Blog on Chemainus British Columbia – My Top 30 Picks

Chemainus British Columbia

Chemainus is located south of Nanaimo, and one hour north of Victoria on Trans-Canada Highway.

The name Chemainus comes from the native shaman and prophet Tsa-meeun-is (Broken Chest). Legend says that the man survived a massive wound in his chest to become a powerful chief.

Founded as a logging town in 1858, Chemainus has been tied to the forestry industry throughout its history. In the 1980s, realizing the slumping lumber industry could be devastating to the beautiful seaside community, a program was initiated to attract tourists to Chemainus. Artists began to paint murals depicting the town’s rich history on the walls of businesses and other buildings. Chemainus is now the world’s largest outdoor art gallery. Colorful murals fill every available wall in town while documenting local history in fascinating detail.

The Chemainus Murals have inspired communities throughout the world to explore their roots, to beautify their towns, and instill pride.  Using the Chemainus model, some communities have used the mural concept to develop their own revitalization for stronger economic development.

Heritage Square is a meeting place for all people.

Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
In 1862, the first Chemainus Saw Mill was powered by a fifty-foot waterfall. This energy turned a wooden wheel forty-five feet in diameter to which was attached a series of smaller wheels, chains and gears. The combination drove a vertical saw used to produce spars and cants for export.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Three Generations Sculpture by Sandy Clark on Legion Street. – Al and Marg Johnson of Chemainus commissioned the creation of these fiberglass figures. The backdrop was painted at a later date. Al and Marg’s daughters donated the sculptures and backdrop to the Chemainus Festival of Murals Society after the deaths of their parents. It is a reminder that much dedication, community spirit, hard work and love made Chemainus “The Little Town That Did”.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
The Company Store is a 10 x 8-meter mural on Waterwheel Crescent. It was painted by Dan Sawatzky in 1983. Using an oval format, this mural shows an interior depiction of the Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Co. Ltd. store, circa 1917. The artist recreated the deep perspective of the colorfully-laden shelves from old photographs. D.A. Gatus was the store manager. He is seen standing in the mid-ground. Ann Porter worked as a clerk, and is pictured on the left behind the counter. The V L & M Co. Ltd. used one of the first known credit card systems in the store. The purchaser would pay for the goods with coupons. In turn, the store would receive credit for the same from the company, which would deduct the amount from their employee’s pay check. The name “Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Co. Ltd.”, and its trademark, the letter “V” in a diamond, became known throughout the world.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Chemainus 1891 is a 16.4 x 3.5-meter mural on Mill Street painted by artist Isaac MacIagan in 1983. Passenger cars of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway (E&N) steam their way across this scene of the settlement at Horseshoe Bay in 1891. The predominant center road is present-day Mill Street.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Maple Lane Café
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Patriotic feelings ran high as many men from Chemainus and area joined up soon after war was declared. By the end of September 1914, the mill had closed due to the war’s impact on shipping. The connection to the land the young soldiers had labored so hard to tame was severed. They left behind the fields and forest, the homesteads and the growing village, the families and elders, who would have to carry on. By the end of 1915, more than 15 percent of the local population had gone off to this bitter war; many would not return.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
House with turret
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
A huge, foreshortened iron horse steams and belches dark smoke as it leaps out of its frame and almost off the wall of Dan Sawatzky’s former home and studio on Alder Street. The subject is a working engine operating in the Chemainus area early in the 20th century. Engineer Sam Alexander operated the No. 3 Climax Engine as it hauled logs along the rails of the Chemainus Valley. The E&N Railway was completed in 1886, although working trains had been a familiar sight in the community for several years. The larger engines plied the rails through the hills and the valleys of the E&N land belt, from which the Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Co. Ltd. drew a great deal of its timber. Smaller, more compact engines worked nearer to and at the mill, shunting timber and finished products to where they were needed.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Chemainus
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
New Image Fitness Studio
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Logging with Oxen is an 18.4 x 3.7-meter mural at Waterwheel Park. It was painted by Harold Lyon in 1983. Around 1898, oxen were the main form of power in logging where good timber was available. Large, well-equipped outfits used twenty to twenty-four oxen. These were divided into two teams: one drawing the logs from the bush to the road, while the other and stronger team was employed in skidding the logs to the water. Since the ox’s hoof has a thin shell, the oxen were carefully shod with thin, half-moon shaped iron shoes.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Mural on Chemainus Harbour
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Chemainus Harbour
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
The Spirit of Chemainus was painted by artist Dan Sawatsky in 1991 on the wall of the Pacific Shores Inn Hotel which is a quaint European-style Inn with the privacy and comforts of an American All-Suite Hotel.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
9875 Maple Street – Wreckless Potworxx Bistro and Grill
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
9877 Maple Street – Shear Impressions Nail and Hair Salon
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
9885 Maple Street – Twisted Sisters Tea Room
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Chemainus Outdoor Gathering was painted in 2010-2013 by Lurene Haines on Willow Street. The mural is a two-part story of a typical outdoor Chemainus community gathering, with Mount Brenton in the background, set in the late 1800s. It depicts women, men and children in clothing appropriate for the time. The mural covers two sides of the Chemainus Seniors Drop-In Centre. The first segment is on part of the south wall, facing the centre’s parking lot and downtown Chemainus. The second segment and the largest piece, on the north wall facing the lane, contains the main body of the mural. The mural is designed with the first segment featuring people traveling north toward the large, second segment wall. The orientation of the first segment figures is designed to draw the onlooker’s attention and interest toward the main body of the mural.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Chemainus Outdoor Gathering Mural
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Painted by D. G. Chamberlain in 1988
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
The Older Generations – By Barrie Shaw-Rimmington – on Willow Street – Neil Newton and Dianne Hopkins of Chemainus commissioned this sculpture around 1990. It was created from a series of walk around photos of Neil’s parents, Yvonne and Tom Newton. It is made of Resin mixed with bronze particles then colored with acrylic paint.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
The Hermit was painted in 2004 by Paul Ygartua on Willow Street. After a life of living rough, Charlie Abbott wandered into Chemainus and settled into a wooded area nearby. Living alone in the forest he loved, he began transforming it. He planted flower beds, walled pathways, trails, and secluded corners. Charlie’s solitary sanctuary, the Hermit Trail, was a masterpiece of garden and wilderness which he shared with visitors until his death in 1989, at the age of 87.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Chemainus Home
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
The Thirty-Three Metre Collage was painted in 1982 by artists Frank Lewis and Nancy Lagana and is on Legion Street. At the center, a boom man sorts logs in the slippery danger of the log dump. The mill is portrayed here as it was in 1892; it was the third operation to be built on the site. Owned by the Victoria Lumber & Manufacturing Co. Ltd., it was improved over the years until a fire destroyed it in 1923.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Arrival of the H.M.S. Reindeer in Horseshoe Bay (now called Chemainus Bay) in 1869 was painted by artists Sandy Clark and Lea Goward in 1983. A luminescent cedar bark cloak envelops the figure of a Native princess as she watches the arrival of the sloop Her Majesty’s Ship Reindeer. The ship’s commander, Captain A.E. Kennedy, was an acquaintance of Isabel and Thomas George Askew, pioneers of Chemainus and mill owners for many years. The Reindeer made regular stops in Horseshoe Bay on its rounds of the coast.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
In Search of Snipes is a sculpture by artist Glen Spicer and was cast in 1986. On a moonlit summer’s night in 1913, two strangers found their way into Chemainus. While socializing with the locals, they were told of elusive snipes hiding in the forest, and that this would be a perfect night to catch them. The strangers were shown the secret place in the woods and instructed to hold a lit lantern in front of an open sack, into which the locals, acting as beaters, would drive the snipe. The townsfolk then stole back to the village. After hours of waiting, the boys realized they had been innocent victims of a bit of mischief, and they too returned to the village to join the others and share a good laugh. Snipes, like dreams, can be captured. Through hard work, Chemainus embraced its “snipes” when yesterday’s dreams became today’s realities. Due to irreparable damage, the stranger holding the lantern has been removed and placed in storage.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
The mural of Billy Thomas was painted on the General Store by Sandy Clark in 1984. Billy Thomas was born in 1874 and was the first male child of European ancestry born in the Chemainus Valley. Thomas lived here for all of his 102 years.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
Skating on Fuller Lake is a mural painted in 2007 by Dan Sawatsky on the lane beside the Chemainus Theatre. The climate of Vancouver Island has changed over time. Winters brought snow and on occasion Fuller Lake froze over. Children and adults strapped on their skates and spent a few enjoyable hours at the lake. Impromptu hockey games were great fun.
Photos Chemainus, British Columbia
9737 Chemainus Road – Chemainus Theatre – completed in 1993
Puzzle of Orcas
The mural of Orcas reminds me of the puzzle I just completed, Orca Journey by Wyland, a well-known marine-life artist.

Beaux Arts Architecture in Ontario – Top 17 Picks

Beaux Arts Architecture in Ontario

Beaux Arts: Promoters of this style sought to express the classical principles on a grand and imposing scale. Many of the Beaux Arts buildings were banks, post offices, and railway stations. The Ontario Beaux Arts style is eclectic mixing elements of Classical, Renaissance and Baroque. Often the designs have a temple-like facade, porticoes with pediments, balustrades, and capitals in many styles.

This neoclassical style is named for the French School of Architecture – l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts – that had a great impact on architecture during the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century. Beaux-Arts architecture employs balance and symmetry and a hierarchy of spaces – from “noble spaces,” such as grand entrances and staircases, to utilitarian ones of increasing privacy. Beaux-Arts buildings are often grand and ornate, but always exhibit clarity of form and are decorated with classical elements such as columns. In Ontario, the Beaux-Arts style was most prominently used for civic buildings.

Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 4 – 366 North Front Street at Campbell Street – Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce – Beaux Arts style – engaged columns with Doric capitals, voussoirs and keystones

Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt Book 2 – 34 Water Street – Galt Public Library – 1903 – Beaux Arts style with pillars topped with capitals, triangular pediment with three acroterions, and the tympanum decorated with a Renaissance wreath surrounding an open library book; dentil molding. The cornice over the door has a central acroterion as well as two acroterions on the corners.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cayuga – 1 Cayuga Street North
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – 55 Main Street West – Hamilton Public Library was constructed in 1913 in the Beaux Arts style with pillars, dentil molding under cornice. It served as the main library for 67 years. Refurbished in 1989 to house the Unified Family Court.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kitchener Book 2 – Wilfrid Laurier University building – Beaux Arts style
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
New Hamburg Book 1 – 145 Huron Street – New Hamburg Public Library – Beaux Arts/Classical Revival style
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – The decorative stonework on the Broadway and Mill Street facades is a hallmark of the Beaux-Arts Classicism style with the use of columns
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 77 Gore Street East (corner of Basin Street) – The McMillan Building – 1907 – former Carnegie Library – Beaux Arts style – pediments, pilasters with composite capitals, elaborate keystones
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 212-214 West Street – Constructed in 1911, the Imperial Bank of Commerce has a terracotta exterior and is in the Beaux Arts style. There is a dominant cornice and arched windows.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 175 Dorset Street West – David Smart House (The Hillcrest) – c. 1870 – This house is the only example of “Beaux Arts” architecture in Port Hope. An addition to the house was made around 1900 which consists of the large Jeffersonian portico on the north. This massive two and a half-story structure is held by fluted columns with large Corinthian capitals, the main original portion of the house is hipped roof section with two polygonal wings at each end. This section sports beautiful Palladian dormers, bracketed eaves and a grand verandah. The house was built for David Smart, a barrister and notary public who married Emily A. Worts of Gooderham and Worts Distilleries of Toronto. Smart became a director of that distillery.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 420 Queen Street East – Ministry of the Attorney General Court House was completed in 1922 in the Beaux Arts Classical style. It shows fine workmanship, good material and attention to details. The imposing, symmetrical, three-story structure is built of orange-brown stone and brick. It is set back from the street on an elevated site and approached by a circular driveway. Its temple front facade consists of Ionic columns supporting a brick pediment.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smiths Falls – 81 Beckwith Street North – Smiths Falls Public Library – 1903 – Beaux Arts style, Ionic pillars supporting pediment with decorated tympanum and decorative cornice; corner quoins
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 1 – 15 Church Street North – 1905 – Beaux Arts style, Public Library built of St. Marys limestone – pediment with dentil molding, pillars with Corinthian capitals
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay Book 4 (Fort William) – 440 South Syndicate Avenue – Built in 1911 as a union station by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR), the station served as a passenger terminal and as administrative headquarters for the vast grain-handling facilities that were the foundation of the community. Union Station is a good example of Beaux-Arts design applied to a railway station. Notable architectural features include a projecting central bay with stone quoins and two wheat sheaves carved in Bedford stone, an arched entrance with a transom light, and projecting end bays with pilasters topped with decorative elements.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – 88 Bidwell Street – St. Paul’s United Church
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 2 – 227 King Street South – The head office of The Mutual Life Assurance Company of Canada (now head office of Sun Life Financials’ Canadian operations) was completed in 1912. The Renaissance Revival style building is ornamented with features such as the two-story fluted paired Ionic columns supporting a large segmental arch above the main doors, elaborate window surrounds, and a parapet with a balustrade. It is clad in light brown and yellow Roman brick, and embellished with projecting pedimented bays and quoins. Many of the decorative details on the facade are made from imported English terracotta. Situated within a Beaux Arts designed landscape, the building is a unique and iconic corporate pavilion. The monumental scale of the building and its rich ornamentation symbolize the importance and stability of Waterloo’s first life insurance company and reflect the town’s early twentieth century prosperity and sense of civic pride.
Beaux Arts Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 445 Hunter Street – Public Library – built in 1909 – Beaux-Arts Classicism style – brick, stucco on details such as quoins, columns, portico, Corinthian order columns with flutes, formed metal cornice, flat roof, Carnegie library

Tudor Architecture in Ontario – Top 47 Picks

Tudor Architecture in Ontario

The Tudor Revival is a twentieth century movement in architecture based on sixteenth century English tastes, adapted to modern comforts. Tudor Revival structures tend to have steeply pitched roofs, often with heavy shingles. Some attempt to create the appearance of a thatched roof. Chimneys are common to find on Tudor Revival houses and are often decorated with stonework to make them stand out. If the roof contains odd angles, shapes, or asymmetrical placements of gables, eaves, and other features, the house is built on an asymmetrical floor plan. Tudor-era cottages were built upon over time, with each generation adding or taking away from the family home. As a result, the floor plans were often uneven. Tudor Revival homes are generally designed and built all at once, but the asymmetrical layout helps capture the feel of a family cottage that has been amended over time. Many buildings are composed of patterned brick or stone on the lower floor, but nearly all Tudor Revival structures will at some point transition to half-timbering. Half-timbering was a Tudor-era construction method in which a timber frame for the house would be constructed, but then the spaces between timbers were filled in with plaster or brick instead of more wood. The result was that the timber frame was left exposed, visible, and became part of the decorative elements of the building.

Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Historic Pickering Village within the Town of Ajax – 109 Old Kingston Road – Tudor
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burlington – 566 Locust Street – Tudor style, verge board trim
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt Book 1 – 4 Brant Road South – Tudor-like style with exposed beams but with red brick exterior; 2nd floor balcony above verandah
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 3 – 174 Green Street – 1840 – Haskell House was built in the Tudor Gothic style – It was a theological college to train Anglican priests. For many years it was a public school known locally as the Corktown School. In 1906, Mrs. Haskell of Chicago bought it as a summer home and added a second story and a back wing.
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cornwall – 101 Second Street West – Tudor half-timbering in gable; two-story bay window; pediment; turned wooden porch supports with open railing
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 67 South Street – Tudor style trim
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dunnville Book 1 – 241 Broad Street West – The Lalor Estate is a two-and-a-half-story residence with a four-gable roof and a wraparound veranda with fluted columns. This Edwardian structure was built in 1905. Its builder was Francis Ramsey Lalor, a prominent Dunnville businessman, politician, philanthropist, and entrepreneur. His business interests included two dry goods stores, a grocery store, an apple evaporator, natural gas wells, the F.R. Lalor Canning Factories, the F.R. Lalor Ashes Company, and the Monarch Knitting Mills. The exterior walls are red brick. There is a two-story bay window, Tudor-style timbering in the gable, a pediment above the entrance with a decorative tympanum, and sidelights beside the front door.
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elmira Book 1 – 20 South Street – Tudor style, pediment above porch
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fergus – St. David Street – W. G. Beatty, Foundry – c. 1912 – Tudor style
Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ridgeway – 1061 Ridge Road North
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – 26 Stuart Street – Ker Cavan Coach House built 1928-29 in the Tudor Revival style as part of the expansion of Ker Cavan
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 316 Oxford Street – Many of the features of a Tudor style house have been incorporated in this home, including the patterned brick work, interesting chimney treatment, groups of rectangular windows, and complex roof line with many gables. Straight clean lines and design are typical. The home was built in 1937 and given to Harold and Lorna Wilson by his father E.A. Wilson as a wedding present. The Wilson family owned the Ingersoll Machine & Tool Company and were also involved in speed boat racing. In 1939 Harold won the President’s Cup with his craft “Miss Canada”, making the first time in U.S. boat racing history that the cup was won by a foreigner. Harold is included in the Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 6 – King Street West – Tudor style, dormers
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kitchener Book 2 – 222 Pandora Crescent – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dryden – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
London – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 6135 Culp Street – This was the home of H. R. Acres, the Chief Hydraulic Engineer for the Sir Adam Beck Generating Station No. 1. The Tudor Revival style is shown with its exposed wood beams. The central bay projects forward and is surmounted by a central pediment in the roof. The front entrance is protected by a roof supported by brackets. The front entrance has a double door with sidelights.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara-on-the-Lake Book 1 – 184 Queen Street – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oshawa Book 3 – 55 Connaught Street – J.H. Beaton House – c. 1928 – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 3 – 17 Blackburn Avenue – Embassy of Bosnia and Herzegovina – Tudor style – half-timbering, dormers
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 555 Mackenzie Avenue – The Connaught Building – 1913 – Tudor Gothic – named after the Duke of Connaught, third son of Queen Victoria, who served as 10th Governor General of Canada from 1911–16 – faced in rusticated sandstone, embellished with turrets, a crenellated roof line, buttresses, corbelling, niches, carved embellishments, an ogee arched entrance and rows of flat-headed windows accented by dressed quoins
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 3 – 197 Wurtemburg Street – 1869 – Embassy of the Republic of Turkey – Tudor style – The central portion of the building was a picturesque Gothic Revival structure constructed for W.F. Whitcher, Commissioner of Fisheries. The two wings and the Tudoresque half-timbering were added when the structure served as a Children’s Hospital from 1888-1904.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Owen Sound Book 2 – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 1 – 42 Broadway Street West – Tudor style stucco house
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 72 Charlotte Street – St. James’ Guild Hall – Tudor style, turret
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 3 – 44 Pine Street North – c. 1816 – The two-story brick house in the Tudor Manor style has a steeply pitched gable roof, two chimneys, decorative buttresses, stepped gables with thickly molded windows, and enclosed front porch. on the ground floor there are double casement sash windows with Gothic tracery and a quatrefoil pattern in the top two panes. On the frontispiece above the brick porch is a Gothic arched double casement sash window. The brick porch is reinforced at the corners by attached pillars.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 3 – 144 Maria Street – Tudor style – Elizabethan Manor
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 1129 Queen Street East – A-frame dwelling with Tudor half-timbering on the gable
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 3 – 344 Merritt Street – The former Merritton Public Library was built in 1924 through a grant for the Andrew Carnegie Foundation. The building was designed in the Neo-Tudor style by renowned local architect Arthur Nicholson. The front entrance has a large Tudor-arch with decorative buttresses. A decorated parapet surrounds the flat roof and there is a single chimney. The exterior of the building is a dark discolored rough brick. There is a light-colored stone frieze around the building located below the diamond shaped stone decorations in the brickwork. The many windows allow a lot of natural light into the building. The windows are surrounded by wooden mullions.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 – 113 Lake Street – The former Grantham Fire Hall was constructed of steel and masonry in the Neo-Tudor style. The traditional red brick facade is laid in Flemish bond pattern; there is an elaborate decorative painted wood cornice and frieze. Decorative, rare circle muntin bars are in second floor windows. A stone carving set in entablature over the main door shows a fire carriage being pulled by horses, and stone plaques set in masonry show the firefighting crest. The building was built to accommodate a horse drawn hose wagon.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 1 – 218 Jones Street East – Tudor Revival – 1914 – Jacobean gables, dormer, gambrel roof
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stoney Creek – 91 Lake Avenue – Tudor, corner quoins
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thamesford – 127 Delatre Street West – Tudor half-timbering
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay Book 1 (Port Arthur) – 35 High Street – Tudor half-timbering on steep gables, shed dormer in attic
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay Book 3 (Fort William) – 400 Catherine Street South – This house was built in 1911 for William Ross and his family. Ross worked as an engineer on the Canadian Pacific Railway and as the treasurer of Northern Engineering. Starting in 1947 the house was used by the Lakehead Board of Education. In 1966 it was sold and was divided into apartments and remains as such today. This two and a half story Tudor Revival home was constructed of red sandstone. Architectural features include the massive three story portico on the facade, and the truncated hipped roof. The north and south slopes of the roof each have a chimney.
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – #16 – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Pelham (Fonthill) – Pelham Street – Tudor
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 47 Elgin Street – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 33 Erb Street West – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 47 Albert Street – a Tudor Revival (Arts and Crafts) style house built in 1924 by the manager of the Globe Furniture Company, a world leader in furniture manufacturing especially church and school furnishings and religious carvings
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Welland Book 1 – 41 Frazer Street – Rose-Rohaly House – three-story residence built c. 1906 – converted in 1920s to Tudor Revival style characterized by exposed timbers with stucco infill and multi-paned windows
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Welland Book 2 – 194 Merritt Street West – Tudor style
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 1 – 811 Devonshire Road – Foxley – The Ambery-Isaacs House – 1906-1907 Tudoresque/Arts and Crafts – half-timbered upper story and gable, and the entrance portico blend Medieval and early 20th Century in a harmonious manner
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 1 – 1899 Niagara Street – Willistead Manor – The exterior of gray limestone, quarried in Amherstburg, was hand-cut at the Willistead work site by Scottish stonemasons specifically imported for the project. Tudoresque half-timbering
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 1 – 2088 Willistead Crescent – Tudor style – Dr. Charles W. Hoare Residence – 1920
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 140 Vansittart Avenue – Tudor Revival style – 1½ story, stucco/timber in gables, salt box roof and gable roof at rear with gable wall dormer, multi-lights in grouped casement windows, off-centered door
Tudor Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 4 – 93 Light Street – c. 1849 – Modern Tudor architectural style – two-story, rug brick, trunked roof, shed dormer, off-centered door

Regency Cottage Architecture in Ontario – Top 37 Picks

Regency Cottage Architecture in Ontario

Regency Cottage, 1830-1860 – This style originated in England in 1815 and spread to Ontario later in the 19th century as British officers retired to Canada. It is a modest one-story house with a low-pitched hip roof and has a symmetrical front facade.

Regency Style, 1811-1820: Numerous towns and cities enjoy elegant rows of terraced houses built in what is now called the Regency Style. Windows are tall and thin, with very small glazing bars separating the panes of glass. Balconies are of extremely fine ironwork, made of such delicate curves as to seem almost too frail to support the structure. Proportions are kept simple, relying on clean, classical lines for effect rather than decorative touches. Windows and doors, particularly those on the ground floors, are often round-headed. Curved bow windows are popular, and detached villas often featured garden windows extending right down to the ground.

Ontario Cottage – one or one-and-a-half story buildings with a cottage or hip roof. The cottage roof is an equal hip roof where each hip extends to a point in the center of the roof. The hip roof has a long hip in the center. The Ontario Cottage is the vernacular design of the Regency Cottage which generally has a more ornate doorway and a partial or full verandah surrounding it. The roof can have a dormer, a belvedere, and generally two chimneys.

Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
New Hamburg Book 1 – 244 Peel Street – Gothic Regency Cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Preston – King Street – Ontario Cottage – cement window hoods
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cayuga – 2 Talbot Street – Regency Cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 1 – 212 King Street West – This Ontario cottage was the birthplace of Oscar-winning Hollywood actress Marie Dressler. Completely restored, it now serves as Cobourg Tourist Office. Memorabilia from Marie Dressler’s career and video clips from her movies are on display. Built in 1833, the cottage was of simple design, with two rooms off each side of a central hallway. It had embellishments suited to a family of means, such as high ceilings, large windows, impressive moldings and an elaborate front door. Dressler was a youngster who had a dream of being on the stage; she dared to follow that dream, and persisted in the development of her craft, through times of success and failure. At an age when most stars are long forgotten by Hollywood producers, Dressler reached the pinnacle of her career.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Colborne – 7 King Street West – c. 1830 – In 1846, Cuthbert Cumming and his wife Jane McMurray, acquired a portion of this two-acre property, and the balance in 1852. Cumming was born in Scotland and after working in the Canadian west and Quebec, he retired as a Chief Trader for the Hudson Bay Company. He remained in Colborne for many years, listed in the census records as “a gentleman” until his demise in 1870. The front elevation of this classic Regency Cottage with its low profile and deep roof overhang hides a secret. There are actually five levels, including a stone basement that housed the kitchen and servants in the mid-19th century.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Inglewood – 53 McKenzie Street – Mill Worker’ Cottage – mid 1880s – This 1½ story frame Ontario Cottage is built with a center entry, steep center gable and Gothic window in a style known locally as Rural Gothic or Carpenter’s Gothic. In 1905, Jacob Sithes purchased the house from mill owner David Graham.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford Book 1 – 110 King Street – Dr. Hervey Ross House – 1851 – It is usually called “The Miller House” and is a rare example of a Regency winged temple building. It is called a “winged plan” because it has a one and a half story central body with flanking one-story wings. Decorative features are fancy verge board along the front gable and French casement style windows.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford Book 1 – 133 King Street – Regency Cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford Book 1 – 140 King Street – Regency Cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Terra Cotta – 206 King Street – Blacksmith’s House – late 1870s – This 1½ story frame Ontario Cottage was likely built by William Wright and features a center gable Gothic window, center entry and full front veranda. In 1881, it was sold to the first of several blacksmiths starting with James Carroll, then Robert Gibson in 1900, followed by William G. Marshall in 1908. Gibson and Marshall likely used this house for worker accommodation or for rental.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 5 – 18 Spencer Street East – Known as ‘The Poplars’. The Spencers, Beatty’s and Daintry’s who lived here were closely associated with the history and development of Cobourg and were connected to well-known Canadian families including the Ryersons. Early Ontario Regency Architecture
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 1 – 262 King Street West – old stone Regency Cottage – 1830 – dormer in attic
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dunnville Book 2 – Sweet’s Corners – 5667 Rainham Road – Gothic Ontario Cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elmira – 4 South Street – one story Ontario Cottage with dormer in hipped roof
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Bolton – 52 Sterne Street – circa 1870s – This 1½ story Regency Cottage has the characteristic center entry flanked by symmetric windows and arched window in the center gable. The exterior is clad in wood. The shutters appear to be original and are functional rather than merely decorative. There is clear etched glass in the transom light over the door.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Bolton – 37 King Street East – William Norris House – late 1850s – This frame Regency Cottage with picket fence was purchased by William Norris in 1864. He built a store addition to the east side with a separate door and window to the street. Originally clad in roughcast plaster, it was later veneered in red brick with yellow brick trim, and decorated with ornate door stoop, carved posts and cast-iron railing, all of which have been painted over or replaced. It was bought in 1910 by Alderman D.B Kennedy, Bolton Hydro and school board member who eliminated the separate store by converting its door to a window. John and Vera Elliott Goulter bought the house in 1953 and lived here for 60 years.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grimsby Book 1 – 129 Main Street West – Canterbury Cottage – This historic home was built in 1852 by Charles Nelles, son of Robert, and was deeded to his widowed half-sister Catharine Bingle Porter. Catharine was the daughter of Robert Nelles’ second wife, Maria Bingle. This Regency cottage with its low hip roof and large windows has a cozy appearance that hides its spacious, elegant interior. Two additions have been made to the rear of this home. The bent Catalpa tree in front of the house was once said to be a marker on an early Indian trail, leading south to flint beds in Wainfleet.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – #29 – limestone cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 185 Oxford Street – This one-story Ontario Cottage with a hipped roof is over one hundred years old. Its most attractive features are the front porch with the decorative fascia board, molded brackets and interesting railing construction and the two stained-glass panels in the front windows. This house was built for his sister by F. Richardson, lumber dealer and owner of a planing mill. He became involved in the lumber business around 1885 and erected or supplied lumber for many buildings in the area.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Mount Pleasant – 676 Mount Pleasant Road – This circa 1830 Regency Gothic cottage was the manse of the first Presbyterian and resident minister in the village, Reverend John Bryning – board and batten construction.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Mount Pleasant – 641 Mount Pleasant Road – This farmhouse was built in 1860 in distinctive Regency style evident in the long front windows in fitted panels. The bay window has Victorian details. Both the Phelps and McAllister families have a multi-generation history in the village reaching back to the early 1800s.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Neustadt Book – The Right Honourable John Diefenbaker, son of a local school teacher, was born in this house on September 18, 1895. A distinguished Parliamentarian, he was first elected to the House of Commons in 1940 and served as 13th Prime Minister of Canada, 1957-1963. Gothic Regency Cottage, verge board on gable.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 6103 Culp Street – c. 1798 – This was James Forsyth’s second home in Drummondville. Forsyth was one of the first ten families to settle in this area in 1783. For many years Isaac Culp owned the house and farmed the surrounding land. It is in the Regency Cottage style in a square plan with a low hip roof and symmetrical arrangement of openings across the front facade.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Otterville – 225422 Main Street West – Oddy House – constructed in 1861 – Also called Woodlawn Place which is associated with Thomas Wright, a local, prominent inventor who designed and lived in the building in the mid-nineteenth century. Wright was influenced by Dr. Orson Fowler, whose 1853 book, “The Octagonal House –A Home For All”, encouraged the practicality of octagonal dwellings. Fowler argues that these homes were easier to heat and made greater use of the sun’s rays. It is a fine example of the Regency Cottage style of architecture although its octagonal shape makes it unusual. The building is of plank construction with board and batten siding. The overall plan consists of a 45-foot octagon with a 20 foot by 20-foot wing that is situated to form a trapezoidal umbrage at the side of the house. Typical of the Regency style, Woodlawn Place features a wide roof overhang and deep fascia boards. The front door is flanked with sidelights and Doric pilasters, complimented by a simulated entablature above.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 3 – 899 Keg Lane Road – This 1½ story Regency Style house with four cobblestone walls was built for Charles and Margaret O’Neail, circa 1861, by his father Daniel O’Neail who came to Canada from Ireland in 1830. Daniel was the first president of the Paris Agricultural Society; Charles later served as president.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 2 – 1271 Sherk Road – The property was passed on to David Sherk, son of Casper Sherk, in April 1806. The Sherks came from Pennsylvania and were among the first families to settle in Humberstone. During the mid-1870s, an Ontario farmhouse was built near the center of the lot. The house is an excellent example of nineteenth century farm house building styles and techniques. It displays features of Regency, Gothic and Italianate styles of architecture. Regency detailing is seen in the large first floor windows and wraparound porch. Gothic styling is in the deep eaves and scroll work on the porch posts, and the vertical and horizontal clapboard siding. The Vernacular Ontario Gothic Cottage addition has large multi-pane, sash-type windows with Italianate hooded surrounds, end chimneys and a field stone foundation.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 3 – 17 Victoria Street South – Samuel Coombe Cottage – c. 1860 – This is a one story high hip-roofed Ontario cottage, roughly square in plan with an ell to the rear. Constructed in stretcher-bond brick, it stands on a level site on a corner lot. The facade is symmetrically arranged around a central front door flanked by sidelights and transom. The gable is decorated with barge board and accented by a round-headed window and topped by a spike finial and ornament. Of special interest is the front door vestibule that could be seasonally removed in the warmer months. Samuel Coombe (1826-1905) was born in Stowford County, Devon England emigrating to Port Hope during the prosperous early 1850’s. He made a contribution as a carpenter during the building boom, and into the following decades.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Portland Book – Newboro – 14 Main Street – The Richard Blake House – c. 1858 – Ontario Cottage – 1½ stories; gable window over front doorway provided light to a central hallway on the upper floor; intricate treillage work on the veranda posts, open railing
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – Main Street – Gothic Ontario Cottage, verge board trim on gable, sidelight, transom window, arched voussoirs
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 1 – 316 Brock Street North – 1860 – Regency Cottage, hipped roof
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay – Fort William Book 2 – 200 May Street South – Blake Funeral Chapel – built in 1935 in the Regency style – dormer in hipped roof, voussoirs over round-arched first-floor windows
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln – Beamsville – 4918 King Street – Woodburn Cottage – The land was originally deeded by Crown Patent to Jacob Beam in 1801. The house built about 1834 for James B. Osborne, a merchant, postmaster and private banker. He was a prominent member of the community. The name “Woodburn” is said to have derived from James Osborne’s second wife’s family. The house is Regency Cottage in style. It is built of Flemish double stretcher bond red brick on top of a field stone foundation. The front facade has an impressive double door with sidelights and a fan transom housed in an arched brick surround. Flanking the doorway are four large, shuttered windows, each with twelve panes and flat stone lintels on top. The hipped roof has double-flued, corbeled chimneys on each corner and has a large belvedere on top.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 1 – 127 Brock Street East – Benjamin & Elizabeth Clemence House, Shoemaker – c. 1879
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 2 – 172 King Street South – the original portion, the first homestead in Waterloo, was built about 1812 by Abraham Erb; subsequent additions – white clapboard; wings on either side of center section and second-story balcony added 1855; 6-over-6 arrangement of window panes is a Georgian characteristic; symmetrical front porch between two wings with latticework, Gothic barge board and Doric columns reflects a Regency influence.
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 926 Byron Street South – James Keith Gordon House – 1853 – Regency Cottage
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – 58 Victoria Street South – Ontario Cottage – 1½ story symmetrical red brick, steep hip roof, roof line continues to form roof of open porch, turned posts and balusters
Regency Cottage Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 385 Brant Street – The dwelling was built about 1890 for Thomas A. McCleneghan, Deputy Postmaster and son of Alex R. McCleneghan (81 Perry Street) who was Postmaster. The dwelling is of the Regency style, 1½ stories, low hip roof and cottage appearance. The center door, flanked by large square windows, is typical of this style. The front entrance is flanked by three windows topped with an ellipse shape segmented head window. On the front porch, the ellipse and square designs are repeated in the lattice work. The brick work features beautiful brick work in the drip molding and chimney. Other details include a rectangular patterned verge board, an iron-crested bay window accented with a pair of finals and a continually repeated pattern or rectangular patterns in windows and brickwork.

Romanesque Architecture in Ontario – Top 47 Picks

Romanesque Architecture in Ontario

Romanesque Revival, 1880-1910 – This style hearkens back to medieval architecture of the 11th and 12th centuries with a heavy appearance, blocky towers and rounded arches.

Richardsonian Romanesque Revival, 1870-1910 – is a style of Romanesque Revival architecture which incorporates 11th and 12th century southern French, Spanish and Italian Romanesque characteristics. It emphasizes clear, strong picturesque massing, round-headed Romanesque arches which often spring from clusters of short squat columns, recessed entrances, richly varied rustication, blank stretches of walls contrasting with bands of windows, and cylindrical towers with conical caps embedded in the walls.

Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Toronto – Queen’s Park – In 1859 the city leased land from King’s College and in 1860 a park named after Queen Victoria was opened by the Prince of Wales. The main block of the massive Romanesque Revival Parliament Buildings with its towering legislative block was completed in 1892.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 415 Hunter Street – 1892 – County Court House – Richardsonian Romanesque style -2½ story, rose sandstone with white sandstone lintels and drip molding, steep pitch irregular slate roof, wall dormers with parapet walls topped with finial, semi-circular windows above double hung windows, recessed double doors, framed with Roman arch, supported by pillars, two pillars have carved monkey heads, 2,2 story semi-circular bay windows, large stone newel posts flank stairs, towers, turrets and elaborate chimneys, Centenary stone mounted in the central buttress
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 1 – The Arlington Hotel, 106 Grand River Street North – c. 1850s, 1888 – 4-storey stucco and yellow brick reminiscent of the Chateau style, Romanesque style arcades supported by red-brown marble columns at the street level, octagonal tower, arched and rectangular window
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 1 – 212 Barrie Street – In 1890, Chalmers Free Presbyterian Church was planned at the triangle of land formed by Barrie, Clergy and Earl Streets. The Union of the Congregational Church, Methodist Church and Presbyterian Church took place in 1925, electing to join Chalmers. Romanesque Revival style – rounded windows, rose window and quatrefoil windows, tower
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 320 King Street – The impressive Romanesque style limestone structure which now houses the library was built in 1913 as Midland’s first post office, with customs and excise offices on the second floor. – mansard roof, high central gable, imposing corner porch, and tower; 2½ story building composed of even course cut stone, with a belt course that goes around the entire building; metal roof has a decorative stone fascia; some semi-elliptical windows, and a corner entrance. In 1963 the post office, needing more space, moved to its new home on Dominion Avenue and the beautiful limestone building sat empty for three years. In 1967, the library moved to the old post office. Setting your watch by the clock tower would be inadvisable as the four faces do not always agree.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1401 Queen Street West – Romanesque Style – circa 1899 – This house, built for members of the Algie family, is clad in the same imported red brick as that used at #1414 across the street. The house has a double arched entry with intricate brickwork detailing and terracotta hood (or drip) molds above the entry and windows; three symmetrical and identical roof gables face north, east and west. Dr. James Algie lived here and kept a horse and buggy in the carriage house to the rear for visiting patients.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Aylmer Book 2 – 46 Talbot Street West – Aylmer Town Hall and Municipal Offices – clock tower, dormers, cupola, arched window voussoirs – built in 1913 in Romanesque style
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 1 – 201 Church Street – St. Thomas Anglican Church – 1870s – Traditional Norman-style (Romanesque) church, joined to a modern glass-enveloped Parish Centre – rounded windows with muntins, quoining, buttresses, finials, beveled dentil molding
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville – 144 King Street East – Armouries – stone – 1900 – Romanesque style – battlement parapet, stone string courses
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fort Erie – 575 Central Avenue – This former church, now called The Bell Tower has been repurposed to provide a place for meetings. In the Main Event Room is the venue for comedy shows, live bands and Karaoke for kids and adults.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville -165 King Street East – Romanesque style, tower, Palladian window in gable with cornice return, large decorative chimney, round window arch, circular window, open pediment, enclosed veranda
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Goderich – 52 Montreal Street – Goderich Public Library was opened in 1903 as a Carnegie library. It is in the Romanesque Revival style with the large round tower, the round-headed windows, and the irregular roof.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cornwall – 28 Second Street East – St. John’s Presbyterian Church – 1888 – Romanesque style – dentil molding, trefoil decoration on tower
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – Centenary United Church, 24 Main Street West – 1868 – In the Victorian Romanesque style; buttresses, corbelled dentils
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 3 – 212 Barrie Street – Intersection of Barrie, Clergy and Earl Streets – Chalmers United Church – 1890 – Romanesque style, rose windows, quatrefoils, rounded tower, columns with Corinthian capitals
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 4 – 110 Sydenham Street (corner of Johnson) – First Baptist Church – Romanesque style, voussoirs with keystones, columns surrounding doorways
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 4 – Queen’s Theological Hall – Romanesque style – limestone – four-story tower, Corinthian pillars surrounding entrance
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 6 – Ordnance Street – Institute of the Sisters of Charity – House of Providence – 1838 – Romanesque style, Jacobean gable, crenelated roof line, finials, Buttresses, quatrefoils – Its heritage is rooted in the creativity and spirituality of Vincent de Paul and Louise de Marillac, in the willingness of Emilie Gamelin to risk and trust in Providence, in the responsiveness of the Montreal Sisters of Providence to the call of Bishop E.J. Horan, the ecclesiastical founder, and in the courage and pioneer spirit of Catherine McKinley, the first general superior and proclaimed Kingston foundress, and the original members of the Kingston community
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Merrickville – 206 Main Street East – Percival House (Ardcaven) – c. 1890 – Richardsonian-Romanesque style – home of foundry-man Roger Percival – heavy stone arch around door, decorative chimney, two-story bay window topped with open pediment, dormer, tower, stone courses
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 1265 Wyld Street – St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church – It is in the Romanesque style with the heavy massing achieved through the use of local cut stone, round headed arches over most openings, and the twin towers. This is the first French Roman Catholic church constructed in North Bay. It was built in 1914 by Henri Marceau with the help of local parishioners. The original building was a simple basement with a low tin embossed ceiling. In 1932, a new superstructure was designed by B. A. Jones Architects from Kitchener, Ontario, which was built over the existing structure. The commanding hilltop on which the church is built establishes this building as a visual landmark in the immediate community.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 283 Broadway – Romanesque – massive shape, tower on side and front, large arches over windows
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 95 Somerset Street West at corner of Cartier Street – St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Church – 1933 – Romanesque Revival
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 164 Grand River Street North – Paris Presbyterian Church – Romanesque Revival design built in 1893 – turrets, conical towers, round stained glass rose window, terracotta detailing
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Penetanguishene – 28 Robert Street West – St. Ann’s Catholic Church – positioned to overlook the town and the bay – constructed with limestone between 1886 and 1902; it serves a bilingual Catholic community with services held in French and English – Romanesque style
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 690 Queen Street East/107 East Street – Sault Ste. Marie Museum – The Old Post Office is an imposing three story red brick and stone building featuring a clock tower. It is prominently located in downtown Sault Ste. Marie at the intersection of Queen Street East and East Street. Built between 1902 and 1906 as a federal building, it was purchased in 1982 by the City for use as the Sault Ste. Marie Museum. It is a fine example of turn of the century Federal architecture in Ontario, combining Victorian classicism with excellent workmanship. Exterior elements include classical pediments, pilasters and cornices, Romanesque stone arches with Italianate detailing and decorative features. Inside there is an oak staircase, an exquisite three-story light well and skylight, and a plated glass floor.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 – 220 Murray Street – Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment Peterborough Garrison – Central Park was an ideal site for a military training area with its expansive grounds and location – accessible by foot, horse and wagon. A drill shed was built in 1867 and used for bank practices, dances and military activities. Drill sheds were built in many communities across Canada after the Fenian Raids of 1866. The shed was destroyed by fire in 1909, just before the Peterborough Armoury was opened on May 24. The Armoury was built during a nation-wide spending program for the militia in response to the Boer War. The Armoury included a parade hall, living quarters for infantry, cavalry, and artillery, a firing range, and a bowling alley. The Peterborough Armouries were built in the Romanesque style with turrets, arched troop doors, and crenelated roof line.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 –Peterborough Collegiate circa 1917 – McDonnel Street – Romanesque Revival architecture
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – Petrolia Line – Romanesque, three-story turret, decorative iron railing on second floor balcony
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 380 King Street – The only example of Romanesque Revival in Port Colborne, this home was built about 1907 for Thomas Euphronius Reeb. The Romanesque is shown in its dark red brick and heavy cut stone window sills and lintels. The Queen Anne influence is evident in the octagonal tower with lard “band shell” verandah, wide round-arched first floor window with etched leaded glass and a line of terracotta tiles with egg and dart motif under the eaves.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 2 – 1001 Firelane No. 1 – The William Brown House – Established in 1898 by Frank Fulton Brown and the Dann brothers, the Lorraine Summer resort was located on almost one kilometer of fine sandy beach and named for the Brown’s daughter. The structure is a timber frame construction with large, pillar-like stone protrusions on both the front and rear of the building. The cut limestone used is the same as that used to construct the entrance gate pillars on Lorraine Road. The peaked gable ends and the arches above the windows indicate the work of a master stonemason. The architecture is reminiscent of the Richardsonian Romanesque style of architecture.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 28 Bedford Street – This large 2½ story four bay brick house is built in the Romanesque Revival style with a large irregular plan, heavy masonry, steeply pitched roof, tall chimneys, recessed porch, and oriel windows. The imposing entrance way is composed of a shingled pediment and round arches of corbelled and stepped brick with decorative panels on either side of corbelled brick.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 131 Walton Street – St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church – c. 1906 – This is brick over a cast stone base and, essentially, of the Romanesque Revival style. Massive towers frame the front with an arcaded porch between sheltering the tower entrances and above, the gabled front to the sanctuary and its rear gallery. Windows to towers display simple stained glass in Art Nouveau designs, the taller west tower with louvered openings to the bell stage and with a short spire above. The shorter east tower has a hipped roof. The chimney is a massive shaft very much contributing to the architectural silhouette. A fine rose window, also exhibiting Art Nouveau designs, dominates the front gable but lights only the loft space above the sanctuary. Brickwork has ornamentation in hood molds over windows, a corbelled frieze and pilasters.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 75 Huron Street – Consolidated Lake Superior Company General Office Building (now St. Marys Paper Inc.) – built at the turn of the century in Richardsonian Romanesque industrial architecture with round arched openings and massive rough faced masonry
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Seaforth – 52 Main Street – Post Office – Romanesque Revival architecture with square center clock tower and round-headed windows. It was built from 1911-1913. There are dormers in the rooftop.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smiths Falls – 30 Russell Street East – old Post Office – Romanesque style – designed by Thomas Fuller, Dominion Architect, in 1894; clock was added in 1915 – local red sandstone on a foundation of Beckwith limestone with stone trim from Nova Scotia
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 – 95 Church Street – First United Church was constructed in 1877 in the Lombard Romanesque style of architecture which is characterized by a gable roof across the front of the church and a projecting entrance. It has rounded arches for doors and window openings. Four detailed buttresses rise up as towers, each supporting a small metal spire. The twelve-petal stained glass rose window is a prominent feature on the front facade. It is now known as Royal House Redeemed Christian Church of God.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 -99 Ontario Street – St. Thomas Church – 1879 – Richardson Romanesque style with four story tower and a two-story tower, rose window
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 1 – 13 Main Street South – Sunnyside – c. 1888 – was constructed by Dr. E.E. Kitchen. It was the heartbeat of Main Street. It was the home of the inaugural meeting of the St. George Women’s Institute, January 13, 1903. This Romanesque Revival mansion was built as a residence and doctor’s office. On the third floor there was a ballroom.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 2 – 175 Queen Street East – St. Mary’s Town Hall – This Romanesque Revival building was built in 1901 of local limestone with red sandstone as the contrasting elements for window arches and checkerboard effects in the facade. The massive entrances on the south and west facades of the building and the two towers on the south add to its lasting beauty. Due to its prominent location on the north side of the main street, and dominating as it does the sky-line of the Town, it plays an important role in the character of the downtown area.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stratford – Perth County Court House, St. Andrew Street – opened May 9, 1887 – High Victorian architecture with terracotta details – It combines bi-chromal (multi-colored) masonry and a variety of building materials with features from different architectural styles. Italianate brackets adorn the cornice, while several Queen Anne features include the medieval tower, molded brick chimneys, and small multiple-paned windows. Several features of the Romanesque Revival style include the round arch windows stretching over two stories, the heavy doors, the contrasting masonry surfaces, the rusticated basement foundation, the wall dormers which peak with a gable at the top, the pinnacle placed off center, Romanesque motifs adorning the soffits, and miniature columns complete with capitals which embellish the arched windows on the front and side facades. The soffits of the cornice immediately above the terracotta panel are adorned with an intricate rose and maple leaf pattern.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay – Port Arthur Book 1 – 294 Red River Road – St. Andrew’s Roman Catholic Church, A.D. 1924, is traditional with its longitudinal plan and Romanesque style details. The windows and doors have round arches with stone label surrounds. Stepped buttresses in pairs project from the corners of the building and from the four-story central projecting tower with ornamental crenelations. The tower has a pyramidal roof and rises 117 feet and is topped with a cross. Along the sides of the church, there are buttresses with a large window between each pair. The large window above the main entrance in the tower is elaborated with many circles above the four rounded-arch windows included within the same framework. The stain glass repeats the circular motif with crosses.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 35 King Street North – Post Office built 1911-1913 – Romanesque style – rusticated sandstone on ground floor and around upper floor windows; red brick for upper floors; semicircular arches for windows and entrance ways (lowest level); on the top story, a steeply sloped copper-clad face over two corbelled courses of stone, and tall, stone dormers below a flat roof; corner clock tower with pediment
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 3 – 2879 Riverside Drive East – Our Lady of the Rosary Church – built 1907-1913 – Romanesque-style brick and stone building could hold about 1,000 people, features two domed bell towers
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – 285 Dundas Street – 1889 – Dundas Street United Church – Ornate Romanesque style – In the front of the church is an immense arch resting on brown buttresses flanked on either side by a massive tower. The arch encloses a spacious porch which is approached by a set of steps the full width of the opening. There is artistic detail in the red brick and credit valley brown stone design in the cornices and molding.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – Finkle Street – The Oxford Hotel, located across from Market Square and the Town Hall in Woodstock was built in 1880 as “The O’Neill House” in Romanesque style. It saw guests such as Oscar Wilde and Reginald Birchall.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 210 Vansittart Avenue – built in 1895 by Thomas Leopold “Carbide” Wilson, inventor of the first commercial calcium-carbide process for the manufacturer of acetylene gas. It was the residence of the Sisters of St. Joseph’s until 1975. It is a voluptuous two-story house with finished attic of irregular shape in Richardsonian Romanesque style using contrasting brick, cut stone and hanging tiles – stone main floor, red brick second floor; steep red slate roof, red tiles in gable end and small casement windows, several balconies, large shed roof verandah, brick posts, turned balusters, lattice skirt, a porte-cochere for people to be protected from weather when leaving buggy or cars, off-set tower
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Curries – Wesley Memorial Church erected A.D. 1891 – Romanesque style – beveled dentil molding

Edwardian Architecture in Ontario – Top 42 Picks

Edwardian Architecture in Ontario

Edwardian, 1900-1930 – This style bridges the ornate and elaborate styles of the Victorian era and the simplified styles of the 20th century. Edwardian Classicism provided simple, balanced facades, simple roof lines, dormer windows, large front porches, and smooth brick surfaces. Voussoirs and keystones are used sparingly and are understated. Finials and cresting are absent. Cornice brackets and braces are block-like and openings have flat arches or plain stone lintels.

Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford – 126 King Street – Post Office – A.D. 1914 – Two-story smooth red brick structure has ashlar stone lintels and string courses at the window liens. It is sometimes called Edwardian in style because it was built during the reign of King Edward VII. The clock tower is a landmark for the business district.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dunnville Book 1 – 241 Broad Street West – The Lalor Estate is a two-and-a-half-story residence with a four-gable roof and a wraparound veranda with fluted columns. This Edwardian structure was built in 1905. Its builder was Francis Ramsey Lalor, a prominent Dunnville businessman, politician, philanthropist, and entrepreneur. His business interests included two dry goods stores, a grocery store, an apple evaporator, natural gas wells, the F.R. Lalor Canning Factories, the F.R. Lalor Ashes Company, and the Monarch Knitting Mills. The exterior walls are red brick. There is a two-story bay window, Tudor-style timbering in the gable, a pediment above the entrance with a decorative tympanum, and sidelights beside the front door.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smithville – 121 West Street – Edwardian – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 50 Albert Street – 1903 – Snyder-Seagram House – Edwardian Classical in parged concrete – superposed sets of Palladian windows and bay windows projecting over both stories; curved, wraparound verandah with classical columns
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 331 Centre Street South
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1460 Queen Street West – circa 1900 – This 1½ story frame house with the ‘clipped’ center gable end to the street has a west facing dormer window more typical of Edwardian Classical style. The house was built after the 1898 Alton fire insurance map was printed. The house has been cladded with a modern brick veneer with contrasting brickwork trim made to resemble the Victorian Gothic style of the neighboring Mechanics Institute.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – Edwardian – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Galt Book 1 (Cambridge) – 54 Blenheim Road – Edwardian style with Palladian window in gable
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Preston (Cambridge) – 519 Queenston Road – Italianate/ Edwardian style, Palladian window in gable
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Chatsworth – Edwardian
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Chesley – #140 – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 1 – 135 King Street West – 1902 – William Academy – Now a private school, this building was formerly the home of Cobourg Collegiate. Many men from the town who served in WW1 attended high school here and some of them returned to finish their studies after their time at the front. Built in 1902 in a style known as Edwardian Classical, the building features oversized Palladian windows on the second level which add drama to its front facade. Additions to the school building were made in 1939 and during the 1960s, but in 2015 the collegiate moved to a new facility on King Street East.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Conestogo – Edwardian – 2 story tower-like bay, fretwork, Romanesque style window arches, 2nd floor balcony, cobblestone basement
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 82 Sydenham Street – Edwardian style – palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton and Bolton Book – Bolton – 56 Sterne Street – circa 1900 – This ‘four square’ red brick house is built in the Edwardian Classical style, characterized by an asymmetric floor plan, attic dormer window, full front verandah with classical column supports and pyramidal hipped roof. For many years into the 1960s, it was the home of Mrs. Alice Goodfellow and her twin sister Miss Monkman.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 181 Oxford Street – This cement block house was built for R.A. Skinner who owned and operated Skinner’s Livery on the north side of Charles Street at the Oxford corner. Stained-glass panel on first floor window; pediment above porch with Doric pillars; a lion on either side of the front steps. This home was the scene of many elaborate house parties, the form of entertainment that made up the fabric of social life of the times. The Skinner Livery, sometimes referred to as the Bon Ton Livery, maintained vehicles for pleasure driving, business trips, weddings, funerals, etc.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kitchener Book 1 – 132 Water Street – Edwardian style with dormer in attic, balcony above the verandah
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 427 King Street – 1902 – medium gabled roof with a half-round window; gingerbread trim on fascia; exterior is cedar shingles and stretcher brick; brick voussoirs and window shutters; transom window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 2 – Hugel Avenue – Edwardian – Palladian window, pediment above pillared veranda with open railing
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Mount Pleasant – 1229 Highway 54 – Edwardian, Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 200 First Avenue West – Former Normal School/Teacher’s College opened in 1909 with an enrollment of 25 students and continued in operation until 1972. This design is exemplary of the architectural influence of the Edwardian style. The observatory-like dome, the elaborate cornices and the formal entrance are three main characteristics of the building.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 6 York Street – Edwardian style – corner quoins, paired cornice brackets, triangular pediment supported by columns
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 65 Broadway – Edwardian Classicism – large triangular front gable with Palladian window and shallow roofed porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 3 – 27 Zina – Edwardian Classicism built in 1923 with large triangular front gable with Palladian window and shallow roofed porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 12 Cartier Street – Edwardian – voussoirs above stained glass window, cornice brackets, Palladian window in gable, and Ionic capitals on porch pillars with balcony above
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 18 Banfield Street – Edwardian style – Palladian window, turret extending through the roof
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 50 Herriot Street – Kininvie (means where my family lives) was built of reddish sandstone in 1906 for textile manufacturer Thomas A. Code – grand Edwardian – said to have been heated by steam from the factory across the street
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 232 Clarence Street – Built by lawyer Louis Kinnear in 1904, it was the home of his daughter Judge Helen Kinnear from 1904-1943, the year she became the first federally appointed woman judge in Canada and the Commonwealth. Helen Kinnear was also the first woman in the Commonwealth to be granted in 1934, “King’s Council,” a distinction given to noteworthy lawyers. She was also the first woman lawyer to appear before the Supreme Court of Canada. The house exhibits a combination of Edwardian and Victorian architectural styles.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Elgin Book 2 – Yellow brick – Edwardian – two-and-a-half story tower-like bay with projecting eaves and large fretwork pieces resembling brackets – matching fretwork piece over lower window to left of porch and below porch roof
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 126 Walton Street – Wilson-Benson House – c. 1885 – This two and a half story brick house is built in the Queen Anne Revival style with an offset tower, a broad verandah, and a steeply pitched roof. The gable on the Walton Street facade is sheathed in decorative shingle. The tower is five-sided with a conical roof topped by a finial and contains a long window on each story of each wall surface. The large main floor window is Edwardian in treatment with colored glass in the semi-circular transom section. For fifty years, the Wilsons were publishers of the Port Hope Guide.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 91-93 Mill Street North – Deyell Terrace – c. 1890 – 91 and 93 Mill Street are, respectively, the south and middle sections of a row of three attached related buildings. The two-bay, two story houses are constructed of brick laid in garden wall bond. The roof is of medium pitch with a front gable containing a decorative finial. The doorways are in a projecting frontispiece and are composed of paired doors containing long round-headed windows with square panels below. A transom with one dividing muntin is contained above. The windows in the projecting frontispiece below the gable are Edwardian in style with segmental stained-glass transoms above two vertically divided panes. A small mainly decorative round-headed louvered window is placed below the gable.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 2 – 223 George Street – 1900 – Edwardian – Palladian window, wraparound verandah supported by pillars, pediment with decorated tympanum, dentil molding
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 1048 Queen Street East – This residence is situated on a large treed lot at the south west corner of Queen Street East and Upton Road in the east end of the central residential core. William Howard Hearst established a legal practice in Sault Ste. Marie in 1888 and in 1904 built “Eastbourne” as his residence, naming it for its location in the east end of town. In 1908 Hearst became the Member of Provincial Parliament for Algoma and in 1914 the first Premier of Ontario from Northern Ontario. Eastbourne is a good example of Edwardian architecture using local materials. It was constructed in 1904 with a ‘t-shaped’ plan; each of the arms are the same width and projection. Two-stories in height with a full basement and attic, it is constructed of soft red brick and local red sandstone. It has a gabled roof and the attic gables are clad with painted wood shingles. The deep cornice and soffits have decorative brackets. Large bow windows dominate the east and west facades. The sash windows are triple and double hung. The porch has a broken pediment, pilasters and triple clusters of truncated Doric columns. The basement and porch foundations are of local red sandstone.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 2 – 339 Glen Morris Road East – Edwardian, Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stouffville Book 1 – 2 Albert Street – Built c. 1895 for James McConnachie, the Manager of the Toronto Fruit and Vinegar Works – two stories, Edwardian style (board and batten addition)
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay (Port Arthur Book 2) – 27 Cumberland Street South – In 1909, land was purchased by Molson Company in downtown Port Arthur to build a bank. The three-story building had offices on the second floor and bank manager’s quarters on the third floor, and featured a beautiful exterior made of limestone mined from the Rossport area. Molson’s bank opened in 1912 and did banking business with families of loggers, miners, shippers, and prospectors of the Port Arthur area. The architecture style is Edwardian Classicism. Prominent features of the building include the rusticated stone on the ground-floor walls and large keystones. Doric columns surround the main entrance and there is a heavy string course between the first and second stories. In 1954, the building was sold to the Bank of Montreal which operated here until 1984.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay (Fort William Book 2) – 121 McKellar Street South – Built in 1907 for owner Thomas P. Kelley, a local merchant, the house was later sold to Dr. R. Kerr Dewar who had fought in the First World War, returned home to study medicine and purchased this home in 1920. The first floor was converted to a medical clinic in 1928. The building is a good example of Edwardian Classicism. It has metal cresting on one of the dormer windows. The first and second floors both have distinctive Palladian windows with prominent keystones. On the front facade, the centrally placed wood covered porch is supported by brick piers. There is a two-story bay window.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 2 – 44 Baldwin Street – c. 1914 – 2½ story frame residential building in the Edwardian Classic style, brick cladding, hip gable roof, L-shape with a wing projecting from the main block gable end to the street, a flat-roofed verandah with open porch above
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 1 – 841 Kildare Road – Miers-Fraser House built 1904 – Edwardian, Palladian window, two-story bay, Ionic columns supporting a pediment
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 849 Victoria Avenue – 1907 – Edwardian – rounded bay, flared eaves, a columned porch with pediment, dormer, hipped roof, red brick with stone trim
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 376 Drew Street – c. 1852 – Edwardian – L shape two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof with one gable dormer and one gable both with green painted shingles in a pattern, gable end has Palladian window with decorated cornice in apex, center door is protected by square piers, open porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 155 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1860s – Edwardian – symmetrical two story with attic, painted wood siding with decorative shingles between floors, steep hip roof, gable dormer, deep cornice and dentils, 1-over-1 rectangular windows with Palladian center window, centered door with rectangular transom, cement platform porch

Georgian Architecture in Ontario – Top 39 Picks

Georgian Architecture in Ontario

Georgian, before 1860 – This style began with the British King Georges in the 18th century. These buildings have balanced facades around a central door, medium-pitched gable roofs, and small-paned windows.

Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – 477 Main Street – Rockwood Academy – Georgian style – three-story stone building with limestone walls, rough-cut quoins, symmetrical five-bay facade with double-hung six-over-six wood sash windows with a central door with a portico and a transom window and sidelights. Low-pitched cedar-shingle gable roof with many small brick and stone chimneys – The owner’s bedrooms still exist on the second floor, as do the students’ bedrooms on the third floor. The south wing still contains the classroom below the student bedrooms. The west wing remains unaltered and contains a carriage house on the ground floor with a gymnasium above.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – Wilson Street – Township Hall – constructed in 1871, a stone building in the Georgian style of architecture with a Neo-Classical portico and an Italianate cupola.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Caledonia – 80 Caithness Street East – formerly Caledonia Town Hall – 1856 – Classical Georgian design – pediment above front entrance, pilasters, dentil molding below cornice, cupola on roof, arched window voussoirs and keystones
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Amherstburg Book 1 – 525 Dalhousie Street – Bellevue House – 1816-1819 – One of the finest remaining examples of domestic Georgian Neo-Classical architecture in Ontario – the home of Robert Reynolds, the commissary to the garrison at Fort Malden, and his sister, Catherine Reynolds, an accomplished landscape painter who worked in pencil, crayon, sepia wash and water colors recording scenes along the Detroit River and Lake Erie
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grimsby – 126 Main Street West – Nelles Manor is a historic home completed in 1798 by Colonel Robert Nelles, a Loyalist from the Mohawk Valley, New York. The house is considered to be the oldest inhabited dwelling between Niagara and Kingston. It was built in the Georgian style of locally quarried stone over a ten-year period (1788-98). Built facing north and Lake Ontario on an old path called Squire Nelles’ Lane, the main entrance was later moved to the south on the other side, with a pillared porch facing on to the new Stone Road (now Main Street). The Neo-Classical portico was added in the early 1820s. This home served as Nelles’ residence during his lengthy career as Justice of the Peace, Member of the Legislative Assembly and Commander of the 14th Lincoln Militia. Colonel Nelles’ office was a small room on the north side, where he performed many marriages before clergy were available. The house was a center for gala events and remained in the Nelles family possession until 1963. It has seven fireplaces, walnut woodwork and spacious halls and rooms. Originally a private residence, it was turned into a museum in 2016 and is now open to the public.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 19767 Main Street – Agnes and John S. Meek House – circa 1853 – This two-story Georgian style house with roughcast exterior and massive return eaves is one of Alton’s earliest homes. John Meek, a merchant and hotel owner, was named Alton’s first postmaster in 1854 and this house became the post office. After his death in 1866, Agnes Meek was appointed postmistress, followed in 1876 by their son James who served until 1883. The Meek’s son Thomas owned the house until 1950.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 1 – 42 Cross Street – Georgian style architecture
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford – 55 Maple Avenue North – Stuart House – 1886 – was built by Elijah Stuart in the Georgian Symmetry style with Italianate features, segmental arched windows, double brackets under the eaves and quoining on the corners. The double-hung front door has a fanlight and the second-floor door has a keystone arch linking the same color detail line across the front of the house.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Galt Book 1 (Cambridge Book 1) – 1 Brant Road North – Georgian style, dormers in attic, Italianate style veranda with pillars
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
York – 39 Front Street South – The Enniskillen Lodge, formerly the Barber Hotel, was built in 1862 for Mr. Daniel Barber, a prominent local hotelier. Large Georgian style windows, doors, and brick detailing are spaced and designed symmetrically. It has a projected cornice with dentils, Regency four-panel door with sidelights and rectangular transom, hood molds over windows, horizontal banding, and corner quoins.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 5 – 10 Chapel Street – c. 1841 – This house has Georgian features – balanced facade, medium-pitched roof, and robust end chimneys. Its rather heavy and severe doorway, with its single panel, is characteristic of the Greek Revival style.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton – 136 Old Danforth Road – Grover House – This two-story (white with dark green shutters) symmetrical designed house with central front door typifies the Georgian style. It was built in c. 1822 by John Grover, an early (1798) settler from Grafton Massachusetts. The hamlet was named after his home town. The original windows would have had 9 over 9, small glass panes. The replacement windows and white cedar clapboard are probably from around 1900. The clapboard still covers the original cedar shingle siding. John Grover gave the land, across from his house, to the Presbyterian Church, now United Church.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – 21 Stuart Street – Georgian style, belvedere, window voussoirs with keystones, portico
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 4 – 43 Inglewood Drive – Georgian style, dormers, balcony
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Merrickville – 905 St. Lawrence Street – The Aaron Merrick House – built in 1844 of local stone with refined stone window surrounds and oversized stone quoins for the son of the founder of Merrick’s Mills – Georgian style with distinct Neo-classical detailing; dormers; semi-elliptical fanlight with sidelights frame a door found within a pedimented portico that is light and elegant
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 3 – 12549 Niagara Parkway – Danner House Bed and Breakfast – It was built in 1805 by American immigrant Ulrich Strickler, after moving from Pennsylvania in 1801. It is a stone building with a stucco finish in an early Loyalist Georgian style. The Danner-Sherk House is a solid construction of stone with a white stucco finish, four irregularly spaced bays across the front and a low-pitched roof. The house has the original front entry including the side lights, six-panel door and wood paneling in the door recess. During the War of 1812, his crops and supplies were taken by American troops leaving him with little for survival. Later the house was occupied by the British. After the war in 1816, the house was sold to Joseph Danner, a Quaker from Pennsylvania who moved to Canada in 1807. Danner owned the property from 1816 until 1847; during this period, he reconstructed sections of the home and continued to farm the land. The house was again occupied by troops during the 1837-1838 rebellion as were most homes during this time.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara-on-the-Lake Book 1 – 209 Queen Street – The Charles Inn c. 1832 – Georgian style – The house was constructed in 1832 by Charles Richardson, a barrister and Member of Parliament. He used the house as his principle residence and later as his summer house. The verandahs and servant’s wing on the east side of the house were added in the end of the last century.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oakville – 1835 – David Patterson, Shipbuilder – #19 – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 63 Broadway – James Graham – Tavern Keeper c. 1852 – Greystones Inn – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oshawa Book 1 – Centre Street South – Georgian style, dormers
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 59-61 Banfield Street – Georgian – two-story frontispiece with pediment
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Parry Sound – 10 Gibson Street – Bayside Inn
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 66 Craig Street – Inge-Va (a Tamil word meaning “come here”) Museum – local sandstone house – 1824 – Colonial Georgian style of an Ontario cottage – balanced facade, sidelights and transom
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 – 404 Belmont Avenue – Georgian, dormers in attic
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 21 Dorset Street East – John David Smith House (The Bluestone) – c. 1834 – The two-story house is rectangular in plan. The basement is of random rubble and the four end chimneys are brick. The style of the house is Greek Revival. Although the symmetry and the rectangular plan are typical of the Georgian style, much of the exterior and interior detail is definitely Greek in derivation. The house is well-proportioned and balanced with nine windows on the main and rear facades and six windows on the west end (one false).
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 4 – 314 Vidal Street North – Georgian, pillared entrance with curved pediment, dentil molding, decorative cornice, voussoirs and keystones, sidelights and transom window
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 831 Queen Street East – The Ermatinger Old Stone House is a two-story stone structure built on the north bank of the St. Mary’s River near the rapids in Sault Ste. Marie. The house provides a link to Sault Ste. Marie’s role in the fur trade and to one of its earliest settlers. Charles Oakes Ermatinger, a member of a prominent Montreal family who joined the Northwest Company and married Charlotte Katawabeda, the daughter of the Paramount Chief of the Ojibway, built the house in 1812-1814 of local red sandstone in a style characteristic of vernacular Georgian architecture but employed Quebec construction techniques. The house quickly became the center of government in the northwest part of the province and of the business and social life of the district. It later served as the first courthouse, a post office and a hotel. The house served as the headquarters of Sir Garnet Wolseley in 1870 when the expedition he commanded stopped at Sault Ste. Marie enroute to quell the Red River Rebellion and to establish Canadian sovereignty over Manitoba and the Northwest Territories.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 109 Norfolk Street South – Eva Brook Donly Museum – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Southampton – Walker House – a popular meeting place for food and spirits since 1915 – Georgian style – 146 High Street – a historic hotel in the village since the 1860s
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Southwest Oxford Township – Delmer – Brownsville Road
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines, Book 4 – 101 King Street – former Court House – Georgian style – 1848-1849 – The visible James and King Street facades are of channeled Queenston ashlars while the concealed west and north walls are constructed with a course rubble limestone and brick, respectively. The front facade has a tower with a three-faced striking clock and is topped by an octagonal cupola. The clock continues to chime with the assistance of the original weights which extend from the clock tower to the first floor. The entrance to the building is carved in stone like the town hall in Perugia, Italy. It features upright balustrades which conform to the slope of the stairway. The supporting columns under the copings on each side are individually carved to fit its specific location. The northeast wing cut-stone addition to the original structure was built in 1865 to accommodate the County offices and courthouse.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 2 – 129 Oakland Road – Built by Mordecai Westbrook, a member of one of the original families of Oakland. Georgian style with original double hung six over six windows and shutters. The walls are triple-bricked with bricks said to have been made on site. The widow’s walk and rear stone coach house are both original.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stoney Creek – The Nash-Jackson House was originally located at the north-east corner of King Street East and Nash Road in Hamilton. The house was built in 1818 in the Georgian style. The house was moved to Stoney Creek Battlefield Park in 1999.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln (Jordan) – 3812 Main Street, Jordan Station – Georgian style – curved pediment above door
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 2 – 39 Main Street North – Former Commercial Hotel Building and Property – Hobby Horse Arms – c. 1868 – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterford – Georgian – six-over-six windows, Doric pillars, widow’s walk on rooftop, sidelights and transom window around door
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 3 – 20 Menno Street – Conrad Fenner, carpenter and joiner, built his own wood frame house in 1867; he enlarged his 1½ story home to a full 2 stories in 1886 – Georgian style, pediment above entrance, fluted half columns, cornice brackets, granite field stone foundation
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 942 Victoria Avenue – Georgian with eyebrow window in roof, pillared entrance with rounded pediment
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 447 Hunter Street – 1913 – Neo-Georgian architecture, Neo-Classical door – symmetrical two story, red brick, once Presbyterian manse, parapet ends on gable roof, decorative stone keystone and stone

Gothic Architecture in Ontario – Top 36 Picks

Gothic Architecture in Ontario

Gothic Revival, 1830-1890 – These decorative buildings have sharply-pitched gables with highly detailed verge boards, pointed-arch window openings, and dichromatic brickwork. It is a common style in Ontario.

Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ajax, Pickering Book – 1709 Highway 7 Road, Brougham – The Former Commercial Hotel in Brougham, Ontario is a two-story brick building in the Gothic Revival style with a gable roof and has pointed arched windows in two dormers with finials and decorative wood fascia. It was initially built as a home and then converted into a hotel.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 301 Centre Street South – c. 1875 – built for William Hood, a retired Whitby farmer and son of an English settler – rubble-stone foundation, white clapboard building, two-story vernacular Gothic Revival
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – 117 Wilson Street West – c. 1855 – Gothic Revival, two-story red brick house, verge board trim and finials on gables, corner quoins, bay windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 63-65 Sydenham Street – three gable Gothic Revival Style, finials on gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cheltenham – 14376 Creditview Road – Frederick Haines House – circa 1887 -After losing his first home to the 1887 fire, entrepreneur Frederick Haines, son of Cheltenham’s founder, built this red brick house with intricate yellow brick patterning. Later additions are compatible with the original three gable Victorian Gothic style. In the 1940s-1950s, it became a United Church rest and holiday home. It later housed an antique shop before being converted back to a private residence. It has a bell cast roof over each front bay, an arched entry and etched glass transom and sidelights of the central entrance.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burlington – 2201 Lakeshore Road – Gothic Revival, corner quoins, triple gables, keystones and voussoirs, transom window above double front door
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1581 Queen Street East – Archibald Dick House – circa 1875 -Hotelier Archibald Dick built this very elaborate Victorian Gothic style red brick house with contrasting yellow brick patterning, symmetrical projecting front bays, paired double windows, intricate fretwork and Italianate influenced paired brackets. The house has ten rooms.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 1 – 169 Front Street – Town Hall – designed by local architect John D. Evans and built in 1872-73 by contractor John Forin in High Victorian Gothic Revival style – brick and limestone building with tall lancet windows on the second floor with mullions dividing the windows in two with simple tracery in the arches, a bell-cast mansard roof with dormers, a massive 144-foot clock tower with octagonal buttresses, four large illuminated clock faces and cast iron railings and weather vanes
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt – 22 Blenheim Road – 1½ story Gothic Revival house with large dormers in the attic
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dorchester – 15 Bridge Street – The Signpost – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elmira – 80 Arthur Street South – Gothic Revival, verge board trim
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Erin – 202 Main Street – Gothic Revival – late 1800s – verge board trim and finials on gables, bay window, corner quoins, dichromatic brickwork
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton Bolton Book – Bolton – 25 Nancy Street – Alice Goodfellow House – circa 1884 – This 1½ story Victorian Gothic home was built by George Watson for Alice Goodfellow using local red and yellow brick. The end gable patterning and the enclosed front porch are excellent examples of late nineteenth century urban architecture. Alice’s sister Margaret Smith lived next door. On Alice’s death in 1901, her brother-in-law Albion farmer James Goodfellow and his wife Marion retired here. It was in their family until the owner of 31 Nancy Street purchased it in 1999.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – 88 Fennell Avenue West -Auchmar Estate – Main house named after the Buchanan estate on Loch Lomond, Scotland, built 1852-1854 in the Gothic Revival style
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Innerkip – Tavistock and Innerkip Book – 132 Coleman Street – Gothic – built 1888 – 2 story stone building, steel roof
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kemptville Book – Toledo – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, painted corner quoins and voussoirs
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville – 90 Main Street East – The Jacob Wigle/William Mortan Webb House built 1886 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window, decorative brickwork including sawtooth designs, hood molds over the windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 5775 Peer Street – John Misener Jr. was born in 1829. He was 26 when he purchased the land on Peer Street from his father. His father, Captain John Misener owned and operated a wagon-making business on the corner of Main Street and Peer Street. John Misener Jr. assumed the wagon-making business after his father’s death in 1855. The house, c. 1855, is in the Ontario Gothic style with a central gable in the roof. The gable window design with a pediment is an adaptation of Italianate form. The field stone wall of the verandah was a later addition. The upper portion of the verandah features elaborate woodwork with turned posts.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 429 Ella Street – Lancey Hall built by Henry Warren Lancey – c. 1876 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim and finials on gables, iron cresting above bay window and enclosed front porch
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 115 Dorset Street West – Thomas Clarke House (The Cone) – c. 1858 – The one and a half story grey board and batten house incorporates some elements of the Gothic Revival style. It has steeply pitched gables, the appearance of irregularity because of complex roof patterns, pointed arched openings such as the Gothic window above the doorway, and decorative details including the quatrefoil window tracery in this same window, the barge boards in the gable peaks and the finial. A notable feature of the exterior is, the board and batten, was preferred by Downing for he believed that it was more economical than clapboard, and because it was a bolder method of construction, it better expressed the picturesque beauty essentially belonging to wooden houses. The main facade has three pairs of four over four double-hung sashes, a bay projection containing three casement windows, and five six over six double-hung sashes. The central double doors each have twelve windowpanes.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – 130 Guelph Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables, corner quoins, arched voussoirs, two-story tower-like bay
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 1 – 316 Christina Street North – Mackenzie House – 1856 – Gothic Revival – 2-story brick, high-peaked gable roof, elaborately decorated gable with barge board, finial and two pendants
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smiths Falls – 84 Lombard Street – Gothic – finials and trim on gables, corner quoins, voussoirs with keystones, second floor balcony; bay window with cornice brackets; turned spindle roof supports for veranda
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 1 – 19 Beverly Street East – Gothic – paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Jacobs – 7 Cedar Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 2 – 144 Queen Street West – built in 1865 for James McKay, one of St. Marys first inhabitants – the portico was added in the 1880s; Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gable with finial; transom and sidelights around door
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Thomas – 13 Wellington Street – built in 1881 – Gothic Revival – ornate verge board on dormer and extending wing, roof is surfaced in patterned slate, iron cresting above bay window and above porch, elaborate stone eyebrows surmount the paired windows on the second floor
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Strathroy – 145 Front Street – Gothic – corner quoins, shutters
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stratford – 122 Mornington Street – Gothic Revival triple-gabled home, verge board trim on gables, finials, corner quoins; front door has bracketed transom and sidelight windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – 140 Bidwell Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay – Fort William Book 1 – 808 Ridgeway Street – St. Paul’s Anglican Church – A.D. 1907 Built in the English Gothic style. Cut stone hooded moldings are found over the main entrance with lancet windows on either side. The two asymmetrical towers, a common feature of Gothic style churches, are topped with a crenellated roof line, giving the church a medieval-like appearance. The tallest tower has lancet winds, a rose window and a clock.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln – Beamsville – 5053 King Street – Beam Barnes House c. 1855 – The property was originally granted by the Crown to Samuel Corwin in 1803. His wife was Anna Beam, daughter of Loyalist pioneer Jacob Beam. Her brother, Jacob Beam Jr. built the house between 1852 and 1855. The frame house is an early version of the Gothic Revival style. Notable features are steeply pitched gable roofs with carved finials and cut out quatrefoils worked into the barge board on both the front facade and east wing. The veranda has simple square posts, and the front door has a paned transom and sidelights. The tops of the slender but widely framed windows are surrounded with shaped lintels and decorative keystones.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 1 – 169 Brock Street West – Jones House – Town Constable – c. 1876 – Gothic Revival with verge board trim and finial on gable
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 292 Dundas Street – Maple Lawn House 1860 – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on triple gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 36 Young Street West – a former farmhouse on 300 acres built in 1849 – 1½ story Gothic Revival style, gingerbread barge boards and tall finial on the dormer, broken arch of the gable window, tripartite windows of the front facade – the small second front door gave access to the doctor’s office
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Zorra Township – Embro – 109 Huron Street – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window

Italianate Architecture in Ontario – Top 34 Picks

Italianate Architecture in Ontario

Italianate, 1850-1900 – A two story rectangular building with a mild hip roof, a projecting frontispiece, and generous eaves with ornate cornice brackets was the basis of the style; often there are large sash windows, quoins, ornate detailing on the windows, belvederes and wraparound verandahs. Italianate commercial buildings often have cast iron cresting and elegant window surrounds.

Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Acton – 39 Willow Street – Knox Manse established 1889 – Italianate with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, pediment above pillared porch, fretwork and verge board on gable
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ajax – 497 Kingston Road West, Historic Pickering Village – 1870 – purchased in 1882 by Dr. Field for his daughter. Dr. Field was a practicing physician in Pickering Village and later built his own home directly east of this property. In 1929, Emerson & Henrietta Bertrand purchased the home and raised Allan Irwin. The family gave up the homestead in 1934, only to have it reclaimed in 1977 by their grandson, B. B. Bertrand (son of Allan). The building is a 2½ story brick structure in Italianate architecture.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – 311 Wilson Street East – Italianate, belvedere, paired cornice brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Aylmer – 375 Talbot Street West – Italianate, cornice brackets, two-story tower-like bays, balcony on second floor
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Caledonia – 201 Argyle Street – Italianate, hipped roof, dormer in attic, corner quoins, keystones and voussoirs, dichromatic brickwork, dentil molding under cornice, paired brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cheltenham – 14396 Creditview Road – Henry’s Hotel – circa 1887 – William Henry’s pre-1859 Inn was destroyed in the 1887 fire. He rebuilt, replacing the Inn with this two-story Georgian style frame building with hip roof and brick veneer. He named it ‘Henry’s Hotel’ operating it until his death in 1904. Thomas and Nathaniel Browne took it over as ‘Browne’s Hotel’. It was later a butcher shop with home above. In 1958 it was adapted to commercial/apartment use.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 3 – 110 Ontario Street – 1878 – “Illahee Lodge” – Italianate – built by John Jeffrey, hardware merchant – bay windows, front porch crowned with intricate wrought iron railing
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Collingwood – 199 Third Street – Built in the Italianate tradition for the Toner family, early coal and lumber merchants, this home has retained its elegance with minor alterations since 1882. The interior of the home features a circular staircase, marble fireplaces, plaster medallions and a built-in buffet. The exterior brick work laid in the common bond tradition is highlighted by protruding quoins and plinth in lighter contrasting brick. Decorative brick work adorns the original chimney as well as highlighting the window openings. Brick arch work and keystones decorate the window surrounds in a unique three-tiered stepped arch design. The main front facade contains unique, French doors with recessed mullion and molded panels. The home has a heavily bracketed low hip roof with an east side gable featuring a combination of corniced boxed brackets.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 1 – King Street – Italianate architecture
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elora – 120 Mill Street East – Drew House – Italianate style – dormers in attic, single cornice brackets, wraparound verandah with bric-a-brac
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Erin – 213 Main Street – Italianate – built A.D. 1891 – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, iron cresting above bay window, dichromatic brickwork
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fergus – 150 Union Street – Robert Phillips, Druggist c. 1883 – Italianate, hipped roof, corner quoins, two-story tower-like bay
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fisherville Book – Selkirk – 15 Erie Street North – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, quoins, banding
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fort Erie – 348 Ridge Road North
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Goderich – 65 Montreal Street – The “Garrow House” was built around 1850 and was the residence of James Thompson Garrow who later became Supreme Court Judge and local Judge of the Canadian Exchequer Court. It is in the Italianate style with unusual bracketing, a two-story veranda, large front windows and two end chimneys, a central Palladian window and decorative stone lintels and keystones.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton Bolton Book – Bolton – 31 Nancy Street – *George Smith House – circa 1877 – This Italianate style home was built by George Watson for Margaret and George Smith. The red and yellow bricks were locally made and its exterior architectural features and beautiful enclosed porches are original. Smith, a sign painter and letterer, sat on the first village Council and was noted for his very realistic interior faux-wood graining. Erie Smith Schaefer inherited the house in 1933, living here with her husband Alex of ‘Smith & Schaefer’ Hardware. This dichromatic brick house is in the Italianate style. The orientation of the ‘L’ plan with the enclosed verandah along the south is distinctive. The bracketed eaves, segmentally arched windows and low medium pitch hipped roof are all typical of the Italianate.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grimsby – 390 Main Street West – names for the house are Smith-Geddes House, Thornfield Hall, The Stone House – The two-and-a-half-story stone building was constructed between 1876 and 1878. The Smith-Geddes House was built on a flat area of land amidst orchards of peach and cherry trees. The rural location, close to Lake Ontario to the northeast and the Niagara escarpment to the southwest, creates a unique natural setting. This house is an important example of a high-Victorian country house in the Italianate architectural style rendered in a vernacular form. The stone house has a five-bay facade with a projecting frontispiece, containing the main entrance of wood paneled doors, a transom of colored glass and the etched initials of John Henry Smith. Paired round-headed windows above the center door and a smaller pair on the third floor are under a projecting gable, with a carved-wood verge board. The hip, patterned-slate roof has corniced edges of wood brackets, supporting the soffit. Four chimneys of quarry-faced stone, laid in random ashlar, project from each corner of the house and are decorated with pediment moldings along the stacks. The two flanking bays of the main facade have pairs of square-headed windows on the first floor and segmented arches on the second. The stone work is quarry-faced ashlar with projecting rusticated quoins and window surrounds. A projecting wing on the west side is capped with a gable. A wide bay window with a gable roof projects from the east side. The interior is laid out in a center-hall plan with an ornate wood staircase. The interior woodwork is walnut and oak, with carved mantels in both the east parlor and the dining room. The hallway and stairs are paneled in cherry. The wood windows have louvered shutters that fold into reveals matching the paneling of the windows and detailed baseboards are found throughout. The hall, east parlor and dining room have plaster moldings and plaster ceiling medallions. Elaborate cast-iron grills surround the radiators in each of the rooms. The original porch has been removed and a number of small additions have been made to the rear of the house, including a fire escape.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 291-293 Oxford Street – This home was built around 1880 and illustrates the typical broad bracketed eaves of the Italianate style. Fred J. Stone was one of the earliest occupants of this yellow brick house. He joined Wm. Stones Sons Ltd. in 1907 as manager of the Ingersoll branch. The operation started as a hide and wool business but soon developed into a fertilizer plant, later expanding to make livestock feed concentrates. In the 1920s, it passed into the possession of W.A.C. Forman, a family relative. At this time the house was divided to accommodate two units. His father owned the “FAIR”, a store at 126 Thames St. South which sold dry goods and household furnishings and utensils. It has a hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, and corner quoins.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville Book 1 – 86 Division Street South – 2-story brick house built in 1882 in the Italianate style, hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, dormer, cut field stone foundation, three large brick chimneys
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Listowel – 185 Binning Street West – Italianate with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, paired cornice brackets, balcony on second floor, cornice return on gable, built in 1872
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
London – Italianate style with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, pediment above verandah
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Lucknow Book – Mitchell – Italianate, cornice brackets, fretwork, decorative pillars on porch and pediment, 2½ story tower-like bay
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
New Hamburg Book 1 – 145 Peel Street – Italianate with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay, wraparound verandah, decorative window voussoirs and keystones, single cornice brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 374 Fraser Street – Angus Block – 1914 – This building is noted for its parapet at the roof line and for its highly distinctive white stone window surrounds consisting of stepped lintels, quoined jambs and flat sills. Other notable features include the toothed heading of the in-stepped brick facing and bracketed canopy over the third-floor paired openings. The date stone indicates that H.W. Angus, an early architect in North Bay, was responsible for its design and erection.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 11 Little York Street – Italianate – buff-colored brick banding and keystones and voussoirs, paired cornice brackets
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 44-50 Sparks Street at corner of Elgin – Scottish Ontario Chambers – Italianate design – four-story brick building with a high ground floor, balanced facade, decorative multi-colored masonry, radiated voussoirs of multicolored brick, fenestration (the arrangement, design and proportioning of windows and doors), roof line with heavy bracketing and decorated cornice
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 416 Warren Avenue – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, bric-a-brac on verandah
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 322 King Street – Ingleside – It was built in 1867 for Charles H. Carter and occupied by the Carter family for 118 years, including Port Colborne’s first mayor, Dewitt Carter. The two-story structure has projecting eaves supported by paired cornice brackets and corner quoins in dichromatic brick characteristic of Italianate architecture. Its rectangular plan with projecting frontispiece and hipped roof indicate it is a version of a house plan popularized by the magazine “The Canada Farmer” in 1865. The grounds are surrounded by a locally produced cast iron fence.
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Shelburne Administration, Grace Tipling Hall, Police Station – corner of Main Street East and Victoria Street – Italianate style, paired cornice brackets, dichromatic brickwork, three-story tower with cap and cupola
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 94 Norfolk Street – Italianate style with two-and-a-half story tower-like bay topped with a cupola with iron cresting on top; decorative voussoirs and keystones
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Welland Book 1 – 221 Division Street – McCollum-Harcourt House – late 1870s – 2½ story stuccoed house, Italianate style – open verandah supported by wooden columns, double eave brackets, lacy verge board under central peak above a double semi-circular window
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
West Flamborough – Concession 2 – cornice brackets, corner quoins
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 3 – 3203 Peter Street – cornice brackets, decorative window hoods, ornate porch, dormer
Italianate Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 40 Wellington Street South – c. 1874 – Italianate – L shape, two-story, buff brick with decorative quoins, trunked hip roof, large verandah with pediment above steps, Doric columns are supported on wood pedestals and turned balusters

Second Empire Architecture in Ontario – Top 32 Picks

Second Empire Architecture in Ontario

Second Empire, 1860-1880 – The mansard roof is the most noteworthy feature of this style and is evidence of the French origins. Projecting central towers and one or two-story bays can also be present.

Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Aylmer Book 1 – 445 Talbot Street West – mansard roof, iron cresting, window hoods on dormers
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 3 – 257 Bridge Street East, The Phillips-Burrows-Faulknor House – Glanmore National Historic Site – Harriet Phillips inherited this property from George Bleecker, her grandfather. Glanmore reflects the tastes of the well-to-do in late nineteenth century Canada. The grand house, built by local architect Thomas Hanley, was built in 1882-1883 for wealthy banker John Philpot Curran Phillips and his wife Harriet Ann Dougall, the daughter of Belleville’s Judge Benjamin Dougall. It is in the Second Empire style with mansard roof with elaborate cornices and brackets, dormer windows, iron cresting, a built-in gutter system, and multi-colored slate. The 9,000 square foot home cost $7,000 to build in 1883. The impressive suspended walnut staircase cost $62.50.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville – 181 King Street East – Gill House – 1878 additions of roof and wings – mansard roof, dormers, window hoods with keystones, iron cresting around rooftop balcony, central tower, bay windows
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Goderich – 20 Wellington Street South – The “Strachan House” was built by Adam McVicar, builder of the lighthouse, in 1880. A schooner brought 40,000 bricks to Goderich to construct this mansion for Donald Strachan, a prominent businessman. The Second Empire house features a mansard roof of patterned slate, and a tower crowned with iron cresting, and intricately molded window headings.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – Second Empire style – mansard roof, trichromatic tile work, window hoods on dormers, cornice brackets
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fisherville, Nanticoke, Selkirk Book – 27 Erie Street South, Selkirk – James Cooper built this house in 1870. In 1878 he sold it to George Hoover. The frame house has irregular massing and is in the Second Empire style. It has an over-sized horseshoe dormer with barge board and finial, elaborate window molds with pediments. The three-story tower has four dormers in the mansard roof. The Fess family purchased it in 1947.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cornwall – 36 Fourth Street West – St. Columban’s Rectory – Second Empire domestic architecture with mansard roof and detailing; window hood, trim on gable, bay window, cornice brackets; open railing on porch and wraparound verandah
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Eden Mills Book – Grand Central Hotel, Hillsburgh – 1880s – originally it was a carriage works, transformed into a hotel, served as a bank since the early 1900s – Second Empire – mansard roof with dormers, corner quoins, paired cornice brackets
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – 163 Jackson Street West was built for pharmacist/entrepreneur Tristram Bickle c. 1850 – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dichromatic tile work; ionic capitals on pillars, cornice brackets, corner quoins. Bishop T.B. Fuller moved here in 1884. From 1892 to 1932, Southam newspapers owner William Southam lived here. In 1954, Ken Soble launched CHCH TV here.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 3 – Mansard-roofed three-story tower – Frederick William Fearman was the son of a shoemaker who emigrated from England in 1833 with his parents at the age of eight. He started his business with a store selling smoked and salted meats on Hughson Street between King and King William, moved to a MacNab Street North location near the farmers’ market, and eventually expanded to become W. Fearman Packing Company Limited, with a large factory at Rebecca Street and Ferguson Avenue on the Grand Trunk Railway line. The company slaughtered, hung, salted, smoked and canned pork, beef, veal and lamb for shipment around the world. Fearman built his mansion, “Ivey Lodge”, at 90 Stinson Street in 1863. It is three-story, limestone block with a Mansard-roofed tower as its front entrance; it has bay and arched windows, dormers, verge board trim, and a green metal roof.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Jarvis – 45 Talbot Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dormers in roof, single cornice brackets, cornice return on small gables on window dormers
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 1 – 85 King Street East – 1877 – three story Victorian Second Empire style stone mansion – mansard roof, dormers, verandah, bay windows
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 5 – 116 Bagot Street – Second Empire, Mansard roof with dormers and window hoods, second floor balcony, bay windows, cornice brackets, dentil molding, pillared entrance
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville Book 1 – 76 Main Street East – Annabelle’s Tea House and Restaurant – Built in 1859 – Second Empire style – dormers with window hoods in mansard roof, paired cornice brackets. Anna Belle Miriah Brien Evans was Susanne’s grandmother, for whom tea was an essential part of her day. Tea time for her grandma was an institution. At 4 o’clock on a regular basis, she would proceed to the kitchen as if reminded by an internal clock. Susanne would get the small china tea set and set the table by the window in the dining room. There, as the sunlight streamed in, they would sip tea, have a biscuit, or two, and talk about the day. These are childhood memories that Susanne cherishes. In her honor, she created a place for people to spend time together and perhaps create lovely memories of their own. Tea time has a way of making an ordinary day an occasion.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Listowel – 469 Main Street West – Second Empire style, Mansard roof, dormers with window hoods, built of Wallace brick – was once on edge of town and operated as the Last Chance Hotel – last chance for a drink before leaving town
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 213-219 King Street – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers, dichromatic brickwork
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Morrisburg – 31 Lakeshore Drive – Second Empire style – projecting central tower, concave mansard roof, dormers; has eighteen stained glass windows, each with a different color scheme
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara-on-the-Lake Book 1 – 6 Picton Street – The Prince of Wales Hotel established 1864 – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dormers, window hoods, dichromatic brickwork, cornice brackets, second floor balcony
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 16-18 Wellington Street – King House c. 1888 – Second Empire style – large brick house, mansard roof, ornamental ironwork
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orillia – #84 – E.J. McCrohan, Harness Maker c. 1880 – Second Empire style, mansard roof, iron cresting around roof, finials on dormers, second floor balcony, corner quoins
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 1 – Wellington Street – Langevin Block – is an office building facing Parliament Hill. As the home of the Privy Council Office and Office of the Prime Minister, it is the working headquarters of the executive branch of the Canadian government. The building is named after a Father of Confederation and cabinet minister Hector Langevin. Built of sandstone from a New Brunswick quarry between 1884 and 1889 – Second Empire style – Mansard roof, dormers, grotesque sculptures (fantastic or mythical figures used for decorative purposes)
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 3 – 87 Willow Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, tall windows, dormers
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 26 Drummond Street West – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers with window hoods, tower, voussoirs and keystones, turned veranda roof supports with decorative capitals
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Perry – Corner of Water and Queen Streets – In 1840 Peter Perry purchased forty acres in downtown Port Perry and in 1844 he built a frame building which house a store, trading post, and a home for his agent, Chester Draper. Immediately after Perry’s death is 1851, the property was bought by Mason and Phillips who turned it into a hotel. Henry Charles purchased it in 1867. The present yellow building was built after the fire of 1884. The hotel had thirty rooms including a dining room and at the street level were two stores including a sample room where salesmen could display their wares. They named it the St. Charles Hotel after Henry Charles.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 217 Colborne Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dichromatic tile work
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 5 – 15 Welland Avenue – Second Empire – mansard roof with dormers with window hoods, three-story tower, pediment, cornice brackets, voussoirs and keystones
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 1 – 236 Jones Street East – Ercildoune was originally built as a wedding gift to George Carter’s daughter Charlotte when she married Henry Lincoln Rice in 1880. The home is built in the Second Empire style, a very rare style of home in St. Marys.
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stouffville Book 1 – Main Street – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dormers with window hoods
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 299 Dundas Street – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dormers in roof, cornice brackets, two-story tower-like bays
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Wingham – Town Hall A.D. 1890 – Mansard roof, dormers, cornice brackets
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – 126 Graham Street – c. 1860 – Second Empire – symmetrical three-story white brick, mansard roof, dentils, decorative cornice with large brackets, two-story bay windows flank entrance, decorated cut stone lintels, rough faced stone lintels second floor, dormers have decorative wooden frames, large front door is flanked by transom and side lights, an open portico protects the entrance – now Park Place Retirement Centre
Second Empire Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 1 – 359 Downie Street – Second Empire style, mansard roof, window hoods, 2 story bay windows