nuns from 1846 to 1851 – Grey Nuns’ Convent National Historic Site of Canada is a gracious two-story hipped roof structure showing influences of Hudson’s Bay Company construction techniques in its squared log construction and European classicism in its symmetrical nine-bay facade composition with evenly spaced paired and shuttered casement windows. It has a central side-lit entry door, hip roof with dormers, belfry, and end chimneys. It faces the Red River and downtown Winnipeg and is an important element in the historic Roman Catholic ecclesiastical complex of St. Boniface. The building now serves as the St. Boniface Museum.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
450 Portage Avenue – Hudson’s Bay Company – It is a challenge to try to find a new use for the nearly empty six-story building at the corner of Portage Avenue and Memorial Boulevard. The key to redeveloping the building is in finding new tenants to fill the top four floors the Bay is no longer using.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 2 – My Top 11 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Book 2

The Exchange District is in downtown Winnipeg just north of Portage and Main. It derives its name from the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, the center of the grain exchange in Canada. The Exchange District is the historic center of commerce in Western Canada. The District developed from the banks of the Red River at the foot of Bannatyne and Dermot Avenues. Most commercial traffic came along the Red River from St. Paul, Minnesota where the nearest rail line passed. Goods were shipped to Winnipeg by steamer during high water in spring.

The Canadian Pacific Railway built its transcontinental line through Winnipeg which arrived in 1881. Thousands of settlers came west from Europe and Eastern Canada to farm the land. Winnipeg business developed quickly to meet the needs of the growing western population. The Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange was founded in 1887 and within a few years Winnipeg was one of the world’s fastest-growing grain centers. Winnipeg was also one of the largest rail centers in North America with twelve lines passing through the city by 1890 and there were over eighty wholesale businesses located in the District. Wholesale goods were shipped in from Lake Superior ports in the spring and grain was shipped out from Winnipeg to the Lakehead in the fall. The Exchange represented Canada throughout the world and it largely financed Winnipeg’s growth. Together with a strong world economy supported by an increase in gold reserves, the Exchange attracted many British and Eastern Canadian banks, trust, insurance and mortgage companies to the District to do business.

Through the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, the city was linked to other major financial centers of London, Liverpool, New York and Chicago. Most Canadian financial institutions established their Western Canadian headquarters in Winnipeg and by 1910 there were almost twenty banking halls and offices on Main Street between City Hall and Portage Avenue. Many Winnipeg-based financial companies were also established.

Some of the finest warehouses in North America based on an American Romanesque style can be found in Winnipeg. The Romanesque warehouses are typically of heavy wood post and beam construction with foundations of large rough-faced stone blocks set with deep, recessed joints (called rustication) and brick walls with piers and stone spandrels to support heavy loads. The Romanesque or round-head arch is used in the tunnels through the buildings which provided for protected loading and unloading of goods within, and in the large windows which provided natural light to the interior before electric light was affordable. At the turn of the century, Chicago was the center of North American architecture. Louis Sullivan developed the first steel frame and reinforced concrete buildings. Sullivan used stone and terracotta on the exterior, suspended by metal shelves bolted to the frame. He favored terracotta with simple details which complimented rather than completely covered the surface as in earlier heavily-detailed styles. John D. Atchison was the foremost Chicago School architect in the city.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
100 Arthur Street – The Gault Building is a six-story masonry warehouse with a flat roof erected in 1900 and expanded in 1903 in the Richardsonian Romanesque-style. Key elements that define the building’s style include the horizontal ordering of the three principal facades, expressed through distinctive materials and ornamentation, the symmetrical arrangement of multiple windows and banding elements such as the continuous rusticated stone sills on the second, fourth and fifth stories, the corbeled brick and stone cornice and the stone-capped parapet. The number, variety, size and treatment of windows, includes equally spaced rows of large flat-headed basement and ground-floor openings, repetitive vertical bays of second- and third-story windows topped by Roman-influenced arches, and bays of rectangular upper-story windows. The sash windows are in plain wooden surrounds, stone sills and lintels are rusticated; the interconnected hood-molding and corbeled brickwork are other features.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
70 Albert Street – The lively Victorian-era facades of the Telegram Building front the narrow-angled intersection of Albert Street and McDermot Avenue. The four-story brick structure, built in 1882, displays an Italianate style, which contrasts with the less ornate designs of adjacent buildings. Designed by Ottawa architect William Hodgson, the structure’s layered main facades are distinguished by their multiple arched windows, detailed brickwork and decorative entablature. The main facades are symmetrical with vertical and horizontal divisions created by pilasters and belt courses at all levels and the angled corner bay that connects the two elevations. The round-headed windows diminish in size and increase in numbers on upper levels and are finished by drip molding on the second and third floors. Details include slender pilasters with ornate capitals, voussoirs, richly detailed belt courses, ornate brickwork, and entablature.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
48 Albert Street – The four-story Royal Albert Arms Hotel is a brick, steel and concrete structure erected in 1913 and expanded at the front by a modern glassed-in café. It has a Spanish Colonial Revival-style front of brick and stone. The flat roof has a Spanish-style front overhang pierced by brick extensions of the corners and two interior bays and side and rear brick parapet walls. The main floor has ashlar stone cladding and arched window and door openings while the upper levels are finished in light brown brick and divided into five bays by the placement of linteled windows, two slight pavilions and a distinctive center section containing openings grouped in threes and wrought-iron balconies with large brackets on the third and fourth floors. The fine stone detailing, includes architraval-framed entrances with delicately carved ornamentation, a Manitoba coat of arms keystone and the name ‘ROYAL ALBERT’ in raised letters above the arched center window. Other materials and details are concrete lintels, sills and front string courses, the rusticated front fourth-floor brickwork, and the tall brick chimney.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
213 Notre Dame Avenue – – The Electric Railway Chambers is an eleven-story tall, elegant office tower constructed of steel, concrete and brick in 1912-13. It is an example of the Sullivanesque Chicago Style, a style characterized by its height, steel frame construction and abundant ornamentation. The terracotta-clad building was erected as the corporate head office of the Winnipeg Electric Railway Company, a regional force from 1892 until 1953 in providing power and streetcar service. Key elements that define the building’s style include the tripartite division of the primary facades into base, column and capital; there are piers and columns leading from the ground floor to the Venetian arches at the top of the building. The cornice projects and is elaborately decorated. There are large main-floor and smaller second-floor Chicago-style windows with heavy, elaborately decorated framing, while the upper-floor windows are paired and outlined with richly detailed surrounds. There is elaborate surface decoration throughout, including sculptural lions atop the piers, and twisted columns at the upper level. Thousands of white lights illuminate the engaged columns and arched sections at the top of the west and south facades.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
213 Notre Dame Avenue detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
228 Notre Dame Avenue – The Lindsay Building at the corner of Ellice Avenue, Notre Dame Avenue and Garry Street, constructed during a 14-month period between 1911 and 1912, was designed as an office building for entrepreneur Frank Lindsay. The building was located beside the Oxford Hotel, another property owned by Lindsay. Originally planned as a seven-story building, three additional stories were added to the plan after construction had begun. The building features reinforced concrete slab construction which was unusual at the time when steel framed buildings were common. The exterior of the building features a sheathing of cream-colored terracotta, cartouches, pilasters capped with Ionic capitals, as well as garlands of flowers around the semicircular second floor windows. The exterior is also ornamented with ten green wreaths bearing “1912” (the year of construction) as well as a pair of terracotta angel wings beneath each window, and five plaques identifying it as the Lindsay Building.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
228 Notre Dame Avenue detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
228 Notre Dame Avenue cartouches
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
120 King Street – The popular Kings Head Pub and Eatery is housed in a building erected in 1896 as a trading center for hides, wool and furs. In 1906 it became home to a German language press which published 20,000 copies of the paper Der Nordwestern weekly. After serving as offices for an airline and a radio and television wholesaler it became a restaurant in 1983.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
33 Princess Street at Notre Dame Avenue – Peck Building
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
72 Princess Street – The Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.) Hall, a three-story brick commercial building erected in 1883-84, anchors the southwest corner of the intersection at Princess Street and McDermot Avenue. It is a boxy brick structure in the Romanesque Revival style. The building has a flat roof and buff-colored brick walls. The elaborate wraparound entablature of pressed metal is adorned with brackets, crescent moons, clusters of seven stars, groups of miniature Corinthian columns, and the initials of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Manitoba Lodge No. 1 displayed in horizontal sequence from within square medallions. The vertical bays are separated by tall pilasters. The tall narrow rectangular windows are round-arched on the second level and Gothic-style on the third; they all have smooth-cut stone sills, radiating brick voussoirs and arched drip-molding. The main floor has a variety of window shapes and sizes. Other details include alternating panels of inset saw-tooth-patterned and raised brickwork, molded string courses, and belt courses of plain brick, and decorative capitals that extend the pilasters into the cornice.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
154 Princess Street – Findlay’s Stoves, Furnaces – The Hochman Building is the restored east facade of a modestly sized, three-story brick warehouse built in 1882 and now attached to a modern educational facility, Red River College campus. It is an Italianate-style commercial structure in the midst of a significant pre-1900 Winnipeg streetscape. Its richly detailed design by James Chisholm is visually related in scale, materials and style to its two flamboyant neighbors to the south, but with notable differences in fenestration, brickwork and ornamentation. Built for A. Harris, Son and Co. Ltd., one of the first Ontario farm machinery manufacturers to open a Winnipeg branch, the structure physically reflects the ebullience of its era and also recalls the early role played by agricultural interests in shaping the business district around City Hall. Key elements that define the facade’s animated Victorian-era Italianate design include the brick construction on a low exposed limestone foundation, and the three-story height topped by a flat roof behind a fanciful, oversized metal entablature and parapet.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
160 Princess Street – Exchange Building – The Exchange Building is the restored four-story east facade of a brick and stone office block erected in 1898 in the commercial district. It was built for the Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange. The structure’s grand design by Samuel Hooper is illustrative of the aesthetic transitions occurring in commercial architecture at the turn of the twentieth century. Its bold, eclectic exterior displays Classical and Romanesque influences. Key elements that define the facade’s imposing transitional design include its robust, symmetrical form, four stories high, with a flat roof and deep brick parapet. Its six bays are divided vertically by pilasters and horizontally into two distinct halves of rough-cut buff limestone below and vivid red brick with contrasting limestone coping, belt courses and lintels above. The Classical articulation of the center two bays are projected slightly in a pavilion beneath a large raised pediment, and include stone arch and oculi highlights over the fourth-floor windows, the words ‘EXCHANGE BUILDING’ is carved on stone panels, and there is a wrought-iron balcony and stone detailing. The many windows, some with transoms, and the large storefront openings are vertically aligned. The doorways are arranged asymmetrically with the main-floor arcade of stone arches, including the double-bay main entrances recessed at the north end and the single-bay entrance to the south. The walls are richly layered, and include terracotta patterning motifs, decorative moldings, string courses and other brickwork in the spandrels, entablature and parapet.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
160 Princess Street detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
242-248 Princess Street – The Bathgate Block, a three-story brick warehouse built in 1882-83, is a Romanesque Revival-style structure. It is located at the corner of Alexander Avenue and Princess Street. The key elements that define the style include the boxy rectangular mass of heavy mill construction with a raised rubble-stone foundation, brick walls finished in buff-colored brick, and a flat roof. The symmetrical organization of the three-bay front (east) and four-bay south facades, are defined vertically by stone and brick pilasters and tall windows, and horizontally by banding elements, including a metal main-floor cornice. The many round- and segmental-arched front and south openings include large main-floor doorways and display windows and elongated upper-level windows grouped in threes, defined by brick voussoirs and drip molding. The entablature and parapet are highlighted by courses of corbeled and diagonally laid brickwork and by round-arched panels with inset metal sunburst ornamentation centered over most bays. Details include the heavy rusticated stone sills of the front display windows, the smooth-cut upper stone sills, the channeled brickwork in main-floor pilasters, and the prominent pilaster capitals integrated with the main-floor cornice.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 1 – My Top 8 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 1

‘The Gateway to the West’ and ‘The Chicago of the North’ were two of the phrases used to describe Winnipeg’s future in the heady days of the late nineteenth century. Especially important in Winnipeg’s phenomenal growth was its role as middleman between eastern Canadian manufacturers and their new markets in what would become Alberta and Saskatchewan. As waves of homesteaders from central Canada and many European countries poured into Canada’s prairies, dry goods, hardware and groceries all became increasingly important for the consumers, the manufacturers and Winnipeg’s warehouse men and wholesalers, and it became increasingly important for Winnipeg’s wholesalers to have railway connections both to receive raw materials and stock and to ship goods to western markets.

Branch railway lines or spur lines, built to service the wholesalers were first constructed on the west side of Main Street near City Hall in the 1870s and 1880s. The warehouse district area grew rapidly, and Winnipeg hardware merchant J.H. Ashdown negotiated a spur line of the Winnipeg Transfer Railway in 1895 through the area immediately east of City Hall and Main Street. This line ran up the middle of the land between Bannatyne and Market Avenues and it was here that Ashdown built his large warehouse (157-179 Bannatyne Avenue) in 1896.

The Exchange District is a well-established and vibrant neighborhood in Winnipeg. It features a large and well-preserved collection of heritage buildings which include huge stone and brick warehouses, elegant terracotta-clad buildings, narrow angled streets and cobblestone paths. The Exchange District is an arts and cultural hub which features a thriving film, arts and music scene with many studios, art spaces, festivals and events.

The Exchange District is in downtown Winnipeg just north of Portage and Main. It derives its name from the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, the center of the grain exchange in Canada. The Exchange District is the historic center of commerce in Western Canada. The District developed from the banks of the Red River at the foot of Bannatyne and Dermot Avenues. Most commercial traffic came along the Red River from St. Paul, Minnesota where the nearest rail line passed. Goods were shipped to Winnipeg by steamer during high water in spring.

The Canadian Pacific Railway built its transcontinental line through Winnipeg which arrived in 1881. Thousands of settlers came west from Europe and Eastern Canada to farm the land. Winnipeg business developed quickly to meet the needs of the growing western population. The Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange was founded in 1887 and within a few years Winnipeg was one of the world’s fastest-growing grain centers. Winnipeg was also one of the largest rail centers in North America with twelve lines passing through the city by 1890 and there were over eighty wholesale businesses located in the District. Wholesale goods were shipped in from Lake Superior ports in the spring and grain was shipped out from Winnipeg to the Lakehead in the fall. The Exchange represented Canada throughout the world and it largely financed Winnipeg’s growth. Together with a strong world economy supported by an increase in gold reserves, the Exchange attracted many British and Eastern Canadian banks, trust, insurance and mortgage companies to the District to do business.

Through the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, the city was linked to other major financial centers of London, Liverpool, New York and Chicago. Most Canadian financial institutions established their Western Canadian headquarters in Winnipeg and by 1910 there were almost twenty banking halls and offices on Main Street between City Hall and Portage Avenue. Many Winnipeg-based financial companies were also established.

Most Victorian buildings in Winnipeg were later replaced by larger structures that would serve its expanding businesses. The Victorian grouping on Princess Street is one of the best examples of such buildings in Winnipeg while others can be found on Main Street north of the District. Many Victorian buildings are Italianate in style and are constructed of heavy wood post and beam (some including fireproof iron columns) with heavily detailed masonry load-bearing walls, variously arched windows and metal or corbelled brick cornices.

Some of the finest warehouses in North America based on an American Romanesque style can be found in Winnipeg. The Romanesque warehouses are typically of heavy wood post and beam construction with foundations of large rough-faced stone blocks set with deep, recessed joints (called rustication) and brick walls with piers and stone spandrels to support heavy loads. The Romanesque or round-head arch is used in the tunnels through the buildings which provided for protected loading and unloading of goods within, and in the large windows which provided natural light to the interior before electric light was affordable.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
181 Higgins Avenue – The Canadian Pacific Railway Station was erected in 1904-05 and it continued in use as a rail passenger terminus until 1978. Its monumental Beaux Arts facade, elaborate Tyndall stone decoration and extensive facilities reflected both the aspirations of the railway and Winnipeg’s place as the center of transportation and commerce in early twentieth century Western Canada.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
678 Main Street – The Dominion Bank Building is one of the first branches established by a chartered bank outside Winnipeg’s primary financial district, in this case to capitalize on commercial development near the Canadian Pacific Railway Station. It is an excellent example of Beaux-Arts Classical architecture applied on a reduced scale but still conveying an image of corporate tradition and solidity. An enriched facade made extraordinary by fluted Ionic columns and dark-hued terracotta, along with an ornate banking hall, express the building’s functional and symbolic importance and its aesthetic kinship with the monumental bank headquarters built in the same period further south on Main Street. It was occupied by the Dominion (later Toronto-Dominion) Bank until the early 1980s.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
456 Main Street –The Bank of Toronto is a three-story steel, concrete and brick structure erected in 1905-06 in Winnipeg’s financial district. It is an arresting Neo-Classical structure with a rare two-part facade of marble and cast iron. Key elements of the style include the basic rectangular form of steel, concrete and brick construction, three stories high with a stepped roof line reflecting the presence of a penthouse. The elegant front (east) colonnade is composed of four white marble Corinthian columns, the outer two square and smooth, the inner two round and fluted resting on shoulder-high bases and extending to a large decorative entablature with a modillioned cornice and a high segmented balustrade. The recessed cast-iron facade features elaborate main-floor screens encasing the entrance and windows, with the two upper levels separated by ornamental friezes and cornices and holding rectilinear Sullivanesque openings with top and side lights. The intricate detailing throughout includes cast-iron geometric designs, banding, panels, frets, floral elements, and marble egg-and-dart molding and beading.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
441 Main Street at Bannatyne Avenue – The richly appointed Imperial Bank of Canada, a three-story steel, brick and stone banking hall and office building erected in 1906, occupies an important corner site in Winnipeg’s historic Exchange District. The Imperial Bank is an exceptional version of the Classical Revival style, designed by noted Toronto-based architects Darling and Pearson. Key external elements that define the building’s rich Classical Revival style include its rectangular plan, three-story box-like form around a steel frame and flat roof embellished by a complete entablature with modillioned cornice and plain parapet. Grey Bedford, Indiana, ashlar limestone is used on the two primary elevations (south and west). The primary facade (west) is symmetrical and features a two-story recessed entrance bay framed by two massive fluted Ionic columns; there is a simple arrangement of windows on the third-floor level with small rectangular windows and side bays dominated by large mezzanine-level openings with elaborate pseudo-balconies (complete with balustrades, brackets, and pediments).
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
436 Main Street – The Bank of British North America, constructed in 1903-04, is a three-story steel frame, brick and sandstone structure with a one-story 1914 addition. To outshine the bank’s nearby competitors, architect A.T. Taylor of Montreal gave the building a grand Neo-Palladian sandstone front, complete with an Ionic colonnade and, for Winnipeg, a rare vermiculated (wavy lines or markings resembling the tracks of a worm) base. The impressive, highly visible edifice, long occupied by the Royal Trust Company, then by lawyers Newman, MacLean and Associates, retains considerable exterior design integrity while continuing in contemporary commercial use. Key elements that define the bank’s fine Neo-Palladian architecture include the elongated three- and one-story rectangular massing, with the main (east) facade of vermiculated and ashlar sandstone, the other elevations of solid brick and a flat roof, all around a structural steel frame.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
180 Market Avenue East at Main – The Winnipeg Pantages Playhouse Theatre is among the best of the vaudeville houses built in Canada between 1913 and 1920 and the first large concrete theater in North America. It was built in 1913. Key exterior elements that define the theater’s specialized Classical Revival (Greek Pantages) style include the rectangular box-shaped form, two stories high at the front and rising in stages toward the rear, constructed of brick and reinforced concrete and enclosed by mostly flat roofs. The front is symmetrically composed of a shallow central pavilion with small wings, and divided into two horizontal bands, with the second story clad in cream-colored terracotta and light buff brick and the street level clad with the same brick and smooth-cut limestone for the foundation. The metal marquee stretching across the front includes a central arch and keystone over the main doors. The second story’s five large windows are set in terracotta surrounds and panels, including three middle openings framed by engaged columns. The complete entablature includes a modillioned metal cornice, with terracotta panels that display the name ‘PANTAGES’ between the words ‘UNEQUALLED’ and ‘VAUDEVILLE’. The double entrance doors have transom windows. Ticket prices were 10¢ and 35¢ with 3 shows a day, 7 days a week. Usually there were six new acts a week and a typical day included a juggler, a song and dance team, an animal act, a comedy skit, a novelty of some sort, and a short film.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
223 James Avenue – Winnipeg Police Court – Built in 1883 at the corner of James Avenue and King Street, this two-story brick building contained eighteen jail cells adjacent to a large courtroom on the main floor, with offices for court officials on the second floor, and a full attic used as a dormitory for police officers. In 1908, when a new police station opened on Rupert Street, this building was renovated into municipal offices.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
115 Bannatyne Avenue – The Donald H. Bain Building – 1899 – is composed of two Romanesque Revival style buildings joined by a common wall – a five- and three-story brick structure. Features include solid brick-bearing walls with high rusticated stone bases and flat roof lines with parapets. The symmetrical front facade is divided into five bays by brick detailing and the placement of round-arched and lintelled windows, most of which have rusticated stone heads and sills. Details include the buff-colored brick finishes, fanciful straw basket and corbelled brickwork, thin spandrel panels, and brick drip molding. The round-arched openings have stone voussoirs and keystones on the front main and top floors. Brick pilasters, stone pilaster caps, and a heavily ornamented brick parapet with the date ‘1899’ carved into a stone panel are other heritage features.

Norwich, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Norwich, Ontario in Colour Photos

In 1799, the Township of Norwich was laid out by surveyor William Hambly into lines and concessions and 200-acre lots.

In 1809, Peter Lossing, a member of the Society of Friends from Dutchess County New York, visited Norwich Township. In June 1910, with his brother-in-law Peter de Long, purchased 15,000 acres of land in this area. That fall Lossing brought his family to Upper Canada. The de Long family and nine others soon joined them. By 1820 an additional group of about fifty had settled here. These resourceful pioneers founded one of the most successful Quaker communities in Upper Canada.

The township was divided into North and South Norwich Townships in 1855.

In 1975, Oxford County underwent countywide municipal restructuring. The Village of Norwich and the Townships of East Oxford, North Norwich and South Norwich were amalgamated to create the Township of Norwich.

Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
Stover Street – Italianate, hipped roof, two-story bay window, balcony above enclosed front entrance, corner quoins
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
70 Stover Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables, bay window
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
55 Stover Street – wraparound veranda, paired cornice brackets, decorative cornice, bay windows
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
8 Main Street East – designated – Moore, Chambers House – Gothic, verge board trim on gables, crenelated brick arched veranda with voussoirs and keystones, bay window on side, transom above door
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
16 Main Street East – Gothic – bay window
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
18 Main Street East – Italianate, paired cornice brackets, decorative cornice, corner quoins, pediment with decorated tympanum above Doric pillars, sidelights and transom surround door, bay window on front and side
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
25 Main Street East – Trillium Christian Retirement Home – two-story semi-circular veranda, bay windows, iron cresting, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
69 Main Street West – Italianate, dormer, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, pediment
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
78 Main Street West – Norwich United Church Manse – two-story white-brick manse was constructed in 1875 – a blocky, Italianate residence with symmetry of paired cornice brackets and twin round-headed windows and doors of second-story
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
90 Main Street West – Gothic

Otterville and Burgessville, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Otterville and Burgessville

The Township of Norwich is located in Oxford County in southwestern Ontario. Pioneering families emigrated from Norwich in upper New York State in the early 19th century. Oxford County Road 59 is the major north–south highway through much of the township, including the community of Norwich proper. The local economy is largely agricultural, based on corn, soybean, and wheat production with dairy farming in the north part of the township and tobacco, vegetable, and ginseng farming to the south. Slowly, ginseng and traditional cash crops are replacing the former cash crop – tobacco, as demand shrinks.

In 1799, the Township of Norwich was laid out by surveyor William Hambly into lines and concessions and 200-acre lots. The township was divided into North and South Norwich Townships in 1855.

In 1975, Oxford County underwent countywide municipal restructuring. The Village of Norwich and the Townships of East Oxford, North Norwich and South Norwich were amalgamated to create the Township of Norwich.

Norwich includes the communities of Beaconsfield, Bond’s Corners, Brown’s Corners, Burgessville, Cornell, Creditville, Curries, Eastwood, Hawtrey, Hink’s Corners, Holbrook, Milldale, Muir, Newark, New Durham, Norwich, Oriel, Otterville, Oxford Centre, Rock’s Mills, Rosanna, Springford, Summerville, Blows, and Vandecar.

Otterville is a village in Norwich Township in Oxford County. It is located on the Otter Creek. Otterville was settled in 1807. Encouraged by local Quakers, free blacks and escaped slaves fled persecution in the United States and found homes in the Otterville area beginning in 1829. Otterville African Methodist Episcopal Church and Cemetery served the local black community until the late 1880s.

Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 233 Main Street West – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roof, Romanesque-style window voussoirs
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – Main Street West – stained glass transoms
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 216 Main Street – dormers, sidelight
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 244 Main Street East – dormer in attic, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, dichromatic voussoirs
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 249 Main Street East – Gothic – verge board trim on gables
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 6 Dover Street
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 225422 Main Street West – Oddy House – constructed in 1861 – Also called Woodlawn Place which is associated with Thomas Wright, a local, prominent inventor who designed and lived in the building in the mid-nineteenth century. Wright was influenced by Dr. Orson Fowler, whose 1853 book, “The Octagonal House –A Home For All”, encouraged the practicality of octagonal dwellings. Fowler argues that these homes were easier to heat and made greater use of the sun’s rays. It is a fine example of the Regency Cottage style of architecture although its octagonal shape makes it unusual. The building is of plank construction with board and batten siding. The overall plan consists of a 45-foot octagon with a 20 foot by 20-foot wing that is situated to form a trapezoidal umbrage at the side of the house. Typical of the Regency style, Woodlawn Place features a wide roof overhang and deep fascia boards. The front door is flanked with sidelights and Doric pilasters, complimented by a simulated entablature above.
Architectural Photos, Burgessville, Ontario
Burgessville – Church Street – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Burgessville, Ontario
Burgessville – Church Street – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Burgessville, Ontario
20 Church Street – 2½-story tower-like bay, fretwork

Southwest Oxford and Norwich Townships, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Southwest Oxford and Norwich Townships, Ontario

South-West Oxford is a township in Ontario in Oxford County. A predominantly rural municipality, South-West Oxford was formed in 1975 through the amalgamation of Dereham and West Oxford townships and the village of Beachville.

South-West Oxford extends north to south from the middle of Oxford County along the Thames River/Highway 401/Woodstock-Ingersoll east-west corridor to the southern boundary of the county along the Delhi-Tillsonburg-Aylmer/Ontario Highway 3 east-west corridor. The northern boundary follows the course of the Thames River except where carveouts have extended the boundaries of Ingersoll and Woodstock into former township lands.

In its wilderness state, the former Dereham township had thousands of acres of swamp and marsh land which limited its use for agriculture. Several large drainage projects brought great improvement and remain as essential parts of the township’s farmland infrastructure. The township topography still has several large forested areas which are remnants of the original swamps on which drainage system runoff is concentrated.

At its north end, the township is underlain with an unusually pure limestone deposit centered between Ingersoll and Beachville that extends north-west through most of Zorra and south-east into Norwich. Open-pit mining of the limestone and kiln-firing to produce lime has been underway along the Thames River since pioneer days, and since the 1950s heavy industrial operations have led to nearly three thousand acres being licensed for extraction from pits more than 100 feet deep. The size of the limestone deposits is sufficient to support these operations for another century or more.

South-West Oxford includes lands in the former West Oxford township which were the earliest to be settled in Oxford County and also lands in the former Dereham township which were the last in the county to be settled. The greatest cause for slow growth in Dereham was the provincial government’s decision in 1799 to auction off all the wilderness land in the township in large blocks, which thereby fell into the hands of speculators who held the land dormant for decades.

The township of South-West Oxford comprises a number of villages and hamlets, including the following communities such as *Beachville, Brownsville, Brownsville Station, Centreville, Culloden, Delmer, Dereham Centre, Foldens, Hagles Corners, Mount Elgin, Ostrander, Salford, Sweaburg, Verschoyle and Zenda.

Salford is a small village along Highway 19; it is surrounded by agricultural land and the Oxford landfill to the east. There are two churches, and the Salford Community Centre with a ball diamond.

Sweaburg is located five kilometers southwest of Woodstock. Its main intersection is Sweaburg Road and Dodge Line (County Roads 12 and 41). It had a public school for students up to grade three until 2009, and currently has Sweaburg United Church and cemetery, a ball diamond, and a convenience store.

The Township of Norwich is a located in Oxford County in southwestern Ontario. Oxford County Road 59 is the major north–south highway through much of the township. The local economy is largely agricultural, based on corn, soybean, and wheat production with dairy farming in the north part of the township and tobacco, vegetable, and ginseng farming to the south. Slowly, ginseng and traditional cash crops are replacing the former cash crop – tobacco, as demand shrinks.

Upon his arrival in the province in 1792, the first proclamation issued by John Graves Simcoe, the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada while still at Kingston, announced the names and boundaries he had decided upon as political boundaries for Upper Canada. For areas lying to the west of Kingston, he decided that county names would be a “mirror of Britain”. To accomplish this, the sequence of names for counties along Lake Ontario became Northumberland, Durham, York and Lincoln, and for counties along Lake Erie, the names became Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex and Kent. (This was the same sequence of county names in place along the eastern seacoast of England, running from the Scottish boundary down to the English Channel.) The proclamation defined the northern boundary of Norfolk County as being the Thames River. Norwich and Dereham townships were originally within the land area designated as belonging to Norfolk County in Upper Canada, and were named after the towns of Norwich and Dereham in Norfolk County in England.

Governor Simcoe with several other government officers, guided by a party of Six Nations warriors, conducted a wilderness tour on foot up the length of the Thames River in 1793 and decided to assign additional place names to mirror those they knew along the Thames River in England. Middlesex County was the name assigned to the area around a town site reserved at the “lower forks” in the river, to be called London; Dorchester was the name for a town site at the “middle forks”, and the area around the “upper forks” was to be Oxford – the same sequence of names as found along the Thames in England. When legislation was passed in Upper Canada in 1798 to implement these new divisions, Norwich and Dereham were separated from Norfolk County and added to the new Oxford County, which included also Burford, Blenheim, Blandford and Oxford townships – names drawn from Oxfordshire in England.

Shortly after returning from this tour, in March 1793, Simcoe received a petition from Thomas Ingersoll and associates asking for grant of a township to which they promised to bring settlers from New England. The group was granted the township of Oxford-on-the-Thames. In order to bring settlers into the wilderness area township, a road had to be built from Brantford up to the Thames River, a distance of thirty miles (forty-eight kilometers), and Thomas Ingersoll arranged that work over the course of the next two years. The first ones to become permanently settled in the township were likely Samuel Canfield Sr. and his wife and sons, who agreed to make their new home into a half-way stopping point for travelers along the road, at what became known as Oxford Centre.

Beachville was the heart of Oxford County with settlement beginning in 1791.

The Bostwicks, Ingersolls and Canfields were New England families who had made their start in the New World in the 1600s, and frontier living had been second nature to them for generations.

Settlement in the former Norwich Township came more than fifteen years after Oxford Township. The Norwich settlement was founded by two men: Peter Lossing and Peter De Long. Both men were from New York. Peter Lossing’s house was the first one in Norwich. It now stands by the old Quaker Meeting House. Both men where Quakers. The town of Norwich began as a completely Quaker settlement.

In 1799, the Township of Norwich was laid out by surveyor William Hambly into lines and concessions and 200-acre lots. The township was divided into North and South Norwich Townships in 1855.

In 1975, Oxford County underwent countywide municipal restructuring. The Village of Norwich and the Townships of East Oxford, North Norwich and South Norwich were amalgamated to create the Township of Norwich.

Norwich includes the communities of Beaconsfield, Bond’s Corners, Brown’s Corners, Burgessville, Cornell, Creditville, Curries, Eastwood, Hawtrey, Hink’s Corners, Holbrook, Milldale, Muir, Newark, New Durham, Norwich, Oriel, Otterville, Oxford Centre, Rock’s Mills, Rosanna, Springford, Summerville, Blows, and Vandecar.

Architectural Photos, Sweaburg, Ontario
Sweaburg – 484526 Sweaburg Road – Greek Revival
Architectural Photos, Salford, Ontario
Salford – 313733 Dereham Line
Architectural Photos, Verschoyle, Ontario
Verschoyle – Culloden Line – two-storey bay window, fish scale patterning and semi-circular window in gable
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
Brownsville – Ontario Cottage with center gable
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
Brownsville – #14 – voussoirs, second floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
Verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
# 163576 – hipped roof, cornice brackets, dichromatic voussoirs, bay window with brackets, decorative porch
Architectural Photos, Delmer, Ontario
Delmer – 312281 Dereham Line – Delmer United Church – A.D. 1900
Architectural Photos, Delmer, Ontario
Delmer – 163942 Brownsville Road
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
Beachville – 584560 Beachville Road – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
Beachville – 434804 Zorra Line – Central Public School – Palladian window
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
584509 Beachville Road – trim on gables
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
584503 Beachville Road – hipped roof, dormers
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
Beachville District Museum – the former home of one of the managers of the Beachville quarry – The Downings
Architectural Photos, Oxford Centre, Ontario
Norwich Township, Oxford Centre, 714561 Middletown Line – Gothic – verge board trim on gable, corner quoins, dormers
Architectural Photos, Oxford Centre, Ontario
Norwich Township, Oxford Centre – 714516 Middletown Line – S.S. No. 5 – A.D. 1872
Architectural Photos, Springford, Ontario
Springford – 431 Main Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets, two-story bay windows

Zorra Township, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Zorra Township

Zorra is a township in Oxford County in south-western Ontario. A predominantly rural municipality, Zorra was formed in 1975 through the amalgamation of East Nissouri, West Zorra and North Oxford townships. It is best known for the Highland Games weekend held each summer in Embro, celebrating the heritage of the Scottish pioneer families. The township comprises the communities of Banner, Bennington, Brooksdale, Brown’s Corners, Cody’s Corners, Dicksons Corners, Dunn’s Corner, Embro, Golspie, Granthurst, Harrington, Harrington West, Holiday, Kintore, Lakeside, Maplewood, McConkey, Medina, Rayside, Thamesford, Uniondale, Youngsville, and Zorra Station.

Among the earliest settlers of Zorra Township, were United Empire Loyalists from the New England States. Zorra was first surveyed in 1820 and Embro became a separate municipality in 1858. Embro is located on a branch of the Thames River. The first buildings were two distilleries owned by McDonald and Crittenden.

Flour, grist and oatmeal mills were built. John McDonald built a carding and cloth factory. Businesses started up: watchmaker and jeweler, boots and shoes, eight blacksmith shops, wagon and carriage makers, tinsmith, carpenters, potash manufacturer, four general stores, two cabinet makers, undertaker, three doctors, and a pump manufacturer. In 1875, Embro had two newspapers, “The Planet” and “The Review”, with a third added in 1880, “The Embro Courier”. The Embro Public Library started as a Mechanics Institute in 1882; it became a public library in 1895.

Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
137 St. Andrews Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 114 Argyle Street – verge board trim and finial on center gable of Ontario Cottage
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 70 Commissioner Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 70 Ross Street – bay window
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 76 Ross Street – iron cresting above porch, trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 87 Ross Street – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roofs
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 109 Huron Street – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window
Architectural Photos, Medina, Ontario
Medina – Field stone, two-story bay window, corner quoins, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Kintore, Ontario
Kintore – # 195962
Architectural Photos, Kintore, Ontario
Kintore – Two-and-a-half-story bay window with verge board trim on gable, decorative cornice with brackets
Architectural Photos, Thamesford, Ontario
Thamesford – 109 Dundas Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets, two-story bay window
Architectural Photos, Thamesford, Ontario
Thamesford – #174 – two-story tower-like bay capped with a gable, fretwork
Architectural Photos, Thamesford, Ontario
Thamesford – #205 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, corner quoins, voussoirs over windows

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 2

Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
55 King Street West – Italianate – decorative gable and cornice with brackets
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
129 King Street West – paired cornice brackets, two-story bay
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
130 King Street East – decorative cornice on house and veranda
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
143 and 145 King Street East – Neo-Colonial style with gambrel roots
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
108 Church Street
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
90 Canterbury Street – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
112 Canterbury Street – Italianate – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window, second-floor balcony, transom window above door
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
44 Victoria Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial on gable
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
89 Ann Street – pediment with decorative tympanum, dormer with triple windows
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
140 Ann Street – 2½-storey bay with fretwork, semi-circular window in gable, enclosed sun porch on second floor
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
145 Ann Street – multi-windowed dormer, second-floor balcony, decorative cornice, Doric pillars supporting veranda

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 1

The town of Ingersoll is ten miles from Woodstock, twenty-one miles from London, and ninety-eight from Toronto. Ingersoll was incorporated in 1865, and by the enterprise of its inhabitants enjoyed a steady and progressive growth. Most of the town was built on the sides and summit of the high gravelly banks of the River Thames, which flows through it and supplies constant water power, of which due advantage was taken by several factories at the waterside. The town got its name from a pioneer family named Ingersoll, who were among the first settlers in this district and took a very prominent part in the early career of the community.

It was situated on the Great Western Division of the Grand Trunk Railway, and also on the Credit Valley Branch of the Canadian Pacific. The country around is fertile, and large quantities of cheese were shipped from here. The manufacture of flour and cornmeal, with woolen and planing mills, a tannery and four agricultural implement factories, formed its chief industries; grain, livestock, and general manufactured products, in addition to cheese, formed its chief shipments.

In 1886 a special effort was made to induce desirable factories to locate here and in the following year the John Morrow Machine Screw Works, the Evans Bros. and Littler Piano factory and the Hault furniture factory were secured by giving liberal bonuses. Later on, the St. Charles Condenser and the Ingersoll Nut Factory were opened.

Ingersoll was the first town in Canada to adopt the silica-barytic sidewalks in 1890 when a contract was given to Otto Guelich of Detroit, to construct a sidewalk on the east side of Thames Street from the Atlantic House to the Baptist Tabernacle, a distance of three blocks. In 1891 a local company was organized with Walter Mills as manager, and year by year the work has been carried on till now nearly every street on both sides has a nice, clean, smooth silica-barytic sidewalk, totaling about fifty miles.

Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
181 Oxford Street – This cement block house was built for R.A. Skinner who owned and operated Skinner’s Livery on the north side of Charles Street at the Oxford corner. Stained-glass panel on first floor window; pediment above porch with Doric pillars; a lion on either side of the front steps. This home was the scene of many elaborate house parties, the form of entertainment that made up the fabric of social life of the times. The Skinner Livery, sometimes referred to as the Bon Ton Livery, maintained vehicles for pleasure driving, business trips, weddings, funerals, etc.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
185 Oxford Street – This one-story Regency Cottage with a hipped roof is over one hundred years old. Its most attractive features are the front porch with the decorative fascia board, molded brackets and interesting railing construction and the two stained-glass panels in the front windows. This house was built for his sister by F. Richardson, lumber dealer and owner of a planing mill. He became involved in the lumber business around 1885 and erected or supplied lumber for many buildings in the area.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
189 Oxford Street – This large brick building, one of the older homes in this section of Oxford Street, was erected by the Christopher Brothers and occupied by Aaron Christopher for a number of years. The broad bracketed eave of the Italianate style was common in Ontario around 1860. The Christopher Brothers were well known Ingersoll contractors who built many structures, still in use in the Town (e.g. Daly House and the Anglican Church, as well as many quality homes). It has a bay window with three windows.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
213 Oxford Street – This dwelling, commonly referred to as the Gray House, was built in three sections. The angled window frame on the south side is typical of the architectural style of the 1850s and 1860s. It was purchased by Benjamin Gray in 1895 for $450.00 from John Hugi II, well known Ingersoll Photographer. At one time Benjamin Gray was the market clerk at the Town Hall and he also collected the rental fee, sometimes as low as $1.00, for the use of the auditorium. There is a cornice return on the large gable and on the pediment above the porch which is supported by square pillars.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
218 Oxford Street – This beautiful red brick home was built in 1896 for Henry G. Boyse. He owned and operated a farm near Verschoyle where he was born. Later he moved to Ingersoll and opened a flour and feed store at 70 Thames Street North. The roofing is the original Welsh Slate as is the iron work around the roof top and porch railing.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
244 Oxford Street – This white frame Victorian style house was built by Justus Miller in 1895. In the 1880s he and his brother became successful contractors for the Dominion Government, constructing such large public works as canal locks, docks, etc. After moving to Mount Elgin, he became engaged in the lumber business. The mass production of thin studs and joists replaced the massive timbers needed to frame a house. These homes were termed “Stick Style”. This house incorporated a whimsical tower, bay windows, interesting roof angles and a veranda with softly curved arches and fancy woodwork.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
250 Oxford Street – Decorative barge board (gingerbread), taken from designs found in windows of medieval churches, became a popular addition to houses in the 1860s. It was cut from three-inch-thick pine boards. The earliest barge board was more board than space but later took on a lacy look, indicating that this dwelling was built circa 1880-1890. The gables of this Victoria home are further emphasized by the addition of the finials. The original yellow brick has been painted.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
261 Oxford Street – This house built circa 1882 was one of the first to be constructed of the smooth red brick which became available at this time. The exterior walls were double bricked. Brick was also used for some of the interior wall construction which became apparent when a former owner removed two of the walls to enlarge a room. On the south side was a conservatory and green house which was replaced by a sun room. A dumb waiter, with several shelves and sliding glass doors, allowed food to be raised to the kitchen from the basement which was used as a cold storage. Originally the house had five fireplaces. Beautifully carved woodwork adorns the remaining mantles as well as the banister railing. Mr. Spencer Freeman was the original owner. Later C.W. Riley, a local cheese maker bought the property. He was the nephew of C.W. Riley Sr. “Cheese King of Western Ontario” and took over the ownership of Slawson’s Cheese Company, Ingersoll from his uncle. There is a two-story bay window; finials on gables.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
270 Oxford Street – The corner stone of this red brick Victorian home built in 1897 was discovered during renovations and bears the name “Buchanan”. The property was purchased in the early 1900s by Mr. & Mrs. G. Bartlett, clothing merchants in Ingersoll for many years. The home with its eleven-foot ceilings has four bedrooms, the original “maids” staircase and an elegant winding cherry staircase in the front hall. The fretwork design paneling and the beveled glass in the front door and in upstairs windows have been preserved.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
276 Oxford Street – Oxford Manor Retirement Home – This large yellow brick Italianate Villa style home was built circa 1880 by the Christopher Brothers and was the residence of Aaron Christopher. The design was introduced in England at the beginning of Queen Victoria’s reign as a model suburban housing for the rising mercantile class. Its main feature is the central Tuscan Tower with its tall rounded Italianate style windows and eaves.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
305 Oxford Street – This yellow brick Victorian home, built circa 1865, features a two-story detached barn where the original occupants stabled their horses and carriages. Mr. Richard Seldon and his daughter, Annie, who lived here from 1894 to 1967, served as Clerks for the Township of North Oxford. Between 1918 and 1967 residents came to the house to pay their taxes in what is now the formal dining room. High ceilings, elaborate moldings, wide baseboards and pine floors grace each of the formal rooms in the main part of the house. The brass chandeliers in the dining room and lower hall are original, as is the fireplace in the parlor. Molded cherubs decorate one of the two curved archways upstairs. The servants’ quarters were located in the rear portion of the house along with the summer kitchen which retains its original painted tin ceiling. The Seldon House with its triple brick exterior walls was built to last. It has paired cornice brackets, a second-floor balcony, and two-story bay windows.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
310 Oxford Street – This Neo-Gothic style home referred to as the “Gayfer House” was built in 1863 by Noxon. Except for the removal of a wrought iron fence bordering the street, the house from the front appears as it did when first built. In the early 1900s the rear wing was demolished and a sun room, pantry and rear vestibule were erected using the original brick. The three chimneys are chimney flues and ventilation chimneys. The original roofing was slate. Guy Lumbardo played in this house for the “Coming Out” party of Dorothy Gayfer with over two hundred invited guests. According to a granddaughter of John Gayfer, the tower was used for learning to smoke! The land and premises were purchased by Louise and John Gayfer (a well-known Ingersoll druggist) in 1881 and remained in the Gayfer family until the 1960s.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
316 Oxford Street – Many of the features of a Tudor style house have been incorporated in this home, including the patterned brick work, interesting chimney treatment, groups of rectangular windows, and complex roof line with many gables. Straight clean lines and design are typical. The home was built in 1937 and given to Harold and Lorna Wilson by his father E.A. Wilson as a wedding present. The Wilson family owned the Ingersoll Machine & Tool Company and were also involved in speed boat racing. In 1939 Harold won the President’s Cup with his craft “Miss Canada”, making the first time in U.S. boat racing history that the cup was won by a foreigner. Harold is included in the Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
189 Thames Street South – The Smith House – James Smith emigrated from Scotland in 1862. Shortly after his arrival in Ingersoll, he married Alice Galliford, daughter of John Galliford, Ingersoll’s first reeve. They moved into this house which was a small one-story cottage at the time. As the family grew to include nine children, a wing was built on the south side which included a kitchen and a dining room. A second story containing five bedrooms was also added. John admired the mansard roof line of the newly completed Niagara District Bank across the street and he incorporated a similar roof line in his second-story addition. When indoor plumbing was added, one of the bedrooms was converted into a bathroom.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
120 Charles Street West – dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
112 Albert Street – two-story frontispiece, iron cresting above entrance door
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
415 Harris Street – Elm Hurst Inn & Spa – 1872 – sidelights and transom windows surrounding double entrance doors, bay window, oriel window, tower, verge board trim on gables

Tavistock and Innerkip and Area in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Tavistock and Innerkip and Area

Tavistock is located 15 kilometers southeast of Stratford and five kilometers south of Shakespeare on County Road 59. In 1848, Captain Henry Eckstein founded Tavistock. The world championship crokinole tournament has been held here annually since 1999.

Innerkip is located on Oxford Road 29 north of Highway 401, northeast of Woodstock.

Huntingford is located on County Road 59, north of Woodstock, west of Innerkip.

Punkeydoodles Corners is located four miles east of Tavistock. Today the corner has a scattering of houses and farms. At one time it was a bustling stop along the Huron Road. The most popular legend about how it got its name is from the song “Yankee Doodle Dandy” which was popular in the 1800s and often sung around the piano at the inn and tavern located at the Corner during the late nineteenth century. Today, the corner is the meeting place of three districts – Oxford County, Perth County and the Region of Waterloo.

Hickson is located at the intersection of Highway 59 and County Road 8, about thirteen kilometers north of Woodstock and ten kilometers south of Tavistock. Hickson was founded in 1876 when the Port Dover and Lake Huron Railway created a whistle-stop here. The new village was named after Sir Joseph Hickson, the general manager of the Grand Trunk Railway.

Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
Tavistock – 52 Woodstock Street South – The Glass Swan – This late Italianate style has existed since 1892 when Dr. Otto Niemeier bricked over two adjoining structures. This residence is one of the oldest remaining in Tavistock and was the location of several early merchants and doctors.
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
#6 – paired cornice brackets under the eaves
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
#18 – Queen Anne style – three-story tower, Doric pillars supporting veranda with pediment
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
28 Hope Street West – hipped roof with dormer, pediment
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
44 Hope Street West – verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
# 45 – Hillcroft – A lovely yellow brick Queen Anne, with an interesting variation of roof pitches; beautiful Neoclassical pillar details
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
Yellow brick, two story – verge board, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
94 William Street – The Maples Home for Seniors – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers, drip molds and keystones, bay window
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
182 Blandford Street – built in 1867 – first owner Charles Vincent – two story frame house with a stone front and a decorative roof with dormers
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
172 Blandford Street – built 1855 – 2 story home with stone foundation, gingerbread trim on the center gable, a porch on each floor. The owners welcomed us, showed their home and shared a picnic lunch with us in their backyard.
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
134 Blandford Street – built 1880 – 2 story yellow brick with red brick corners quoins and red brick above windows, gingerbread trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
132 Coleman Street – Gothic – built 1888 – 2 story stone building, steel roof, verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
Two-story stone building with hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Huntingford, Ontario
Huntingford – Gothic Style, yellow brick, two story
Architectural Photos, Hickson, Ontario
Victorian style, 2 story, bay windows on lower level, yellow brick, balcony above porch, quoining, voussoirs, decorative brickwork
Architectural Photos, Hickson, Ontario
Yellow brick, two-story home with bay windows on each corner, paired cornice brackets under the eaves, hipped roof