Kamloops British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 8 Picks

Kamloops British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos

Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
245 St. Paul Street – Stuart Wood School – 1907 – It is a three-story school, with a full-height basement, with a symmetrical facade in the Neo-Classical style. It is clad in red brick, has a broad hip roof, front and rear gabled projections, and parged string courses. The architecture conveys a sense of permanence and order and demonstrates the Romanesque Revival style in its massive masonry construction and round-arched windows. There are arched transoms above the three central windows on the third floor. The Classical Revival is evident in the pedimented portico, classical columns, and arched fanlight window above the central entrance. The large sash windows were characteristic of contemporary school design, arranged to take advantage of natural light and ventilation. It has been in continuous use as a school for over a century.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
603 St. Paul Street – This Classic Box style house built in 1911 was popular at the beginning of the twentieth century. There are numerous examples throughout the older sections of the city. Typically, it has clapboard siding, v board soffits and wood rafter fascia. Because this house has been used for commercial use many of the original windows and doors have been replaced to meet modern building codes.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
619 St. Paul Street – Herbert and Florence Davies House – This home is a classic example of the Craftsman style house in Kamloops. It was built in 1924 during one of the greatest economic boom times in Kamloops’ history. The first owners were Herbert and Florence Davies. Herbert Davies was a contractor, so it is very likely he built this house himself. As a contractor, Herbert was well-known for his work on the city hall addition in 1913, as well as houses at Seventh Avenue and Dominion.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
715 St. Paul Street – This is one of a dozen identical houses built in this block by an English contractor between 1913 -1923. Craftsman in style this house was built in 1913. It has v board soffits, wood rafter fascia, broad weather board siding and wood frame widows. The verandah has four square pillars that is common to this style and the front door is original.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
673 Battle Street – The ‘Ideal’ house was built in 1912 by Edwin and Alice Walkley. Mr. Walkley was the owner of the Small and Dobson Cement Plant in BC Fruitlands on the North Shore. The plant manufactured concrete building blocks which were used to build many basements in Kamloops. Walkley introduced a molded hollow block to Kamloops called ‘ideal’ blocks which he used to build this house and one at 467 St. Paul Street. The hollow shape was meant to replace the need for insulation. In fact, the house was cool in the summer, but too cold in the winter. Each block was hand-made by Walkley in the backyard using several molds with different patterns on the facing. The blocks were sun-dried before being set into place. The overall style of the house is very similar to the wood frame, two story four-square houses of the same era with attic dormer windows found throughout Kamloops.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
48 Battle Street West – a Roy Burris House – Roy Burris was a member of the famous Kamloops medical family. He had this house built in 1911. It is very similar in style and age to 179 Battle Street West and shares many of the same architectural features. Its long, low verandah is typical of the bungalow style developed by the British in India to keep out the hot, piercing rays of the sun. The verandah boasts the square columns with decorative trim and bay windows typical of the era. The original cedar shingle siding on this house was spared the unfortunate ‘modernizing’ stucco facelift that so many houses in the neighborhood fell victim to in the 1940s and 1950s. Cedar siding is a distinguishing characteristic of early Kamloops houses. The windows still have their original glass panes.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
101 Battle Street West – A. Galloway House – When this house was built in 1928, it was considered ultramodern and very forward looking. The red mansard roof, red brick steps, plate glass windows, dormers, window boxes and small front porch with a “Greek porch” roof are all original features. Archibald Galloway owned a pharmacy in Kamloops for many years. He also successfully ran as a City Councillor and was director of many community organizations.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
133 Battle Street West – Frederick E. Young House – When this house was built in 1910, it was surrounded by sweeping property which stretched south and east for several lots. The owner, Frederick Young, was owner and publisher of the Kamloops Standard newspaper. A tennis court, croquet area, gazebo, and a stable located at 76 Nicola Street West were part of the property. The two-story house has an expansive wraparound verandah accessed by a broad flight of stairs, wide leaded glass windows, two circular windows above the front door, sturdy tapered columns, Craftsman style mill work, exposed rafter ends, and an attic dormer.

Kamloops British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Kamloops British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos

Kamloops is a city in south central British Columbia in Canada, located at the confluence of the two branches of the Thompson River near Kamloops Lake.

The first European explorer, David Stuart, arrived in 1811; he was sent out from Fort Astoria, a Pacific Fur Company post; he spent a winter there with the Secwepemc people. He and Alexander Ross established a post there in May 1812, “Fort Cumcloups”.

The rival North West Company established another post, Fort Shuswap, nearby in the same year. The two operations were merged in 1813 when the North West Company officials in the region bought out the operations of the Pacific Fur Company. After the North West Company’s forced merger with the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1821, the post became known commonly as Thompson’s River Post, or Fort Thompson, which over time became known as Fort Kamloops.

After the fur trade arrived in 1812, Kamloops became the crossroads for horse-drawn pack trains. In the years that followed, Kamloops’ reputation as a bristling locality for trade and commerce was greatly broadened by the gold rush of the 1850s, among other things. Following the arrival of the first permanent ranchers was the railway which came through in 1893; Kamloops continued to be the resting stop for the weary travelers. Kamloops has continued to grow since then with cattle ranching, forestry and mining.

The gold rush of the 1860s and the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which reached Kamloops from the West in 1883, brought further growth.

Pulp, plywood, veneer, cement, and a copper mine are industries in Kamloops. The Royal Inland Hospital is the city’s largest employer. Thompson River University serves a student body of 10,000.

Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
7 Seymour Street West – 1909 – Kamloops Court House – local brick and imported granite and slate three-story building in Edwardian Baroque style – slate roof with rolled copper roof ridge, balustrades, parapeted gables, turret, cupola, oriel window, cornerstone quoins and accents, and heraldic arms
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
405 Victoria Street – Plaza Hotel – a five-story Spanish Colonial Revival style built 1927-1928 – metal pantile canopies, top floor outdoor roof patio with open round arches, round arches also at ground level, stucco exterior walls, large timber brackets, top floor corner balconies with French doors with semi-circular transoms; lobby with oak floors. For the official opening, there was a grand banquet and rooftop dancing. The original hotel had fifty-six hotel rooms. Additional rooms were built onto the hotel in 1948 and 1959. The Plaza Hotel hosted a rooftop tea garden that served the Queen tea on one of her trips to Canada.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
205 Victoria Street – Royal Bank – One of the finest bank buildings erected in Kamloops is this brick structure built in 1911\1912. The remains of an elaborate frieze can still be seen along the top edge of the building. The front facade once featured brick columns, arched windows, and striped awnings. The unpaved street was lined with cluster lights and tall trees.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
118 Victoria Street – The Old Bank of Commerce is a two-story Edwardian Baroque building with Kamloops pressed red brick and dressed stone trim built in 1904. It has a symmetrical front facade, granite foundation with raised tuckpointing, cave modillions, engaged pilasters, block quoins, external brick chimney, dentils, over-scale lunettes placed over windows with giant keystones, and a hipped roof.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
377 Victoria Street/220 4th Avenue – Ellis Block – The Godmans built this brick building in 1914. In 1917, the Galloway-Ellis Pharmacy opened on the ground floor. Partner W.O. Ellis bought the building in 1951. His drugstore remained in operation on this site under various owners until 1994.
Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
Kamloops is a city of bridges. During the 1880s the growing community of Kamloops needed a bridge to connect with its most important partner, the Kamloops Tk’emlúps Indian Band on the north shore and the predominately white population in the city. The wooden truss structure measured 300 meters and included a swing span to accommodate paddle wheelers. The official name for the bridge was Government Bridge but it has always been colloquially known as The Red Bridge. The current bridge is the third Red Bridge and was built in 1936. The 1,200-foot (366 meters) bridge required over 300,000 feet of lumber and two pre-fabricated spans that were placed on four piers. Clearance in the center is 35 feet (11 meters) above high water and 54 feet (16 meters) above low water. The location of the bridge is a natural crossing point on the South Thompson River before it joins the North Thompson River. For thousands of years the Tk’emlúps Indian Band of the Secwépemc Nation lived in the area as hunters and gatherers. They were nomadic during the summer relying on salmon from the river, wild game, and nature’s provisions. In the winter they lived in Keekwillie pit houses along the shores of the South Thompson and Thompson rivers. Archaeological evidence of pit houses, burial sites and artifacts remain abundant to the present and can be viewed at the Secwépemc Museum and Heritage Park. The bridge is centrally located and provides views of Mount Paul, Mount Peter and the conjunction of the South Thompson and North Thompson Rivers.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
297 First Avenue – The Inland Cigar Factory is a two-story red brick Victoria era commercial building with a corbelled cornice, arched second floor window openings and a blind arched opening above central entry with rubbed brick outline and herringbone infill.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
475 Lee Road – This Art Deco house built in 1931 features plaster siding, wood trim, arched windows with multi-pane glass and decorative shutters.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
817 Columbia Street – Owen Norris House – Owen Norris settled in Kamloops in 1906. He was elected alderman in 1910 but he argued and clashed with the mayor. When Norris ran for mayor in 1911, he was soundly defeated. Norris left Kamloops the following year shortly after his new house on Columbia street was built, in 1912. Norris died a few short years later in Vancouver, in 1918. This house could be a pre-fabricated house. Variations in the roof line and an ‘eyebrow’ window in the top peak soften the details of what is a Georgian Revival/Vernacular style house. Exposed rafter ends, details on the columns and the multipaned windows point to both the Queen Anne Revival and Craftsman styles.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
716 Columbia Street – Hargraves House – This house was built by C.H. Shutt in 1912 and became the family home of William and Margaret Hargraves in 1916. Margaret was an early Kamloops pioneer who arrived in 1878 while William came to the city in 1892. He had two previous marriages before he married Margaret Currie, a widow, in 1913. William Hargraves was a very adaptable businessman. Starting with a blacksmith and bicycle repair shop he moved into owning a hardware store, the Isis movie theater and then a Ford dealership. He was also an alderman during the 1907 – 1910 period but found politics too frustrating and preferred business ventures. He was a well-known local humorist who dressed up as John Bull, the iconic representation of England, for parades and sang comic songs at his theater when the film broke. The architectural style of this house is known as a Classic box structure that was popular in Kamloops at the beginning of the twentieth century. Original exterior features include multi-pane windows and clapboard siding.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
228 Columbia Street – A California Mission Revival style house built in 1931 using plans that the original owners brought from California. Exterior features include the flat roof with ornate parapet and windows with rounded arch construction.

Hedley to Hope British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 23 Picks

Hedley to Hope British Columbia in Colour Photos

Hope is located at the confluence of the Fraser and Coquihalla Rivers. Hope is at the eastern end of the Fraser Valley, and is at the southern end of the Fraser Canyon.

The history of European settlement in the town of Hope is linked with the history of the Hudson’s Bay Company and the partnership between the company surveyors and First Nations in establishing a brigade trail through the mountains to Fort Kamloops. When gold was discovered in the Fraser Canyon in 1858, miners from across the continent flocked to British Columbia to seek their fortune in the mountains and creeks. Two years later gold was discovered in the Cariboo and miners migrated further north to seek riches in the area around Barkerville. In order to facilitate the movement of miners and supplies north, and gold south, the government built the Cariboo Wagon Road which allowed merchants and prospectors to travel faster and hopefully more safely.

The Fraser River has been the greatest source of food for the Sto-lo people who formed permanent settlements along the river. Simon Fraser came down the river in 1808. Hudson’s Bay forts such as Hope (built in 1848-49) and Yale gave the Sto-lo access to a wider variety of trade goods, such as steel tools, cooking pots, and guns.

Keremeos is located in the beautiful Similkameen Valley in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Keremeos’ main industries are horticulture, agriculture, ranching, and wine making. Soft fruits such as apples, cherries, and peaches as well as vegetables are grown in the dry warm climate.

Princeton lies just east of the Cascade Mountains. The Tulameen and Similkameen Rivers converge here. The area’s main industry has been mining of copper, gold, coal, and some platinum.

Gold was found on Nickel Plate Mountain in 1898 in Hedley. The ore was rich but it had to be extracted from the host rock by crushing and chemical treatment.

Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Wood Carving – Hope, British Columbia
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Service Dog “Chip” was killed in the line of duty near Hope on September 13, 1996 while protecting his partner and friend Constable Doug Lewis.
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
RCMP Service Dog “Chip”
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
The Fraser River – The past saw fur traders, the gold rush of 1858, and early settlers. The present sees waters teeming with migrating salmon and a highway and railways confined to the gorge carved by the river. The Fraser River, beautiful, bountiful, and powerful flows in the pattern of our future.
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
“Standoff” Wood Carving
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Man inside trunk with bear and fish above
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Eagle, wolf, bear carving
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Rotary International carving – man holding fish, and fish on bench
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Carver Pete Ryan 1996
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
681 Fraser Avenue – Christ Church – 1861 – This white clapboard, Gothic Revival-styled Anglican Church with leaded glass windows first ministered to gold rush prospectors.
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
A Labyrinth consists of a single meandering pathway that leads from the entrance to the center and back out again. In the Christian tradition, it is a place where one can experience a spiritual walk with our creator. It provides a time for private meditation, a time to pray and talk to God.
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Two-story house with balconies on both stories
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Gothic two-story home
Architectural Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Queen Anne style with turret and wraparound veranda
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Yellow broom
Photos, Hope, British Columbia
Early January 9, 1965 a huge landslide occurred and destroyed about three kilometers of the Hope-Princeton Highway. The slide, consisting of more than 46 million cubic meters of earth, rock and snow, crashed down in seconds from the 2,000-meter-high mountain ridge.
Architectural Photos, Princeton, British Columbia
Princeton Town Hall
Photos Hedley, British Columbia
Hedley – From the heart of this mountain, men took $47,000,000 in gold. In 1904 Hedley boomed with the opening of the mill in town and the Nickel Plate Mine on the mountaintop. The nearby Hedley Mascot Mine, on a claim of less than an acre, mined a fortune. In 1955 the gold, silver and copper ore were exhausted.
Photos, Hedley, British Columbia
Hedley Trading Post
Photos, Keremeos, British Columbia
Keremeos – village
Photos, Keremeos, British Columbia
Keremeos – mountain
Photos, Keremeos, British Columbia
Keremeos – mountain
Photos, British Columbia
Driving on the highway from Hedley to Hope, British Columbia

Penticton British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 12 Picks

Penticton British Columbia in Colour Photos

Penticton is a city in the Okanagan Valley of the Southern Interior of British Columbia situated between Okanagan and Skaha Lakes.

In 1866, Tom Ellis, the first European settler in Penticton, built his ranch house. Tom and his wife Wilhemina raised their family, planted Penticton’s first fruit trees and established his 30,000-acre cattle ranch. The Penticton Hotel was established in 1892 by Ellis, who positioned it around the local government area, and its first road: Front Street. The sidewalks on the street were made from wood, with coal oil lamps being introduced to the sidewalk.

Four Shatford brothers moved to the Okanagan from Nova Scotia and were influential in the area. W.T. Shatford bought out the Ellis Estate and formed the South Okanagan Land Company in 1905; he became rich. Lytton became a senator when Robert Borden was Prime Minister and the Senator Shatford School was named after him. Large dams were built on the upper reaches of the Ellis and Turnbull Creeks creating a gravity-fed irrigation system needed to develop the area into the “Garden of Eden.”

Horses were instrumental in opening up the interior by carrying goods over the Brigade Trail. Stagecoaches and wagons followed with railways and boats came into use after that. Herds of wild horses roam freely in the hills.

Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
558 Ellis Street – P.D. McDonald House – 1912 – rusticated concrete block house – cross-gabled with exposed beams, symmetrical, four square porch posts with Ionic detailing, broken pediments, paired double-hung windows, central entry, wide overhanging eaves, Dutch style chimney pots
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
570 Martin Street – 1911 – shingle style with a cross-gable form, flared eaves and a prominent pedimented gable; the full front porch has square shingled porch posts; the windows are double hung; the continuous wall covering is of square cut shingles
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
1201 Fairview Road – Art Moderne style – 1940 – flat roof, rounded corners, groupings of windows, smooth stucco surface, coping at the roof line
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
984 Fairview Road – 1922 – 1½ story saddle-notched log house – The Beatons bought it within five years of construction and lived in it for seventy-five years. Bertie Beaton was a member of a pioneer family who arrived in 1906 and ran the Penticton Hotel; her husband worked for the Kettle Valley Railway. It has a deep front porch, wide steps, low-pitched side-gabled roof, rooftop shed dormer, and the fireplace was constructed with cobbles from Shatford Creek.
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
494 Young Street – 1913 – Keyes House – 1½ story Late Victorian cottage with steeply pitched paired gables and a shingled gable truss – The use of a variety of surface materials including shingle and lap siding is typical of Queen Anne Revival architecture. Robert Grey Keyes was a member of City Council.
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
230 Orchard Avenue – 1938 – The Tupper Residence – Art Moderne – smooth stucco finish, curved corners and horizontal bands, flat roofs, curved concrete steps, wraparound multi-paned windows, recessed entrance
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
158 Eckhardt Avenue East – Penticton High School – 1913 – Neo-Georgian style, three brick bays, raised basement, Romanesque central entrance arch with arched windows above, hipped roof, deeply articulated dentil courses, roof-top cupola
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
696 Main Street – Penticton United Church – 1929 – Gothic Revival stone and stucco – square tower, stained glass windows, arched windows and doorways
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
100 Main Street – Penticton Court House – 1949 – Art Deco-Moderne style
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
196 Penticton Avenue – Sutcliffe Residence – 1912 – Queen Anne Revival style
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
220 Manor Park Avenue – Leir House – 1929 – vernacular architecture, stone cladding, dominant entrance porch and stairs – thirteen bedrooms to accommodate the eleven Leir children
Architectural Photos, Penticton, British Columbia
The S.S. Sicamous, a steel-hulled stern wheeler, rests on the southern shores of Okanagan Lake in downtown Penticton. It is 200 feet long and was quite luxurious. From 1914 to 1936 she made daily runs between Penticton and Okanagan Landing at the north end of the lake carrying up to 250 passengers plus mail and freight.

Kelowna British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

Kelowna British Columbia in Colour Photos

The Kelowna town site was laid out in 1892, and by 1898 the community growing on the shores of Okanagan Lake began to show that it would become a permanent settlement. As people came so did the traveling missionaries and students of both the Presbyterian and Methodist churches. Kelowna is the largest community in the Okanagan Valley.

The Okanagan Sunflower is the official floral emblem of Kelowna. It is one of the longest blooming wildflowers, providing abundant splashes of bright yellow on the hillsides in early spring. The plant is drought tolerant; it’s completely edible and was used by the First Nations peoples as a food source. Its large yellow flowers reflect the sunny Okanagan skies and the hot summer climate.

The service industry employs the most people in Kelowna. In summer, boating, swimming, water skiing, windsurfing, fishing, golfing, hiking and biking are popular. In winter both Alpine and Nordic skiing are favorite activities at the nearby ski resorts. Kelowna produces wines that have received international recognition. Vineyards are found around and south of the city where the climate is ideal for the many wineries. Kelowna is the home of Sun-Rype, a popular manufacturer of fruit bars and juices.

Many prominent people played a part in Kelowna becoming the city it is today and many of them made their homes on Marshall Street. The W.J. Marshall family was one of the very early families to settle here and their home is at 1869. R.B. Staples owned the Beaverdell Silver Mine and was also prominent in the fruit industry; their home is at 1812.

Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
781 Bernard Avenue – The David Leckie (successful businessman and civic leader) House was built in 1906 in the late Queen Anne style. A tall gable on the right is balanced by a dormer on the left. There is narrow horizontal wood siding and a semi-circular porch with a balustrade above.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
806 Bernard Avenue – Jessie Willard Hughes House – 1933 – Colonial Revival style – J.W. Hughes planted the first commercial vineyards in 1926 and he exported gladioli and peony bulbs.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
830 Bernard Avenue – James W. Jones (Mayor, Conservative MLA) – 1912 – Queen Anne style, hipped roof with dormer, classic foursquare, wraparound pillared veranda, narrow horizontal wood siding
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
865 Bernard Avenue – James Bacon Knowles (jeweler and watch maker) house built in 1907 – hipped roof, wood frame construction with double-beveled wooden siding, wooden trim and details.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
870 Bernard Avenue – William Hughes-Games house – 1936 – is a Vernacular Cottage with a cross-gabled roof. There is an arched opening to a recessed entry.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
757 Lawrence Avenue – George Arthur Meikel House – 1910 – Dutch Colonial style – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
831 Lawrence Avenue – Howard E. Atchison House – 1931 – Tudor Revival style with half-timber detailing on stucco, gable roof truncated at the peak
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
857 Lawrence Avenue – Dougald McDougall (civil engineer in fruit industry) House – 1922 – California Craftsman Bungalow – gable roof with deep eaves and exposed rafters, deep porch
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
868 Lawrence Avenue – William Harold Hunter McDougall (fruit grower and exporter) House – 1909 – Vernacular Cottage style
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
966 Lawrence Avenue – Munson House – 1911 – Victorian Foursquare with hipped roof, gabled dormer and covered porch – Robert Munson was a sawmill worker.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
987 Lawrence Avenue – Renwick House – 1912 – Queen Anne style – altered from the original – turret, bay window, dormers
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
1001 Lawrence Avenue – Second Knowles House – 1913 – J. B. Knowles was a jeweler and civic leader. Dutch Colonial Revival style – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
228 Lake Avenue – This house was the home of Harold Pettman and his family. Harold and his brother Charles ran Pettman Brothers Grocery until 1966 when Harold became Manager of the Okanagan Federated Shippers. This 1½ story wood frame house was built in 1941 during the wartime. It is in Cape Code style. It has a cross-gabled roof, and a concrete foundation. There is horizontal siding on the first story and vertical siding with polygonal ends on the upper half-story. A small gabled roof supported with brackets covers the front entrance.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
1922 Abbott Street – John Francis Fumerton and Annie Maria brought their family to Kelowna in 1916 where he established a men’s clothing, dry goods and shoe store. This 1½ story wood frame house was built in 1933 on the corner of Abbott and Vimy. With its picturesque roof line and casement windows, this Storybook cottage is a romantic representation of traditional domestic ideals. It has a steeply-pitched cross-gabled roof with gabled projections, its original glazed front door and semi-circular concrete front entrance steps.
Architectural Photos, Kelowna, British Columbia
1858 Abbott Street – 1937 – Moderne style – streamlined, flat parapet roof, stucco and horizontal banding and cladding, multi-sash windows with narrow trim, curved walls, asymmetrical facade, canopy over entrance

Vernon, Chase, Salmon Arm, British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Vernon, Chase, Salmon Arm, British Columbia in Colour Photos

Vernon is a city in the Okanagan region of the southern interior of British Columbia. Named after Forbes George Vernon, a former Member of the Legislative Assemblyof British Columbia who helped found the famed Coldstream Ranch nearby.It is the oldest city in the Okanagan Valley and celebrates its history and heritage with the larger-than-life display of twenty-six murals painted on the walls of its downtown buildings.

The Okanagan people settled around the city’s two lakes, Okanagan Lake and Swan Lake, obtaining seasonal sources of food. Fur traders camped in Vernon as it started to develop in 1863, following a gold discovery at the Cherry Creek, Monashee Mountains, Mission Creek and east side of the Okanagan Lake. Vernon was home to many cattle ranches and fruit orchards.

Vernon expanded after the Canadian Pacific Railway was opened in the Okanagan and Shuswap regions in 1891. The stern-wheeler S.S. Aberdeen was launched by the Canadian Pacific Railway for use on Okanagan Lake in 1893 connecting Vernon to Penticton at the south end of Okanagan Lake, and points between.

Chase is located at the outlet of Little Shuswap Lake which is the source of the South Thompson River. Chase Creek, which drops over three small waterfalls before flowing through the town, enters the South Thompson just below the lake’s outlet. The main industries in Chase are forestry and tourism.

The town was named after a flamboyant character named Whitfield Chase, an American from New York State. After originally coming to Canada during the 1858 gold rush he settled in the area in 1865. He was the first non-native settler that farmed and raised a family, in what was then called, The Shuswap Prairie.

Sorrento is on the south shore of Shuswap Lake, 28 kilometers west of Salmon Arm and 80 kilometers east of Kamloops. You can fish in the lake, enjoy water sports and boating, and view scenic landscapes.

Salmon Arm is located on Shuswap Lake midway between Calgary and Vancouver on the Trans-Canada Highway. It has the longest curved wooden wharf in North America which draws tourists from around the World.

By 1904, Salmon Arm had acquired a reputation for having an excellent fruit harvest. The local businessmen grew fruit as a main export, sending it to the larger, more populated towns that surrounded it.

Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 3302 27th Street – Beairsto Elementary School was known as Central School when it was built in Vernon in 1909. The brick building was three stories high with an auditorium on the third floor. A north wing in stucco was added in 1939 and a south wing was added in 1946. Harold K. Beairsto was principal from 1925 to 1961; when he retired the name of the school was changed to honor him. Beairsto Elementary School is still operating as a school and is the center for Vernon’s elementary French Immersion program. The main entrance is accentuated by a Georgian arch and the Mansard roof is topped by an octagonal cupola and framed by large chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 3001 27th Street – Vernon Law Courts – This second court house for Vernon was designed by T. Hooper and was started in 1910. It was built in the Classical Revival style of local granite from a quarry at Okanagan Landing. The first court case was heard in 1914.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 2203 30th Avenue – This impressive Queen Anne house features and octagonal tower, fish scale shingles, deep eaves and bay windows. The Campbells were long-established furniture dealers.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 2301 32nd Avenue – The steeply pitched Mansard roof of the Mohr House permits full use of the attic. It was built in 1893 for a wood-turner at Smith and Clerin’s Sawmill.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 2003 37th Avenue – C.B. Lefroy, rancher, later notary public and realtor had this home built in 1905. The hip-on-gable roof and highly decorated barge boards in the gable ends create a picturesque cottage-like effect. At one time the house was part of Miss Le Gallais’ School for Girls founded in 1913. Miss Topham-Brown, who came to Vernon in 1917, worked here as housekeeper, cook, games coach and drawing instructor prior to opening her own studio. She was an enthusiast supporter of the arts until her death in 1974.
Chase, British Columbia
Chase – Shuswap Lake
Sorrento, British Columbia
Sorrento – Shuswap Lake taken from Caen Road Community Park
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – Salmar Classic Theatre was built in 1949 using a Quonset design which was developed during World War II. It is circular in shape and constructed of corrugated steel sheets bolted together into a half circle arch form.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 20 Hudson Avenue NE – The old Courthouse, constructed in 1930, is a two-story brick and stucco building with gable dormers and half timbering. It has an arched entryway and portico, decorative eave brackets and carved barge boards.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 20 Hudson Avenue NE – The Municipal Hall is a one-story brick building with a gable roof, gable dormers and a brick chimney.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 70 Hudson Avenue NE – The Post Office, completed in 1937, is a one-story flat-roofed brick building with a raised stepped parapet in an Art Deco style including arched Palladian windows. The Post Office moved to a new location in 1974; the building was used as a library for nearly twenty years and now houses the Shuswap Art Gallery.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 251 5th Street SE – Skeleton House was built in 1912. Bob Skelton was Manager of the Salmon Arm Cooperative Creamery and the city mayor. It has a large gabled roof with lower-sloped “skirts” at the eaves. There are two gable-roofed dormers (one front, one back) each with the same lower-sloped eave details as found on the main gable.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 721 Harris Street – The M.M. Carroll House was built in 1909 and is an excellent example of pre-First-World-War bungalow design. Carroll was a plumber, tin-smith, undertaker and theater owner. It has a gable roof with dormer extensions at the top level; the windows are double hung and have upper lite multi-panes. The front verandah has bevel-sided half walls with cased posts, moldings and curved cased beams.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 720 Harris Street – The Collier House is a 1½ story cross-gabled house in the low Craftsman bungalow style. There are knee braces supporting the gable end eaves.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 680 Harris Street – The Lyman House was built about 1908 in the Dutch Colonial style.
Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – The wharf is one of the iconic features of Salmon Arm.

Osoyoos British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

Osoyoos British Columbia in Colour Photos

The South Okanagan Valley is located at the northernmost tip of the upper Sonoran Desert system which starts in Mexico and extends through North America as the Great Basin. Because of the low rainfall and a very sandy soil, desert plants grow in the region. Osoyoos is surrounded by hills blanketed in sage and pine forest. The valley sides and bottomlands have orchards that produce the earliest fruit in Canada as well as great wines. Early agricultural production in the Okanagan-Similkameen region was focused mainly on cattle ranching as the local environment was well suited to cattle grazing and provided beef to expanding communities.

Ranching in the Okanagan Valley got its start in the 1860s when Osoyoos customs officer Judge John Carmichael Haynes levied duties on the herds of cattle that were being driven from the United States to the Cariboo gold fields. Many of the cattle drovers could not afford to pay these duties, and thus paid Haynes with cattle. Haynes kept some of the cattle for himself, and sold some to other early settlers.

Until the construction of the Kettle Valley Railroad in 1915, the cattle had to be herded over the treacherous mountain trails in order to reach the markets. Once the K.V.R. was constructed, the cattle had only to be driven to Penticton, where they were loaded into boxcars and shipped to the meat processing plants in Vancouver. The ranching process was facilitated further in 1943, with the establishment of the first stockyard in Okanagan Falls.

Osoyoos means “a place where two lakes come together.” In 1811 the first white men in their search for furs came here and established a fur trading post. Cattle ranching, mining and lumbering followed. In 1907 the first commercial fruit orchard was planted because it was the warmest place in Canada. The community nestles along Lake Osoyoos which is twelve miles long and at an elevation of only 912 feet above sea level.

With its orchard setting, lakes and mountains, the likeness to the county of Spain is apparent. This sparked the community to adopt a Spanish theme.

The Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre celebrates the precious cultural heritage of the Osoyoos Indian Band and explores their desert landscapes. The site is fifty acres of sage grasslands and ponderosa pine forest. The name NK’MIP (Inkameep) means “gateway or doorway to the bottom of the lake system.” The Inkameep lived off the land, lakes and rivers. They hunted, fished and grew crops and gave thanks to the ‘Great Spirit’ for the seasons and the bounty they shared. The Osoyoos Indian Band was a trading nation and developed trade with bands farther north in the Okanagan Valley and the Colville Band in Washington.

Nk’Mip Cellars became a reality under the leadership and vision of Chief Clarence Louie. His tenacity as an entrepreneur is upheld by his passion for his people and their place within the Canadian economy. Sam Baptiste, General Manager of Inkameep Vineyards is recognized as one of the best wine growers in this British Columbia region.

Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
A kinetic sculpture pays homage to the Okanagan First Nation of the area
Architectural Photos, Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Mountain Sheep
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Wolf howling, bear below
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Soopalallie (also called soap berries) are berries gathered from May to July and whipped with water into “Indian ice cream”, a pinkish-white froth resembling beaten egg whites. Jinxed people drank a brew of soopalallie and wild raspberries to change their luck.
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Antelope Brush is a member of the rose family. The Okanagan People used this plant as a detoxifying cleanser. The branches were used to make hot fires during winter camping trips. The shrub is an important browse plant for deer and bighorn sheep. Chipmunks, ground squirrels and mice eat its seeds.
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Harry in front of the Ponderosa Pine
Osoyoos, British Columbia
The desert was in bloom for us – not too hot when we were there. Long Leaved Phlox – Growing among the sagebrush, phlox is the longest blooming native spring flower. The showy pink to white flowers appear in April and last through mid-June. The Okanagan People used this plant for treating anemia in children.
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Spotted Lake is located on Highway 3 and is sacred to the Okanagan First Nations People. The peculiar blue, green and yellow spots on the surface of the lake are formed from high concentrations of minerals and salt as the water level evaporates and drops.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 9 – My Top 7 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 9

Lockport is a small community in Manitoba located twenty-eight kilometers north of the city of Winnipeg. The community is a part of both the Rural Municipalities of St. Andrews (west of the river), and St. Clements (east of the river). Lockport is an ancient settlement, predating European history by thousands of years. It is one of the oldest known settlements in Canada. Flocks of the North American White Pelican are often seen.

The Red River Floodway joins the Red River just north of the dam. The bridge and locks at Lockport (completed in 1910), submerged the St. Andrews Rapids (a natural obstruction to the south) in order to make the Red River navigable through to Lake Winnipeg.

We enjoyed lunch at the Half Moon Restaurant.

South along River Road is St Andrews Church and Rectory. The Church is the oldest operating church in Western Canada. Kennedy House, also located on River Road, was built by Captain William Kennedy in 1866.

Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
3 St. Andrews Road – Parish Church of St. Andrew – established 1828 – The church was built in 1844-49 in the Gothic Revival style. The walls were constructed from local limestone from the river bank. St. Andrew’s Church is the oldest church in continuous use in Western Canada.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
River Road – The Kennedy House – Eleanor called it “Maple Grove” – cobblestone house built in 1866 with large windows, French doors, and modified Gothic gables. Eleanor and William lived here with their children William and Mary. William farmed and kept a trading store on the adjacent north lot. The Kennedy House, in the Rural Municipality of St. Andrews, was built in 1866 for Captain William Kennedy using stones quarried from the Red River banks at nearby St. Andrews Rapids. The Gothic Revival style of the Kennedy House is architecturally distinctive, compared to the other old stone houses built in the Red River Settlement, which reflect Georgian influences. By contemporary Eastern Canadian or British standards Kennedy House was simple and unadorned. By Red River Settlement standards, however, it was very fashionable. William Kennedy (1814-1890) was an Arctic explorer, missionary, and a Hudson’s Bay Company employee. He was born at Cumberland House on the Saskatchewan River in April 1814, the son of Alexander Kennedy, a Hudson’s Bay Company Chief Factor, and an aboriginal woman, Agathas Margaret (Mary) Bear. When he was thirteen, he was sent to Orkney for his education. In 1836 he entered the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company and was stationed on the Ungava Coast. He left the Company’s service in 1848 and went to Canada West where he engaged in his own business, and began to lobby for the expansion of Canada into the north-west. As a lad at Cumberland House he had met Sir John Franklin, and in 1850 he offered his services to Lady Franklin to help in the search for the Franklin expedition. He commanded two of the Franklin search expeditions and discovered the Arctic passage known as Bellot Strait. He was the first to use dogs and sleds from an exploring ship. In 1853, he presented a paper on these adventures to the Royal Geographical Society in London, England, and wrote a book entitled A Short Narrative of the Second Voyage of The Prince Albert in search of Sir John Franklin. In 1856, with George Brown’s support, he resumed his efforts to link the Red River Settlement and Canada West by a northern route. About 1860 he settled at Fairford, on Lake Manitoba, as an Anglican missionary and teacher to the Indians. In 1861 he settled at St. Andrew’s on the Red, where he was for a time employed by the Hudson’s Bay Company as a storekeeper at Lower Fort Garry. He was an early advocate of a railway to Hudson’s Bay. About 1859, he married Eleanor E. Cripps and they had two children. Crippled by rheumatism for most of his remaining years he lived a very retired life at St. Andrew’s. He died at his home on January 25, 1890.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
St. Andrews Lock and Dam
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
Half Moon Restaurant Mural
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
St. Nicholas Ukrainian Orthodox Church at Gonor – The history of the St. Nicholas Parish begins in the year 1896-1897 when immigrants from Bukowina, Ukraine settled in the Gonor district. The Gonor district was already established by a Jesuit Missionary, called Father de Gonnor, who through his efforts, assisted la Verendrye, the explorer, and some years later, the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1877. As the Ukrainian settlers emigrated to Canada, one of the terminal depots was in East Selkirk, and from this point they traveled and walked to settle along the bank of the Red River in the Gonor district. Faith, physical strength, and hope, were their assets, and the church and religion were very important in the lives of these early pioneers. They desired a church building where they could open up their hearts to God. These early settlers made plans for the construction of the first church in 1904. The church and belfry were made of logs, which were brought in from the area. In April 1944, both the original church building and manse were destroyed by an accidental grass fire. The original belfry containing the bell from Bukowina was saved and is still in use today. The present church is about 1,100 square feet in area, is built of lumber and it is in the form of Byzantine architecture. Mr. Anton Prychun, a resident of Tyndall, Manitoba, was the master builder. All labor, with the exception of the head carpenter and painter, was provided free of charge. The church was painted and decorated in the following manner: The ceiling has sky-blue oil paint spangled with white stars. The dome has cherubim angels on and between clouds on a sky-blue background. The altar is painted in a similar manner. The walls are a cream color and a border is stenciled in a Ukrainian motif throughout the church. The Ikonastos consists of the picture of Jesus crucified at Golgotha, the Last Supper, and the twelve apostles and is painted and decorated in the Eastern Ukrainian Greek Orthodox style.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
6297 Henderson Highway – Ukrainian Parish of Catholic Holy Trinity, St. Clements – 1952 – Around 1890, a large influx of Ukrainian settlers was emigrating to Canada which led to the establishment of Ukrainian Catholic parishes. The first Holy Trinity Ukrainian Catholic Church was started in 1899, in the traditional Byzantine, rite style, in the form of a cross. The current church of brick and stucco structure, with its two radiant stainless-steel domes, which could be seen from miles around, was built 1952-1953.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
5635 Henderson Highway – St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Narol was founded in 1911 by immigrants from the Brody area in Galicia. Like most Rusins/Western Ukrainians, these pioneers had been Greek Catholic in their homeland, which at that time belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Upon their arrival in Canada, the people reunited with the Orthodox Church of their forebears, becoming a part of the Russian Orthodox Mission.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 8 – My Top 9 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 8

The Forks in Winnipeg has been a meeting place for over 6,000 years. Nestled in the heart of downtown, The Forks is one of Winnipeg’s most beloved places, at the junction of the Assiniboine and mighty Red Rivers. Early Aboriginal people traded at The Forks, followed by European fur traders, Métis buffalo hunters, Scottish settlers, riverboat workers, railway pioneers and tens of thousands of immigrants. The Forks’ unique history is apparent in its bustling market. Originally two adjacent stables for competing rail companies circa early 1900, the horse stalls were joined together by a courtyard and bridges to create The Forks Market.

The Forks Market offers a multitude of shops to browse for a wide variety of specialty items and souvenirs. Downstairs, The Market features a fresh food emporium with everything from gourmet cheeses to meats, organic baked goods and wine. Upstairs, in the Market Loft, shoppers will find items ranging from cigars and aromatherapy products to crafts and artworks from three hundred local and Canadian artisans. A constantly changing array of artisans and vendors also sell their wares at day tables inside The Forks Market and outside on The Plaza.

Across the courtyard from the Forks Market is the four-story Johnston Terminal building. Originally constructed in 1930, the terminal was a warehouse and freight-forwarding facility. After a substantial addition in 1930, the warehouse was at the time one of the largest in Winnipeg. It was occupied by National Storage and Cartage until 1961, and was leased to the Johnston National Cartage Company for the next fifteen years. Vacated in 1977, the building was unoccupied until the redevelopment of the site into The Forks.

The building is now home to a variety of specialty boutiques and stores, offices, a café, Finn McCue’s and The Old Spaghetti Factory. The basement of the building hosts the Johnston Terminal Antique Mall, which features over thirty consignees and new merchandise brought in daily.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
241 Yale Avenue
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
288 Yale Avenue – dormers, pediment, bay window
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
283 Yale Avenue – English Manor house – Jacobean gable
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
37 Kingsway – Neo-colonial – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
29 Ruskin Row – The house, built for businessman Robert Ross Scott, is a grand brick and wood-frame structure built in 1914 in Crescentwood, one of Winnipeg’s early affluent neighborhoods. It is a fine interpretation of a Tudor Revival-style residence. Designed by John N. Semmens, the large dwelling is distinguished by several characteristics of the style, including a steeply pitched roof line with cross gables and dormers, massive chimneys, masonry and stuccoed walls with decorative half-timbering and multi-paned windows including sash, casement, oriel and bay windows in wood frames. The 2½-storey house has an off-center front entrance porch topped by a balcony. The load-bearing brick base is finished in red-brown brick with header detailing. Other details include barge boards and wood finials on the gable ends, stone lug sills, pilaster strips and detailed brickwork around the front entrance.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
2 Ruskin Row – corner quoins, pediment above door
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Palk Road – balustrade

Near the convergence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers is a natural shallow amphitheater known as the Oodena Celebration Circle. It pays homage to the 6,000 years of Aboriginal peoples in the area. Oodena, Ojibew for “heart of the community”, features ethereal sculptures, a sundial, interpretive signage, a naked eye observatory and a ceremonial fire pit, making it a desirable venue for cultural celebrations or a place to simply sit and marvel at its beauty. Oodena was inspired by the myths and sacred places of the many people drawn to The Forks over its 7,000-year history. It is interpreted as an opportunity to restore contact with the cultural history of the site and the dynamic forces of earth, water and sky. Surrounding the bowl, cobblestone formations support sculptural sighting armatures that act as guideposts for celestial orientation.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Sun Stone – The sun was central to Aztec culture in Mexico. The sun god is in the center with the order of the cosmos weaving Aztec concepts of time, space, politics and the sacred.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
The vision of Antoine Predock, an architect from Albuquerque, New Mexico for the Canadian Museum of Human Rights is a journey beginning with a descent into the earth where visitors enter the building through the “roots” of the museum, through the Great Hall, then a series of vast spaces and ramps, before culminating in the Tower of Hope, a tall spire protruding from the top that provides visitors with views of downtown Winnipeg. Its purpose is to promote respect for others.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 7 – My Top 19 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 7

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
251 Furby Street – Mayor’s Mansion – two-story bay window
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
147 East Gate was built in 1882 for Arthur F. Eden, land commissioner for the Manitoba and Northern Railway and later a partner of Stobart Wholesale Merchants. Some people are of the opinion that this house was originally the home of James Armstrong, though others believe that Armstrong resided on the point only as a squatter. The front door faces the River as the original drive circled to that side of the house. The Bird Cage Tennis Club occupied seven acres here between East Gate and Middle Gate. In 1891, the house was purchased by William Fisher of Happyland Amusement Park. Mr. Fisher called this house Elmsley. The fireplace in the living room is faced with blue Minton tiles telling the story of the Knights of the Round Table and the sword Excalibur. The house was owned by the Dr. Bruce Chown family. Fisher divided his property into three lots and sold them. The southern portion, the red brick house, became the Tupper property. W. J. Tupper lived there until he became Lieutenant Governor.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
100 East Gate – Georgian – engaged columns, open pediment, sidelights and transom
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
90 East Gate – Gothic Revival with Tudor accents on gables, dormer, entrance with parapet above, sidelights – It was built in 1909 by R. T. Riley who lived here until he built 186 Westgate in 1920. The house then passed to C. S. Riley, his son. The walls are eighteen inches thick. One mantel has scenes from the Lord’s Prayer.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
89 East Gate –English Manor house – Jacobean gables, dormers with window hoods – built for George Crowe, a Winnipeg alderman in 1911. The home has ten fireplaces, nine bathrooms, a ballroom in the basement and a vault under the front entrance hall.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
69 East Gate – Tudor – built in 1896 by James Rawlinson Waghorn, the publisher of Waghorn’s Pocket Guide, a stockbroker and financial agent. He was secretary of the Birdcage Tennis Club (in Armstrong’s Point) and co-founder of the St. Charles Country Club. He called his home Maple Grove and it became a social center. The dining room seated fifty people in comfort. In 1905 the touring Shakespearean Company, the Ben Greet Players, performed “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” on the grassy knoll in the yard. Dame Sybil Thorndyke was a cast member, on her first tour. The second owner, Dan Bain, was a noted sportsman. Team Captain of the Winnipeg Victorias hockey team that twice won the Stanley Cup, he also placed second in the 1930 Canadian Figure Skating Championships in the waltz contest at the age of 56.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
51 East Gate – cobblestone, two-story frontispiece, hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
40 East Gate – hipped roof with dormer and tall chimney
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
39 East Gate – Queen Anne style – three-story tower, dormers, voussoirs and keystones, gambrel roof at one end
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
5 East Gate – Greek Revival – two-story pillars, two-story verandas – built in 1906 by Thomas Ryan, of Ryan’s Boots and Shoes. He was the mayor of Winnipeg while in his thirties.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
6 Middle Gate – Henry Linnell, architect, designed this home which was constructed at a cost of $24,000 for John T. Speirs, President of Speirs Parnell Baking Company, now part of Weston’s
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
22 Middle Gate – three-story tower, dormer, second floor balcony with Doric pillars supporting it
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
64 Middle Gate – Neo-colonial – dormers, voussoirs and keystones, sidelights
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
123 Middle Gate – decorative gables, wraparound enclosed veranda – built in 1891 for Frederick William Stobart, wholesale dry goods merchant
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
137 West Gate – Greek Revival – two-story pillars with Ionic capitals, dormer with Doric pillars, dentil molding – built in 1904 by William Wallace Blair – Blair called it ‘Kenilworth’
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
134 West Gate – Queen Anne style – gables with fish scale patterning, tall chimneys, dormers, cornice brackets, second floor balcony with turned spindle balustrade, bay windows, pediment above porch – J. B. Monk, Manager of Bank of Ottawa, built it in 1898. It was Japanese Consulate until 1976.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
119 West Gate – Italianate – hipped roof with dormers and window hoods, tall chimney, balcony above Ionic pillars, bay window – owned at one time by Sidney T. Smith of Smith and Murphy, Grain Merchants
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
112 West Gate – Dunedin – built in 1906 by William Harvey, trust company executive. It was designed by J.H.G. Russell. It was owned in the 1950s by Rupert Whitehead, well known for his accomplishments as a figure skater with the Winnipeg Ice Club.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
54 West Gate – The Ralph Connor House, a three-story brick Jacobethan Revival mansion built in 1913-14, sits on a well-groomed lot overlooking the Assiniboine River. It is noted for its complex roof structure, and warm red-brown brick facades contrasted by limestone dressings on a high stone foundation. Designed by architect G.W. Northwood, the mansion was first associated with Charles William Gordon, a minister at St. Stephen’s Presbyterian Church, a social reformer and best-selling author of international renown. As ‘Ralph Connor’, he penned 25 popular novels known for their moralistic, action-oriented plots of good versus evil and for their portrayals of early life in Ontario and the West. The most popular works were incorporated into Manitoba school reading programs in the 1940s, and three were made into silent movies. Gordon maintained a Winnipeg ministry, served as a military chaplain during World War I, was moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Canada during the formation of the United Church of Canada in 1925, and was involved in the League of Nations. The house has retained a high degree of physical integrity due to its successor occupant, the University Women’s Club of Winnipeg, a pioneering organization that has long promoted the advancement of women in the community and has diligently conserved the Ralph Connor House since 1939. The asymmetrical structure has a complex roof featuring steeply pitched cross-gable and hipped sections, wall dormers and one smaller gable and two shed dormers. The large rectangular windows have decorative limestone surrounds, lintels and mullions, some featuring six-pane top lights; there are also three dominant bay windows and a large stacked bank on the south elevation with rows of four windows separated by limestone medallions. The exquisite details and materials include stacked chimneys, cedar shingles, limestone coping and accents throughout, bracketed eaves, and label moldings.