Vancouver British Columbia Book 4 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 4

In 1858 the mainland of British Columbia became a colony with its capital located at New Westminster. British Royal Engineers surveyed the area under the command of Colonel Richard Moody. As private secretary to Colonel R. C. Moody, the Colony’s land commissioner Robert Burnaby displayed talents as an explorer, legislator and speaker. In 1859, when Moody received word from local natives that a fresh water lake existed north of New Westminster, Burnaby immediately volunteered for the survey party. Moody later named his discover Burnaby Lake. Pioneer citizens in 1892, named the thriving municipality Burnaby.

Burnaby is located within a large territory on the coast of British Columbia that has been the traditional home of Coast Salish peoples for thousands of years. Burnaby had resources that were harvested by First Nations, such as cranberries and large game, such as elk. By the 1890s, logging was a major industry in Burnaby with many sawmills processing lumber. Timber for ship masts was delivered to Ireland in 1865.

In 1891, the Westminster and Vancouver Tramway built an electric railway line between the two cities, and what would become Burnaby lay between the two cities. Initially, land was less expensive in Burnaby, but prices skyrocketed during the first real estate boom (1909-1912). In response to the growth of the community, a local police force was established, schools were built, and the business district grew. Many housing developments attracted people who wanted to live in the country and commute to the cities of New Westminster and Vancouver on the interurban trams.

Although the residential areas of Vancouver and Burnaby seem to merge, Burnaby has its own personality. Simon Fraser University is situated on top of Burnaby Mountain – from here you can gaze north to the waters of Indian Arm, a mountain-rimmed inlet of the sea.

Burnaby Village Museum represents a typical interurban community in British Columbia’s Lower Mainland region during the period of 1890-1925. Burnaby’s first European settler, William Holmes, came to East Burnaby in 1860. In 1891, an interurban line was opened between New Westminster and Vancouver, passing through what is now Burnaby. The convenience of this system encouraged more people to take up land in this area, and in 1892 Burnaby was incorporated as a municipality with about 250 people. Burnaby was a heavily forested area, and as the giant trees were cleared away, farms were established. Many Burnaby farms grew fruit and kept chickens and cows. By the early 1920s, Burnaby had started to change from a rural to an urban community. In 1992, Burnaby celebrated its 100th anniversary, and in that year became a city with a population of over 160,000.

Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Burnaby Village Museum “Elworth” – The rural setting near picturesque Deer Lake drew Mr. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and his wife Mary to this part of Burnaby. “Elworth” was built in 1922 as a country home for Mr. Bateman, an executive with the Canadian Pacific Railway. The house is on its original site. Mr. Bateman lived in this house with his second wife Mary, his daughter May, and his son Warren. Mrs. Bateman was an avid gardener. The house was named after the district in England where Mr. Bateman came from. The main floor of the house has been restored to its original appearance with a formal front room, an elegant dining room, and a cozy den where the family gathered to listen to the radio.
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Tom Irvine House – Tom Irvine and his friend Bob Moore built this small house in 1911 on Laurel Street in Burnaby; this was just west of Burnaby Lake near the tram line. Bob Moore died soon after but Tom lived in the house until 1958. Tom was a prospector in the Yukon. He helped build the Burnaby Lake tram line and railway trestles around B.C. Tom never married and died at the age of 100 in 1964.
Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Burnaby Centennial Park Carousel #119 was built in Leavenworth Kansas by C.W. Parker in 1912. It was operated in Texas from 1913-1915, was upgraded at the factory, and then it is thought to have operated in California. From 1936 to 1989, it operated at the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver. It was purchased, restored and donated to the City of Burnaby.
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Seaforth School opened in Burnaby in 1922 with twenty students. It was located on the north side of Burnaby Lake at Government and Piper.
Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
In our seats ready for class to start…
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Jesse Love Farmhouse – Believed to be one of the oldest surviving buildings in Burnaby, it was constructed in East Burnaby in 1893. Jesse Love (1849-1928) and his wife Martha (1858-1920) moved to Burnaby with their family in 1893 to start a fruit ranch and market garden. The original house was constructed by local builder George Salt and consisted of an entrance hall, dining room, lean-to kitchen, master bedroom, and an open area upstairs with a shoulder-height divider in the center to separate boys and girls. The original kitchen was a lean-to attached to the dining room. It is believed that the house was expanded and a kitchen built between 1907 and 1910 with most of the carpentry work being done by the oldest son, George Love. George owned a sash and door company and built many houses. The detailed casing work around the doors and windows in the kitchens show off his talents. Love also built several large boats which were used for family outings and hunting at Pitt Lake.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
7026 Patterson Avenue
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
4251 Victory Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Greta Street
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
5668 Chaffey Avenue
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
6450 Deer Lake Avenue – Robert & Bessie Anderson House – 1912 – Arts and Crafts style
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
6664 Deer Lake Avenue – Frederick and Alice Hart estate “Avalon,” now in used as the Hart House Restaurant, was built by local real estate agent F.J. Hart in 1912. Born on the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland, Hart came to New Westminster in 1890. He purchased this site in 1904 as a summer retreat for his family. The home is designed in the Tudor Revival style and has a massive tower with mock battlements, corbeled chimneys, cobblestone foundations and decorative half-timbering. When the house was built, it was in a quiet, rural community where people lived around the lake surrounded by a dense forest. The narrow roads that snaked through the trees towards New Westminster and Vancouver were rough and long; life was centered around the home and the immediate neighborhood of Deer Lake. People hunted in the forest, fished and swam in the lake, and grew most of their provisions in their own gardens.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
5725 Buckingham Avenue

Vancouver British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos

Vancouver, the largest city in British Columbia and the third largest city in Canada, is a sea port in British Columbia’s southwest corner sitting at the foot of the Coast Mountain range. Much of Vancouver is built on a peninsula surrounded by water.

Expo 86 was the biggest event B.C. had ever seen in 1986. The World’s Fair drew twenty-two million visitors to the north side of False Creek over six months. The infrastructure contributions from Expo 86 include the SkyTrain Expo Line, Science World, BC Place Stadium, Canada Place and the Plaza of Nations.

North Vancouver is directly across the harbor from the downtown area. North Vancouver is a thriving deep sea port and richly scenic holiday area. Here you can ride a gondola car up Grouse Mountain, or drive nearly to the peak of Seymour, but offering spectacular viewing and skiing sites. You can hike forest trails and enjoy a thrilling walk across a suspension bridge in Capilano or Lynn Canyon Park. Park and Tilford Gardens is a beauty. Seaside fun is available at the beaches.

West Vancouver is also clustered along the base of the towering Rocky Mountains. At Lighthouse Park you can see some of the largest trees on the west coast of Canada. Horseshoe Bay is a famous salmon fishing center. Here is the terminal of the B.C. ferries.

Richmond is located on two major islands at the mouth of the Fraser and is connected with Vancouver by a network of highways and bridges. The flat, fertile delta lands yield rich crops of vegetables and berries. Richmond includes the fishing village of Steveston, the home of much of B.C.’s commercial fishing fleet in the early 1900s. Richmond is also the site of Vancouver’s international airport.

New Westminster is called the “Royal City” because Queen Victoria selected its name. New Westminster overlooks the Fraser River just east of Burnaby. Irving House is a Victorian residence with an adjoining museum. Adjacent to the City Hall is the Garden of Friendship, a beautiful Park dedicated to its sister city of Moriguchi, Japan.

On Westham Island, to the south of Vancouver, is the George C. Reifel Waterfowl Refuge. White Rock is a town on a beautiful beach and is named for a huge rock landmark on the sands of Semiamhoo Bay. My Great Uncle Dick Todd lived in White Rock and we visited them there.

The towering North Shore Mountains which form a backdrop to the bustling city of Vancouver have beckoned outdoor recreationists for many years. Until the opening of the Lions Gate Bridge in 1939, a fleet of ferries transported hikers and skiers across Burrard Inlet on the first leg of their journey to Hollyburn Ridge, which is now part of Cypress Provincial Park. The park was established on October 9, 1975 and is 3,012 hectares in size. Bounded on the west by Howe Sound, on the north and east by the ridgetops of Mount Strachan and Hollyburn Mountain and to the south by West Vancouver, Cypress sits like a ship’s crow’s nest high above Vancouver.

On a clear day to the southeast snow-clad Mount Baker in the Cascade Mountain chain can be seen. To the west and southwest lie the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island with Georgia Strait in the foreground. The diversity of natural features, old-growth trees and outdoor recreation opportunities both summer and winter, is due partly to the climate of coastal British Columbia. The average annual temperature of around 9-10 degrees Celsius (49-50° F) results in many warm days for hikers and sightseers. “Cypress Mountain,” was the official freestyle skiing & snowboard venue for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic winter games.

Harry and I drove north to Britannia Mines for a tour of a closed copper mine. We had lunch at Kahlina Restaurant opposite Shannon Falls on Highway 99, just south of Squamish, where The Royal Hudson is the last remaining steam locomotive in scheduled service in North America. Between May and September, the Royal Hudson steams along the breath-taking beauty of Howe Sound between North Vancouver and Squamish. Whistler is located 120 kilometers (75 miles) north of Vancouver. We enjoyed the scenic two-hour drive which winds around Howe Sound and close to the Coast Mountain range. Whistler, in the heart of the mountains, is very scenic.

On the return trip, we stopped at Brandywine Falls with a 211-foot drop, with 600 cubic feet of water per minute falling over the falls at the heaviest season in early summer.  It got its name from the time when brandy and wine were bartered for guessing the height of the falls.

Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Lions Gate Bridge was named after two mountain peaks that look like sleeping lions.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
428 Fourth Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#320 – The Oscar Latham House, built 1909
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#407 – Dr. James Hatherly, Thomas H. Hatherly – built 1906
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#313 – Joseph J. Mahoney, built 1910
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#331 – The J. E. Brown House, built 1910
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Irving House is the oldest surviving intact house in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. It was built from 1862-1864 by Royal Engineers; it was built of California redwood in the San Francisco Gothic Revival style. At the time the house cost $10,000 to build which was the equivalent of a year’s salary for a very rich man. and was occupied until 1950 by the Irving Family.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Castle Coevorden is a replica of the Coevorden Castle in the Netherlands — the ancestral home of explorer Captain George Vancouver.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Guan Yin Buddhist Temple is the most authentic structure of traditional Chinese palatial (imperial) style in North America. Its design is based on the Forbidden City in Beijing, China. It features golden tiles on its two-tiered roof, flared eaves, and two scholar’s courtyards.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Snow Geese are snowy white with black wing tips.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
At Cypress Provincial Park we walked the trails to Point Atkinson Lighthouse. The added treat was to view a Pileated Woodpecker pecking away at a tree. Point Atkinson Lighthouse was built in 1912 with a hexagonal tower 18.3 meters high. This light is on the outer approach to Burrard Inlet. The flashing light and mournful fog horn are a colorful part of the history of West Vancouver.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
We had a ride to North Vancouver on the Sea Bus, a twin-hulled catamaran operated by Metro Transit as part of the city’s public bus system. SeaBus runs eighty trips per day. carrying thousands of commuters to City Centre across Burrard Inlet from downtown North Vancouver. We left from the old C.P.R. railway station, built in 1914, which now serves as a Sea Bus terminal at the foot of Granville Street, and arrived on the north shore. The trip takes fifteen minutes, including turn-around time. It was established in June 1977.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
SkyTrain was constructed in 1987 making it convenient to travel from North Vancouver (via SeaBus) through downtown Vancouver to Surrey stopping at four stations in Burnaby.
Architectural Photos, Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
West Cordova Street – Canadian Pacific Railway Station – Neo-Classical building built between 1912 and 1914 (third building on this site) – Behind the colonnade of Ionic columns is an impressive lobby with panels depicting landscapes seen from trains as they traveled across the country.

Vancouver British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos

Vancouver is the largest city in British Columbia. It is a sea port in British Columbia’s southwest corner sitting at the foot of the Coast Mountain range. Much of Vancouver is built on a peninsula surrounded by water.

Vancouver is a city with a view. It has a natural harbor, a backdrop of rugged mountain peaks, a forest-like park, sandy beaches, you can ride a gondola car up Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver, and you can fish for salmon. You can drive almost to the peak of Mount Seymour for beautiful views and skiing sites. Vancouver is Canada’s third largest city.

Robson Square is located in the heart of downtown Vancouver; it was designed by Arthur Erickson and houses a Law Courts building, office space for six hundred government employees, and the City’s outdoor ice-skating rink. The three-block development has a rooftop reflecting pool, three waterfalls, a foot bridge, a man-made mountain, and many trees and shrubs.

We drove up Mount Seymour to the bottom of the ski slopes (the end of the roadway) where the elevation is 1,016 miles.

Canada Place resembles an enormous ocean liner with its roof of billowing sails. Canada Place represents many stories, such as, Indian legends, shipwrecks, cruise ships, Vancouver’s history and beautiful scenery, freight and cargo, exports and imports, Vancouver and Canada’s development in world trade. Canada Place is the terminal where cruise ships dock. It was built for Expo 1986 and is a dramatic structure with its distinctive sails. Underneath is the Vancouver Trade and Convention Centre.

Granville Island incorporates everything from the theaters to a popular public market. Located at the south side of False Creek under the Granville Street Bridge, Vancouver’s Granville Island Public Market sells fresh vegetables, fresh fish, meats and other groceries and plants. The Island is home to several restaurants as well as a marina. Access from downtown is via the Granville Street Bridge.

Queen Elizabeth Park was once a quarry. From its location on Little Mountain, there is a fine view of the city, mountains and sea. Rolling lawns and gardens are interspersed with winding paths to enable enjoyment of colorful flower beds. The dome of the Bloedel Floral Conservatory is a beacon to lure park visitors to view an assortment of tropical and semi-tropical plants.

Stanley Park at the western end of the city is a thousand-acre wilderness crisscrossed by walking trails and bounded by an eleven-kilometer seawall. Indian carvings on the totem poles tell their enchanting tales with each figure, animal and head depicting some phase of life or belief of the early coast Indians.

Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
837-857 Hamilton Street – Hamilton Street Victorian Homes – These four homes date from when Vancouver was less than a decade old and new homes such as these filled the neighborhood all the way to Granville and Hastings Streets. Each was built in the Queen Anne style, three in 1893, with the newer 1895 Alex Gibson house displaying fine mill work in its gables.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
509 Richards Street – The eight-story Lumbermen’s Building, originally known as the North West Trust Company Building, is a reinforced-concrete commercial structure with terracotta ornament, built in 1911-12 and located on Richards Street south of West Pender Street in downtown Vancouver. It is a good example of the Edwardian Commercial Style, which was the decorated version of the Commercial Style, in which the elevation is treated in three parts – a base and a cap, both of which are finished in ornamental terracotta; and a five-story, relatively plain brick-faced ‘shaft’ between them. The decorated facade contrasts with the plain, brick treatment of the other three elevations. The character-defining elements of the building include: the simple, point-tower massing built flush to the sidewalk and lane; the classical terracotta ornament on the ground floor, including the Doric columns and pilasters supporting a frieze and cornice; the column bases, the arched surrounds on the outer bays; the recessed panels between the mezzanine windows, and the narrow frieze above the mezzanine floor; the terracotta ornament of the top floor, including the segmental-headed windows, decorative frieze, strong cornice, and dentils and brackets below the window sills; the uninterrupted brick piers and recessed spandrels of the intermediate floors; the terracotta capping to the parapet on the south elevation; the terracotta window sills on all the elevations; the plain brick walls on the side and rear elevations.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
1120 Mole Hill – Mole Hill is a heritage housing community in the heart of the West End. It sits in the block framed by Thurlow, Pendrell, Bute, and Comox Streets, two blocks north of Davie Street and one block west of Burrard. This 170 unit unique and complex project involved the restoration of 26 City of Vancouver-owned heritage houses on an entire city block in the heart of Vancouver’s densely populated West End. The homes include some of the oldest structures remaining from early Vancouver history. This significant heritage resource had been under threat of demolition for many years. The heritage interiors and exteriors of the houses were preserved; each of the houses was raised, adding proper foundations and an additional story; the houses were adapted to include energy efficient heating systems, storm water management and re-use of heritage features. Mole Hill now houses low-income singles and families, as well as market tenants, in studio, one, two- and three-bedroom units. Along with the century-old houses, the project also preserved many of the site’s mature trees. The public space of the Mole Hill block was reconfigured to include community gardens, pathways, benches and a water feature. The introduction of traffic-calming features in the lane way protects the safety of residents and introduced a pleasant walkway for the entire community. Awards for Mole Hill include the 2004 Heritage Canada Award, the 2004 City of Vancouver Heritage Award of Honour, the Canadian Construction Association’s 2004 Environmental Achievement Award and a 2006 CMHC Housing Award for Best Practices in Affordable Housing.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
750 Hornby Street – Vancouver Art Gallery – It was the former Vancouver Court House.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
5668 Chaffey Avenue – our lodging during our stays – with brother and sister-in-law
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Pink dogwood
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada Place is located at the south foot of Burrard Street opposite the Waterfront Centre Hotel and adjacent to the Pan Pacific Hotel. The Waterfront Sky Train Station is close by.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Burrard Street Bridge
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Queen Elizabeth Park is located at the city’s highest point providing a panoramic view of Greater Vancouver and North Shore Mountains. It is the city’s first Civic Arboretum.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Fountain at Queen Elizabeth Park
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Stanley Park Totem Poles
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
‘Girl in Wetsuit’ represents Vancouver’s dependence on the sea
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Replica of the figurehead of the S.S. Empress of Japan which plied these waters for thirty-one years 1891-1922 carrying Vancouver’s commerce to the Orient.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The H.R. MacMillan Planetarium is designed in the shape of the cedar hats worn by the Coast Salish people.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The St. Roch, a short, two-mast schooner, was a Royal Canadian Mounted Police ship with eleven crew. It was the first vessel to travel from the Pacific to the Atlantic through the fabled Northwest Passage, and the two perilous voyages made by the little wooden ship maintained Canadian sovereignty over the Arctic islands. It was built as an Arctic supply and patrol ship the R.C.M.P. bases up to Coppermine. It was in service for twenty-six years. There is only a four-month time period when the ice was open (not frozen).
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Museum of Anthropology, located on the cliffs of Point Grey, with a display of Northwest Coast First Nations art is housed in the award-winning glass and concrete structure designed by architect Arthur Erickson which was inspired by the traditional post and beam architecture of North West Coast First Nations People. Pottery, dolls, carvings, wooden musical instruments, lead glazed earthenware tiled stove and Chinese ceramic dishes were on display.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Spirit of Haida Gwaii: The Jade Canoe – 1994 – Artist: Bill Reid – Dimensions and materials: Bronze cast with a jade green patina – at Vancouver International Airport – Often described as the Heart of the Airport, this acclaimed sculpture was inspired by nineteenth-century miniature canoes carved in argillite, a soft sedimentary rock that is found near Skidegate on Haida Gwaii. As with many historic examples of miniature canoes, this vessel is crowded with creatures and beings, their identities drawn from legends and oral histories of the Haida, and their forms energetically and sometimes fiercely interacting with each other in the manner of rivalrous siblings.

Vancouver British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos

Vancouver, the largest city in British Columbia and the third largest city in Canada, is a sea port in British Columbia’s southwest corner sitting at the foot of the Coast Mountain range. Much of Vancouver is built on a peninsula surrounded by water.

Downtown Vancouver sprawls out from Granville and Georgia Streets. North America’s second largest Chinatown stretches along Main Street and three blocks of Pender between Gore and Carrall Streets.

The central peninsula is the commercial heart of the city where office towers, shopping centers, condos and hotels view for views. At its northern reach, the stylized sails on the roof of Canada Place just into the harbor. West Georgia is the main artery through city center. Howe Street north of Georgia is the city’s financial heart, home to the Vancouver Stock Exchange. South of Georgia, between Hornby and Howe, the Vancouver Art Gallery fronts Robson Square and Arthur Erickson’s glass-enclosed Law Courts. Granville around Robson is a pedestrian mall with fashionable stores, movie theaters, clubs and concert halls. The eastern end of Georgia Street, near the coliseum-shaped Vancouver Public Library, is the theater and stadium district.

Gastown is the historic core of Vancouver, and is the city’s earliest, most historic area of commercial buildings and warehouses. The Gastown historic district retains a consistent and distinctive building form that is a manifestation of successive economic waves that followed the devastation of the Great Fire in 1886, the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1887, the Klondike Gold Rush and the western Canadian boom that occurred prior to the First World War. The Byrnes Block embodies the sudden influx in investment capital that flowed into Gastown based on the certainty of growth promised by the arrival of the transcontinental railway. This building, and the Ferguson Block located across the street, are among the oldest extant buildings in Vancouver that are still standing at their original location; only the relocated Hastings Mill Museum building is known to predate them.

The Byrnes Block is the site of the Alhambra Hotel, located on the upper floor, a representation of the area’s seasonal population in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hotels provided both short and long-term lodging, serving primarily those who worked in the seasonal resource trades such as fishing and logging. Many of these hotels had combined functions of commercial services on the ground floor and lodging rooms on the upper floors, which contributed to the lively street life in Gastown. The Alhambra Hotel was opulent in its time, contrasted with the numerous cheap wooden hotels built in the area before and after the 1886 fire. As the city grew and building materials became more readily available after the arrival of the railway, it was quickly expanded in a series of additions until it reached its present form.

Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
1690 Matthews Avenue – This stately mansion was built in 1910 for William Lamont Tait, a Scottish-born businessman involved in lumber and real estate after his arrival in BC. This Queen Anne mansion with its grand entrance, round turrets, stained-glass windows, and large brackets uses various materials. The building was converted in 1994 to Canuck Place, BC’s pediatric palliative care provider for children with life-threatening illnesses and the families who love them. The goal of this specialized care is to enhance the comfort and quality of life for both the child and their family. It is achieved through the combination of active and compassionate therapies. Palliative care strives to support children and families by assisting them in fulfilling their physical, psychological, social and spiritual goals while remaining sensitive to personal, cultural and religious values, beliefs and practices.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3637 Hudson Street – Tudor style
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3470 Osler Street – dormers
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3688 Osler Street – dormers, recessed entrance way
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3733 Osler Street – Tudor style, round room
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3690 Selkirk Street – two-story pillars with balcony above, bay window
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3689 Selkirk Street – A.E. Tulk House Rosemary – This 1915 Tudor Revival English Manor was built for lawyer and whiskey baron Edward Tulk who named it after his only daughter Rosemary. From 1947 to 1994, the house was owned by The Order of the Convent of Our Lady of the Cenacle who operated it as a retreat.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
36 West Cordova Street – Lonsdale Building – built 1889
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
207 West Hastings Street at Cambie Street – Dominion Building – When it opened in 1910 it was the tallest building in the British Empire; it was Vancouver’s first steel-framed high-rise at 53 meters (175 feet). It was built to house the Dominion Trust which later became the Dominion Bank.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The famous Gastown clock on Water Street, designed and built by R. L. Saunders, is the world’s first steam power clock. This clock is located at the western boundary of the old Granville townsite, known as Gastown. In 1870, the shore of Burrard Inlet was only a few yards north of this point. Through the early 1900s, Gastown was the commercial center of Vancouver. By the 1960s, it had become the center of Vancouver’s “Skid Road.” In the early 1970s, it was rehabilitated to its former stature. The success of its rehabilitation was the result of cooperation between many parties working together to beautify the streets.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
2 Water Street – 1887 – Peckinpah Restaurant – The Byrnes Block is a two-story, Victorian Italianate commercial brick building, with a later addition to the south located across a narrow passageway. It is situated on Maple Tree Square at the irregular intersection of Alexander, Powell, Water and Carrall Streets in the historic district of Gastown. The Byrnes Block is one of the oldest buildings in Vancouver located on its original site. Features include: trapezoidal floor plan, flat roof, two-story height, elaborate pedimented window hoods and surrounds on the second floor, projecting cornice with alternating large and small eave brackets, and an elaborate arched corner pediment, masonry construction, including painted brick cladding with flush-struck mortar joints on two main facades and common red brick cladding on rear facades, large rectangular storefront windows on the ground floor enabled by the use of cast iron columns; elongated double-hung 1-over-1 wood-sash windows on the second floor of the two main facades.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
1 Water Street – “Gassy Jack” – 1830-1875 – John Deighton was born in Hull, England. He was an adventurer, river boat pilot and captain, but best know for his “Gassy” monologues as a saloon keeper. His Deighton House Hotel, erected here on the first subdivided lot, burned in the great fire of June 13, 1886. Here stood the old maple tree under whose branches the pioneers met in 1885, and chose the name Vancouver for this city.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
401 Main Street – Carnegie Public Library with two-story Ionic columns, dome and cupola

Kamloops British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 8 Picks

Kamloops British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos

Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
118 Nicola Street – William O. Ellis House – W.O. Ellis was a local pharmacist and active community member. He built his home on tree lined Nicola Street in 1929. It has many features typical of the Arts and Crafts style, but it is also looking forward to architectural trends popularized in the 1930s. The cream-colored stucco, green window boxes, and red steps are the original colors.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
223 Nicola Street – The style of this home is typical of the 1910 period in Kamloops and is best described as anti-Victorian in sentiment. It was built in 1909. The overall shape is rectangular and right-angled. Adornment is kept to a minimum. Homes like this can be found scattered throughout Kamloops and were generally owned by small businessmen or railway officials.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
226 Nicola Street – S. B. Brooke House – This English style cottage was built in 1940 by C.N.R. Conductor Bernard Brooke (aka ‘Babbling Brooke’) and his wife Ruby, after their home at 1426 Lorne Street burned to the ground. Mrs. Brooke and her two children escaped into the -20°F weather at midnight with only their overcoats and nightclothes. The fire brigade’s efforts were hampered by the extreme cold and a broken fire hydrant. Mr. Brooke returned home to find that his wife had narrowly escaped the flames, as the front door had jammed, making her exit difficult. In 1942, C.N.R. Engineer, Archibald Legg and his new bride Janet Darlington purchased this home. The couple were former neighbors in the 800 block Battle Street when both became widowed. Sadly, Archibald Legg was killed in 1948, in a train wreck near Lytton, and Janet remained in the house until 1970. The architecture of this stucco house is unique in the Kamloops area. The steep pitched, double peaks at the front of the house are repeated once at the rear. These details were labor intensive, but add greatly to the appeal of the home inside and out. This four-bedroom cottage has only one bathroom; however, an upstairs bedroom features the original built-in vanity sink. Chamber pots were probably a necessity as one of the resident families had seven children.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
255 Nicola Street –Sacred Heart Cathedral – Sacred Heart Cathedral was built in 1921 to replace a wood frame church which had burned. Interesting architectural features include stained and leaded glass windows, red brick with white stone accents, columns, balustrade, a tower, and dome.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
822 Nicola Street – Charles and Clara Hirst built the first house on this block in 1912 in the popular classic box style. The house was subsequently bought by Robert McCall in 1921 who was elected the Police Commissioner in 1926. The house has been extensively restored to its original condition with clapboard siding, v board soffits, wood rafter fascia, and leaded glass panel windows.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
868 Nicola Street – Royal Dayton Bell House – This late Craftsman style house was built just before the outbreak of World War II by R.D. Bell. Bell was a contractor and carpenter, and given the quality of this house, he probably built it himself. The outside of the house is sided in double rows of cedar shingles. The verandah is getting smaller, as was typical of this period, but it is still a comfortable size by today’s standards and features a wide top railing and slender columns with decorative moldings. Pretty window boxes complete the cottage-like quality of the house.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
875 Nicola Street – This Bungalow style house was built in 1944. The exterior has original plaster stucco siding, wood soffits and fascia, multi-pane wood frame windows and a scallop frame to accent the front side.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
115 Tranquille Road – c. 1909-1910 – The Wilson House is a one-and-one-half-story wood-frame house influenced by the Gothic Revival style and connected with William Stewart Wilson, a local farmer, businessman and politician, and the first Chairman of the Village of North Kamloops. The house has a steeply-pitched side gabled roof and side bay window, a central gabled wall dormer, and a full-width open veranda.

Kamloops British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 8 Picks

Kamloops British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos

Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
245 St. Paul Street – Stuart Wood School – 1907 – It is a three-story school, with a full-height basement, with a symmetrical facade in the Neo-Classical style. It is clad in red brick, has a broad hip roof, front and rear gabled projections, and parged string courses. The architecture conveys a sense of permanence and order and demonstrates the Romanesque Revival style in its massive masonry construction and round-arched windows. There are arched transoms above the three central windows on the third floor. The Classical Revival is evident in the pedimented portico, classical columns, and arched fanlight window above the central entrance. The large sash windows were characteristic of contemporary school design, arranged to take advantage of natural light and ventilation. It has been in continuous use as a school for over a century.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
603 St. Paul Street – This Classic Box style house built in 1911 was popular at the beginning of the twentieth century. There are numerous examples throughout the older sections of the city. Typically, it has clapboard siding, v board soffits and wood rafter fascia. Because this house has been used for commercial use many of the original windows and doors have been replaced to meet modern building codes.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
619 St. Paul Street – Herbert and Florence Davies House – This home is a classic example of the Craftsman style house in Kamloops. It was built in 1924 during one of the greatest economic boom times in Kamloops’ history. The first owners were Herbert and Florence Davies. Herbert Davies was a contractor, so it is very likely he built this house himself. As a contractor, Herbert was well-known for his work on the city hall addition in 1913, as well as houses at Seventh Avenue and Dominion.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
715 St. Paul Street – This is one of a dozen identical houses built in this block by an English contractor between 1913 -1923. Craftsman in style this house was built in 1913. It has v board soffits, wood rafter fascia, broad weather board siding and wood frame widows. The verandah has four square pillars that is common to this style and the front door is original.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
673 Battle Street – The ‘Ideal’ house was built in 1912 by Edwin and Alice Walkley. Mr. Walkley was the owner of the Small and Dobson Cement Plant in BC Fruitlands on the North Shore. The plant manufactured concrete building blocks which were used to build many basements in Kamloops. Walkley introduced a molded hollow block to Kamloops called ‘ideal’ blocks which he used to build this house and one at 467 St. Paul Street. The hollow shape was meant to replace the need for insulation. In fact, the house was cool in the summer, but too cold in the winter. Each block was hand-made by Walkley in the backyard using several molds with different patterns on the facing. The blocks were sun-dried before being set into place. The overall style of the house is very similar to the wood frame, two story four-square houses of the same era with attic dormer windows found throughout Kamloops.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
48 Battle Street West – a Roy Burris House – Roy Burris was a member of the famous Kamloops medical family. He had this house built in 1911. It is very similar in style and age to 179 Battle Street West and shares many of the same architectural features. Its long, low verandah is typical of the bungalow style developed by the British in India to keep out the hot, piercing rays of the sun. The verandah boasts the square columns with decorative trim and bay windows typical of the era. The original cedar shingle siding on this house was spared the unfortunate ‘modernizing’ stucco facelift that so many houses in the neighborhood fell victim to in the 1940s and 1950s. Cedar siding is a distinguishing characteristic of early Kamloops houses. The windows still have their original glass panes.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
101 Battle Street West – A. Galloway House – When this house was built in 1928, it was considered ultramodern and very forward looking. The red mansard roof, red brick steps, plate glass windows, dormers, window boxes and small front porch with a “Greek porch” roof are all original features. Archibald Galloway owned a pharmacy in Kamloops for many years. He also successfully ran as a City Councillor and was director of many community organizations.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
133 Battle Street West – Frederick E. Young House – When this house was built in 1910, it was surrounded by sweeping property which stretched south and east for several lots. The owner, Frederick Young, was owner and publisher of the Kamloops Standard newspaper. A tennis court, croquet area, gazebo, and a stable located at 76 Nicola Street West were part of the property. The two-story house has an expansive wraparound verandah accessed by a broad flight of stairs, wide leaded glass windows, two circular windows above the front door, sturdy tapered columns, Craftsman style mill work, exposed rafter ends, and an attic dormer.

Kamloops British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Kamloops British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos

Kamloops is a city in south central British Columbia in Canada, located at the confluence of the two branches of the Thompson River near Kamloops Lake.

The first European explorer, David Stuart, arrived in 1811; he was sent out from Fort Astoria, a Pacific Fur Company post; he spent a winter there with the Secwepemc people. He and Alexander Ross established a post there in May 1812, “Fort Cumcloups”.

The rival North West Company established another post, Fort Shuswap, nearby in the same year. The two operations were merged in 1813 when the North West Company officials in the region bought out the operations of the Pacific Fur Company. After the North West Company’s forced merger with the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1821, the post became known commonly as Thompson’s River Post, or Fort Thompson, which over time became known as Fort Kamloops.

After the fur trade arrived in 1812, Kamloops became the crossroads for horse-drawn pack trains. In the years that followed, Kamloops’ reputation as a bristling locality for trade and commerce was greatly broadened by the gold rush of the 1850s, among other things. Following the arrival of the first permanent ranchers was the railway which came through in 1893; Kamloops continued to be the resting stop for the weary travelers. Kamloops has continued to grow since then with cattle ranching, forestry and mining.

The gold rush of the 1860s and the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which reached Kamloops from the West in 1883, brought further growth.

Pulp, plywood, veneer, cement, and a copper mine are industries in Kamloops. The Royal Inland Hospital is the city’s largest employer. Thompson River University serves a student body of 10,000.

Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
7 Seymour Street West – 1909 – Kamloops Court House – local brick and imported granite and slate three-story building in Edwardian Baroque style – slate roof with rolled copper roof ridge, balustrades, parapeted gables, turret, cupola, oriel window, cornerstone quoins and accents, and heraldic arms
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
405 Victoria Street – Plaza Hotel – a five-story Spanish Colonial Revival style built 1927-1928 – metal pantile canopies, top floor outdoor roof patio with open round arches, round arches also at ground level, stucco exterior walls, large timber brackets, top floor corner balconies with French doors with semi-circular transoms; lobby with oak floors. For the official opening, there was a grand banquet and rooftop dancing. The original hotel had fifty-six hotel rooms. Additional rooms were built onto the hotel in 1948 and 1959. The Plaza Hotel hosted a rooftop tea garden that served the Queen tea on one of her trips to Canada.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
205 Victoria Street – Royal Bank – One of the finest bank buildings erected in Kamloops is this brick structure built in 1911\1912. The remains of an elaborate frieze can still be seen along the top edge of the building. The front facade once featured brick columns, arched windows, and striped awnings. The unpaved street was lined with cluster lights and tall trees.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
118 Victoria Street – The Old Bank of Commerce is a two-story Edwardian Baroque building with Kamloops pressed red brick and dressed stone trim built in 1904. It has a symmetrical front facade, granite foundation with raised tuckpointing, cave modillions, engaged pilasters, block quoins, external brick chimney, dentils, over-scale lunettes placed over windows with giant keystones, and a hipped roof.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
377 Victoria Street/220 4th Avenue – Ellis Block – The Godmans built this brick building in 1914. In 1917, the Galloway-Ellis Pharmacy opened on the ground floor. Partner W.O. Ellis bought the building in 1951. His drugstore remained in operation on this site under various owners until 1994.
Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
Kamloops is a city of bridges. During the 1880s the growing community of Kamloops needed a bridge to connect with its most important partner, the Kamloops Tk’emlúps Indian Band on the north shore and the predominately white population in the city. The wooden truss structure measured 300 meters and included a swing span to accommodate paddle wheelers. The official name for the bridge was Government Bridge but it has always been colloquially known as The Red Bridge. The current bridge is the third Red Bridge and was built in 1936. The 1,200-foot (366 meters) bridge required over 300,000 feet of lumber and two pre-fabricated spans that were placed on four piers. Clearance in the center is 35 feet (11 meters) above high water and 54 feet (16 meters) above low water. The location of the bridge is a natural crossing point on the South Thompson River before it joins the North Thompson River. For thousands of years the Tk’emlúps Indian Band of the Secwépemc Nation lived in the area as hunters and gatherers. They were nomadic during the summer relying on salmon from the river, wild game, and nature’s provisions. In the winter they lived in Keekwillie pit houses along the shores of the South Thompson and Thompson rivers. Archaeological evidence of pit houses, burial sites and artifacts remain abundant to the present and can be viewed at the Secwépemc Museum and Heritage Park. The bridge is centrally located and provides views of Mount Paul, Mount Peter and the conjunction of the South Thompson and North Thompson Rivers.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
297 First Avenue – The Inland Cigar Factory is a two-story red brick Victoria era commercial building with a corbelled cornice, arched second floor window openings and a blind arched opening above central entry with rubbed brick outline and herringbone infill.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
475 Lee Road – This Art Deco house built in 1931 features plaster siding, wood trim, arched windows with multi-pane glass and decorative shutters.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
817 Columbia Street – Owen Norris House – Owen Norris settled in Kamloops in 1906. He was elected alderman in 1910 but he argued and clashed with the mayor. When Norris ran for mayor in 1911, he was soundly defeated. Norris left Kamloops the following year shortly after his new house on Columbia street was built, in 1912. Norris died a few short years later in Vancouver, in 1918. This house could be a pre-fabricated house. Variations in the roof line and an ‘eyebrow’ window in the top peak soften the details of what is a Georgian Revival/Vernacular style house. Exposed rafter ends, details on the columns and the multipaned windows point to both the Queen Anne Revival and Craftsman styles.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
716 Columbia Street – Hargraves House – This house was built by C.H. Shutt in 1912 and became the family home of William and Margaret Hargraves in 1916. Margaret was an early Kamloops pioneer who arrived in 1878 while William came to the city in 1892. He had two previous marriages before he married Margaret Currie, a widow, in 1913. William Hargraves was a very adaptable businessman. Starting with a blacksmith and bicycle repair shop he moved into owning a hardware store, the Isis movie theater and then a Ford dealership. He was also an alderman during the 1907 – 1910 period but found politics too frustrating and preferred business ventures. He was a well-known local humorist who dressed up as John Bull, the iconic representation of England, for parades and sang comic songs at his theater when the film broke. The architectural style of this house is known as a Classic box structure that was popular in Kamloops at the beginning of the twentieth century. Original exterior features include multi-pane windows and clapboard siding.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
228 Columbia Street – A California Mission Revival style house built in 1931 using plans that the original owners brought from California. Exterior features include the flat roof with ornate parapet and windows with rounded arch construction.

Hedley to Hope British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 23 Picks

Hedley to Hope British Columbia in Colour Photos

Hope is located at the confluence of the Fraser and Coquihalla Rivers. Hope is at the eastern end of the Fraser Valley, and is at the southern end of the Fraser Canyon.

The history of European settlement in the town of Hope is linked with the history of the Hudson’s Bay Company and the partnership between the company surveyors and First Nations in establishing a brigade trail through the mountains to Fort Kamloops. When gold was discovered in the Fraser Canyon in 1858, miners from across the continent flocked to British Columbia to seek their fortune in the mountains and creeks. Two years later gold was discovered in the Cariboo and miners migrated further north to seek riches in the area around Barkerville. In order to facilitate the movement of miners and supplies north, and gold south, the government built the Cariboo Wagon Road which allowed merchants and prospectors to travel faster and hopefully more safely.

The Fraser River has been the greatest source of food for the Sto-lo people who formed permanent settlements along the river. Simon Fraser came down the river in 1808. Hudson’s Bay forts such as Hope (built in 1848-49) and Yale gave the Sto-lo access to a wider variety of trade goods, such as steel tools, cooking pots, and guns.

Keremeos is located in the beautiful Similkameen Valley in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Keremeos’ main industries are horticulture, agriculture, ranching, and wine making. Soft fruits such as apples, cherries, and peaches as well as vegetables are grown in the dry warm climate.

Princeton lies just east of the Cascade Mountains. The Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers converge here. The area’s main industry has been mining of copper, gold, coal, and some platinum.

Gold was found on Nickel Plate Mountain in 1898 in Hedley. The ore was rich but it had to be extracted from the host rock by crushing and chemical treatment.

Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Wood Carving – Hope, British Columbia
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Service Dog “Chip” was killed in the line of duty near Hope on September 13, 1996 while protecting his partner and friend Constable Doug Lewis.
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
RCMP Service Dog “Chip”
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
The Fraser River – The past saw fur traders, the gold rush of 1858, and early settlers. The present sees waters teeming with migrating salmon and a highway and railways confined to the gorge carved by the river. The Fraser River, beautiful, bountiful, and powerful flows in the pattern of our future.
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
“Standoff” Wood Carving
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Man inside trunk with bear and fish above
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Eagle, wolf, bear carving
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Rotary International carving – man holding fish, and fish on bench
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Carver Pete Ryan 1996
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
681 Fraser Avenue – Christ Church – 1861 – This white clapboard, Gothic Revival-styled Anglican Church with leaded glass windows first ministered to gold rush prospectors.
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
A Labyrinth consists of a single meandering pathway that leads from the entrance to the center and back out again. In the Christian tradition, it is a place where one can experience a spiritual walk with our creator. It provides a time for private meditation, a time to pray and talk to God.
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Two-story house with balconies on both stories
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Gothic two-story home
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Queen Anne style with turret and wraparound veranda
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Yellow broom
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Early January 9, 1965 a huge landslide occurred and destroyed about three kilometers of the Hope-Princeton Highway. The slide, consisting of more than 46 million cubic meters of earth, rock and snow, crashed down in seconds from the 2,000-meter-high mountain ridge.
Architectural Photos, Princeton, British Columbia
Princeton Town Hall
Photos Hedley, British Columbia
Hedley – From the heart of this mountain, men took $47,000,000 in gold. In 1904 Hedley boomed with the opening of the mill in town and the Nickel Plate Mine on the mountaintop. The nearby Hedley Mascot Mine, on a claim of less than an acre, mined a fortune. In 1955 the gold, silver and copper ore were exhausted.
Photos, Hedley, British Columbia
Hedley Trading Post
Photos, Keremeos, British Columbia
Keremeos – village
Photos, Keremeos, British Columbia
Keremeos – mountain
Photos, Keremeos, British Columbia
Keremeos – mountain
Photos, British Columbia
Driving on the highway from Hedley to Hope, British Columbia

Penticton British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 12 Picks

Penticton British Columbia in Colour Photos

Penticton is a city in the Okanagan Valley of the Southern Interior of British Columbia situated between Okanagan and Skaha Lakes.

In 1866, Tom Ellis, the first European settler in Penticton, built his ranch house. Tom and his wife Wilhemina raised their family, planted Penticton’s first fruit trees and established his 30,000-acre cattle ranch. The Penticton Hotel was established in 1892 by Ellis, who positioned it around the local government area, and its first road: Front Street. The sidewalks on the street were made from wood, with coal oil lamps being introduced to the sidewalk.

Four Shatford brothers moved to the Okanagan from Nova Scotia and were influential in the area. W.T. Shatford bought out the Ellis Estate and formed the South Okanagan Land Company in 1905; he became rich. Lytton became a senator when Robert Borden was Prime Minister and the Senator Shatford School was named after him. Large dams were built on the upper reaches of the Ellis and Turnbull Creeks creating a gravity-fed irrigation system needed to develop the area into the “Garden of Eden.”

Horses were instrumental in opening up the interior by carrying goods over the Brigade Trail. Stagecoaches and wagons followed with railways and boats came into use after that. Herds of wild horses roam freely in the hills.

Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
558 Ellis Street – P.D. McDonald House – 1912 – rusticated concrete block house – cross-gabled with exposed beams, symmetrical, four square porch posts with Ionic detailing, broken pediments, paired double-hung windows, central entry, wide overhanging eaves, Dutch style chimney pots
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
570 Martin Street – 1911 – shingle style with a cross-gable form, flared eaves and a prominent pedimented gable; the full front porch has square shingled porch posts; the windows are double hung; the continuous wall covering is of square cut shingles
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
1201 Fairview Road – Art Moderne style – 1940 – flat roof, rounded corners, groupings of windows, smooth stucco surface, coping at the roof line
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
984 Fairview Road – 1922 – 1½ story saddle-notched log house – The Beatons bought it within five years of construction and lived in it for seventy-five years. Bertie Beaton was a member of a pioneer family who arrived in 1906 and ran the Penticton Hotel; her husband worked for the Kettle Valley Railway. It has a deep front porch, wide steps, low-pitched side-gabled roof, rooftop shed dormer, and the fireplace was constructed with cobbles from Shatford Creek.
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
494 Young Street – 1913 – Keyes House – 1½ story Late Victorian cottage with steeply pitched paired gables and a shingled gable truss – The use of a variety of surface materials including shingle and lap siding is typical of Queen Anne Revival architecture. Robert Grey Keyes was a member of City Council.
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
230 Orchard Avenue – 1938 – The Tupper Residence – Art Moderne – smooth stucco finish, curved corners and horizontal bands, flat roofs, curved concrete steps, wraparound multi-paned windows, recessed entrance
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
158 Eckhardt Avenue East – Penticton High School – 1913 – Neo-Georgian style, three brick bays, raised basement, Romanesque central entrance arch with arched windows above, hipped roof, deeply articulated dentil courses, roof-top cupola
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
696 Main Street – Penticton United Church – 1929 – Gothic Revival stone and stucco – square tower, stained glass windows, arched windows and doorways
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
100 Main Street – Penticton Court House – 1949 – Art Deco-Moderne style
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
196 Penticton Avenue – Sutcliffe Residence – 1912 – Queen Anne Revival style
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
220 Manor Park Avenue – Leir House – 1929 – vernacular architecture, stone cladding, dominant entrance porch and stairs – thirteen bedrooms to accommodate the eleven Leir children
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
The S.S. Sicamous, a steel-hulled stern wheeler, rests on the southern shores of Okanagan Lake in downtown Penticton. It is 200 feet long and was quite luxurious. From 1914 to 1936 she made daily runs between Penticton and Okanagan Landing at the north end of the lake carrying up to 250 passengers plus mail and freight.

Kelowna British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

Kelowna British Columbia in Colour Photos

The Kelowna town site was laid out in 1892, and by 1898 the community growing on the shores of Okanagan Lake began to show that it would become a permanent settlement. As people came so did the traveling missionaries and students of both the Presbyterian and Methodist churches. Kelowna is the largest community in the Okanagan Valley.

The Okanagan Sunflower is the official floral emblem of Kelowna. It is one of the longest blooming wildflowers, providing abundant splashes of bright yellow on the hillsides in early spring. The plant is drought tolerant; it’s completely edible and was used by the First Nations peoples as a food source. Its large yellow flowers reflect the sunny Okanagan skies and the hot summer climate.

The service industry employs the most people in Kelowna. In summer, boating, swimming, water skiing, windsurfing, fishing, golfing, hiking and biking are popular. In winter both Alpine and Nordic skiing are favorite activities at the nearby ski resorts. Kelowna produces wines that have received international recognition. Vineyards are found around and south of the city where the climate is ideal for the many wineries. Kelowna is the home of Sun-Rype, a popular manufacturer of fruit bars and juices.

Many prominent people played a part in Kelowna becoming the city it is today and many of them made their homes on Marshall Street. The W.J. Marshall family was one of the very early families to settle here and their home is at 1869. R.B. Staples owned the Beaverdell Silver Mine and was also prominent in the fruit industry; their home is at 1812.

Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
781 Bernard Avenue – The David Leckie (successful businessman and civic leader) House was built in 1906 in the late Queen Anne style. A tall gable on the right is balanced by a dormer on the left. There is narrow horizontal wood siding and a semi-circular porch with a balustrade above.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
806 Bernard Avenue – Jessie Willard Hughes House – 1933 – Colonial Revival style – J.W. Hughes planted the first commercial vineyards in 1926 and he exported gladioli and peony bulbs.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
830 Bernard Avenue – James W. Jones (Mayor, Conservative MLA) – 1912 – Queen Anne style, hipped roof with dormer, classic foursquare, wraparound pillared veranda, narrow horizontal wood siding
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
865 Bernard Avenue – James Bacon Knowles (jeweler and watch maker) house built in 1907 – hipped roof, wood frame construction with double-beveled wooden siding, wooden trim and details.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
870 Bernard Avenue – William Hughes-Games house – 1936 – is a Vernacular Cottage with a cross-gabled roof. There is an arched opening to a recessed entry.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
757 Lawrence Avenue – George Arthur Meikel House – 1910 – Dutch Colonial style – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
831 Lawrence Avenue – Howard E. Atchison House – 1931 – Tudor Revival style with half-timber detailing on stucco, gable roof truncated at the peak
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
857 Lawrence Avenue – Dougald McDougall (civil engineer in fruit industry) House – 1922 – California Craftsman Bungalow – gable roof with deep eaves and exposed rafters, deep porch
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
868 Lawrence Avenue – William Harold Hunter McDougall (fruit grower and exporter) House – 1909 – Vernacular Cottage style
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
966 Lawrence Avenue – Munson House – 1911 – Victorian Foursquare with hipped roof, gabled dormer and covered porch – Robert Munson was a sawmill worker.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
987 Lawrence Avenue – Renwick House – 1912 – Queen Anne style – altered from the original – turret, bay window, dormers
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
1001 Lawrence Avenue – Second Knowles House – 1913 – J. B. Knowles was a jeweler and civic leader. Dutch Colonial Revival style – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
228 Lake Avenue – This house was the home of Harold Pettman and his family. Harold and his brother Charles ran Pettman Brothers Grocery until 1966 when Harold became Manager of the Okanagan Federated Shippers. This 1½ story wood frame house was built in 1941 during the wartime. It is in Cape Code style. It has a cross-gabled roof, and a concrete foundation. There is horizontal siding on the first story and vertical siding with polygonal ends on the upper half-story. A small gabled roof supported with brackets covers the front entrance.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
1922 Abbott Street – John Francis Fumerton and Annie Maria brought their family to Kelowna in 1916 where he established a men’s clothing, dry goods and shoe store. This 1½ story wood frame house was built in 1933 on the corner of Abbott and Vimy. With its picturesque roof line and casement windows, this Storybook cottage is a romantic representation of traditional domestic ideals. It has a steeply-pitched cross-gabled roof with gabled projections, its original glazed front door and semi-circular concrete front entrance steps.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
1858 Abbott Street – 1937 – Moderne style – streamlined, flat parapet roof, stucco and horizontal banding and cladding, multi-sash windows with narrow trim, curved walls, asymmetrical facade, canopy over entrance