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Windsor, Ontario – My Top 13 Picks

Windsor, Ontario – My Top 13 Picks

Windsor is the southernmost city in Canada. The Detroit River is to the north of the city, which separates it from Detroit, Michigan. Windsor was settled by the French in 1749 as an agricultural settlement. In 1794, after the American Revolution, the settlement of “Sandwich” was founded. It was later renamed Windsor, after the town in Berkshire, England.

Sandwich, Ford City and Walkerville were separate towns until 1935 when they were annexed by Windsor. They remain as historic neighborhoods of Windsor. Walkerville was incorporated as a town in 1890.

The former Town of Walkerville was founded by Hiram Walker in 1858. The New England-born distiller bought two French farms on the south shore of the Detroit River, and the growth of his industry and the town it supported continued for seven decade under his family’s guidance.

Railroads played an important part in Walkerville’s history. First, the Great Western’s extension to Windsor in 1854 opened up opportunities for commercial expansion. Then Walker built his own line in 1885 with government financing, the Lake Erie Essex & Detroit River Railroad, which connected Walkerville with lake shore towns and farms, and extended as far as St. Thomas. The availability of rail transportation attracted other industrial enterprises to the area, and brought great prosperity to the Walker family and their town.

The Walkerville Land & Building Company was incorporated in 1890 with Hiram’s oldest son, Edward Chandler, as president. The Town passed a by-law in 1894 to provide temporary tax exemptions to attract new industries, and to encourage individuals wishing to build homes in Walkerville. Rental properties for the distillery’s employees were built. All of the community’s amenities were provided by Walker – a fire brigade and police, streetlights, sewers, paved roads and sidewalks, parks, a music hall, a school, library and church.

Walker Road’s east side was devoted to industrial manufacturing facilities. Its western edge had modest, brick, semidetached houses; Monmouth Road’s semis and terraces replaced rows of cottages, and employees were originally required to rent from the distillery. Argyle Road had a mix of terraces and vernacular houses for a higher rank of employee. Devonshire Road became the main street, with Romanesque Revival semis for management and the clergy. Later, distinctive houses of various architectural styles, popular in the protracted Edwardian Period (1900 to the 1930s), rose on the street, and spilled over onto Kildare Road. The concept was fully realized with the landscaped “island” developed as the site of St. Mary’s Anglican Church – the sons’ memorial to their parents, and the erection of Willistead Manor on the former Country Club and park lands.

The Arts and Crafts Movement, a philosophy of design founded in England about 1850, emphasized handmade architecture in an age when factory mass-production was taking hold. Every home Albert Kahn designed shows Arts and Crafts influence. Kahn believed that historic period styles were best suited to homes and public institutions, while factories should be utilitarian, brightly illuminated and devoid of ornament.

Hiram Walker was born in East Douglas, Massachusetts, and moved to Detroit in 1838.  In 1847 at the age of 30, he married Mary Abigail Williams and they had 7 children, two daughters, Julia Elizabeth and Jennie Melissa, and five sons, Willis Ephraim, Edward Chandler, Franklin Hiram, Alfred (infant), and James Harrington. Edward Chandler, his second son, commissioned the development of Willistead Manor.

He was an American entrepreneur and he purchased 460 acres of land across the Detroit River in the town of Sandwich, near Windsor, Ontario, Canada.  In 1858 the flour mill and distillery were completed. The flour produced in his mill benefited the County of Essex’s farming community with farmers from all around using the mill.

Mid-summer in 1858 marked the opening of Hiram Walker’s whisky operation. The same process which he had used in Detroit was now used in Windsor to distill his alcohol. Spirits were leached through charcoal, a process widely used at the time.  Walker began selling his whisky as Hiram Walker’s Club Whisky and it became very popular.  His Canadian industries quickly took precedent over that of his grain business still located in Detroit. As a result, Hiram Walker traveled by ferry to Canada from his home in Detroit on a daily basis. The trip was a lengthy process as the ferry that brought him to Canada dropped him off in Windsor, which left a long ride by horse and buggy to his flour mill and distillery. Throughout his life, Hiram Walker remained an American citizen but in March 1859 Hiram Walker moved to Canada in order to save time traveling to and from his Canadian businesses.

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

350 Devonshire Road – Walkerville Town Hall – 1904 – Classical Revival – symmetrical, belt courses (a continuous row of stones set in the wall), angled quoins, burst pediment above door with coat of arms, dormers, cupola – Windsor Book 1

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

546-548 Devonshire Road built 1890 – Bed & Breakfast – 1889 – Romanesque style arched entrances – Book 1

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

841 Kildare Road – Miers-Fraser House built this house in 1904 – Edwardian, Palladian window, two-storey bay, Ionic columns supporting a pediment – Book 1

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

1899 Niagara Street – Willistead Manor – 1906 – 16th-century Tudor-Jacobean style of an English manor house was commissioned by Edward Chandler Walker, the second son of Hiram Walker. It has 36-rooms but contained only one bedroom. Edward and his wife never had any children, and the coach houses provided ample room for guests. The exterior of gray limestone, quarried in Amherstburg, was hand-cut at the Willistead work site by Scottish stonemasons specifically imported for the project. Tudoresque half-timbering – Book 1

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

2100 Richmond Street – Walkerville Collegiate – 1922 – Classical Revival style – Book 1

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

706 Victoria Avenue – Neo-Classical style, symmetrical façade with a prominent columned entry porch sheltering the fanlight and sidelights of the paneled door;
dentiled eaves, dormers in attic – Windsor Book 2

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

719 Victoria Avenue – Treble-Large House – 1895 – Queen Anne Revival style – Book 2

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

942 Victoria Avenue – Georgian with eyebrow window in roof, pillared entrance with rounded pediment

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

2072 Riverside Drive East – Hiram Walker main office building – view from street – 1894 – Florentine Renaissance – Windsor Book 3

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

2072 Riverside Drive East – Hiram Walker main office building, view from water -1894 – Florentine Renaissance – Book 3– symmetrical, belt courses (a continuous row of stones set in the wall), angled quoins, burst pediment above door with coat of arms, dormers, cupola – Book 3

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

2879 Riverside Drive East – Our Lady of the Rosary Church – built 1907-1913 – Romanesque-style brick and stone building could hold about 1,000 people, features two domed bell towers – Book 3

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

3203 Peter Street – Book 3

Architectural Photos, Windsor, Ontario

3277 Sandwich Street – Mackenzie Hall – District Court House and Gaol – when–the British withdrew from Detroit in 1796 they transferred the courts of the Western District to Sandwich (Windsor) – this building constructed in 1856 in Renaissance Revival style; a facade broken with pilasters which give strong vertical lines; the main entrance has side lights and a fanlight; it is constructed of Anderdon limestone and Ohio sandstone. The carving above the main doorway represents the seal of the Western District of Upper Canada. – Book 3

Waterford, Ontario – My Top 8 Picks

Waterford, Ontario – My Top 8 Picks

Waterford is located on Pleasant Ridge Road, or old Highway 24 in Norfolk County, south of Brantford, north of Simcoe and southwest of Ohsweken.  Waterford was established in 1794 with saw and grist mills on Nanticoke Creek. An early major industry was the agricultural implement factory built by James Green, a local merchant. The area surrounding the town is primarily agricultural land with tomatoes, tobacco and corn among the main crops.  With the decline of the tobacco industry, area farmers have suffered, but ginseng is being grown on some farms. In 1979 a freak tornado swept through the town, knocked down trees, and damaged houses and public property.

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

Italianate, hipped roof, dormer, second floor balcony

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

92 Main Street – Italianate, belvedere on roof, paired cornice brackets, verge board and finial on gables, second floor balcony, Doric columns

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

163 Main Street – Vernacular – three storey tower

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

173 Main Street – two-storey tower-like bay capped with barge board trim on gable

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

Italianate – Doric pillars

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

160 Main Street – Second Empire style, mansard roof, dormers

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

Queen Anne – 3½ storey tower

Architectural Photos, Waterford, Ontario

Georgian – six-over-six windows, Doric pillars, widow’s walk on rooftop, sidelights and transom window around door

Collingwood, Ontario – My Top 9 Picks

Collingwood, Ontario – My Top 9 Picks

Collingwood is situated on Nottawasaga Bay at the southern point of Georgian Bay. Collingwood offers a combination of old time charm and history with recreation opportunities for skiing on Blue Mountain, and golfing.

Collingwood was incorporated as a town in 1858, nine years before Confederation and was named after Admiral Lord Cuthbert Collingwood, Lord Nelson’s second in command at the Battle of Trafalgar, who assumed command of the British fleet after Nelson’s death.

The land in the area was originally inhabited by the Iroquoian Petun nation, which built a string of villages in the vicinity of the nearby Niagara Escarpment. They were driven from the region by the Iroquois in 1650. European settlers and freed black slaves arrived in the area in the 1840s, bringing with them their religion and culture.

In 1855, the Ontario, Simcoe & Huron (later called The Northern) railway came into Collingwood, and the harbor became the place for shipment of goods destined for the upper Great Lakes ports of Chicago and Port Arthur-Ft. William (now Thunder Bay). Shipping produced a need for ship repairs, so it was not long before an organized ship building business was created. On May 24, 1883, the Collingwood Shipyards, formerly known as Collingwood Dry Dock Shipbuilding and Foundry Company Limited, opened with a special ceremony. On September 12, 1901, the Huronic was launched in Collingwood, the first steel-hulled ship launched in Canada. The shipyards produced Lakers and during World War II contributed to the production of Corvettes for the Royal Canadian Navy. Shipbuilding was one of the principal industries in the town, employing as much as 10% of the total labor force. Overseas competition and overcapacity in shipbuilding in Canada led to the demise of shipbuilding in Collingwood in September 1986.

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

296 Pine Street – Italianate style – red brick with buff colored accents

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

One storey wing of 296 Pine Street with fiddler on the roof – The first date Harry and I went on was to see “Fiddler on the Roof”

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

200 Oak Street – This 10,380 square foot Victorian home, the largest and tallest in Collingwood, at the corner of Oak and Third Streets was originally owned by Frank F. Telfer, a leading businessman and ex-mayor of Collingwood. He purchased the property in 1891, and by 1893 the local firm Bryan Brothers Manufacturing Company completed the construction of the Telfer home. In 1925 the Telfer family sold the house, and the “Gowans Home for Missionaries’ Children” was established by the Interior Sudan Mission.
This home displays a variety of architectural features. The three storey structure is of double brick construction laid in a stretcher bond fashion and rests on a cut stone foundation. The three main exterior walls are accented by a repeating Greek style pattern running the full width of the walls below the eaves. The northeast corner of the building is formed by a large round turret with a conical roof. There are eighty windows of various shapes set above limestone sills; they include round, oriel, semicircular, and oval as well as stained glass.

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

242 Third Street – This 2½ storey brick home was built for Charles Pitt, owner of the Bertram Lumber Company. John Wilson was the local Collingwood architect. The house was built in 1908 and is a Georgian influenced Neo-Classical home. A large pediment and column portico adorns the front façade. A balcony protrudes from the second floor within the pediment which has an elliptical window. Brick alternating radiating voussoirs adorn the window and door surround heads on the façade.

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

199 Third Street – Built in the Italianate tradition for the Toner family, early coal and lumber merchants, this home has retained its elegance with minor alterations since 1882. The interior of the home features a circular staircase, marble fireplaces, plaster medallions and a built in buffet.
The exterior brick work laid in the common bond tradition is highlighted by protruding quoins and plinth in lighter contrasting brick. Decorative brick work adorns the original chimney as well as highlighting the window openings. Brick arch work and keystones decorate the window surrounds in a unique three-tiered stepped arch design. The main front façade contains unique, French doors with recessed mullion and molded panels.
The home has a heavily bracketed low hip roof with an east side gable featuring a combination of corniced boxed brackets.

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

185 Third Street – elaborate verge board trim – Gothic Revival style – dichromatic brick work banding and window voussoirs

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

#125 – Neo-Colonial style – gambrel roof

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

203 Pine Street – Italianate style – triangular pediment with decorated tympanum, lighter coloured window hoods, double cornice brackets, frontispiece supported by pillars

Architectural Photos, Collingwood, Ontario

242 Pine Street – Italianate with Gothic style frontispiece, verge board and finial, dichromatic brickwork

Toronto, Ontario – My Top 7 Picks

Toronto, Ontario – My Top 7 Picks

Toronto, the largest city in Canada, the provincial capital of Ontario, is located in Southern Ontario on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. During the American Revolutionary War, United Empire Loyalists fled from the United States to live on lands north of Lake Ontario. In 1787, the British Crown purchased more than a quarter million acres of land from the Mississaugas of the New Credit, and established a settlement called the Town of York. Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe designated York as the capital of Upper Canada. Fort York was constructed at the entrance of the town’s natural harbor where it was sheltered by a long sand-bar peninsula. The town was captured and ransacked by American soldiers in the Battle of York during the War of 1812, and the parliament buildings were set on fire.

In 1834, York became a city and the name was changed to Toronto. In the 19th century, long-distance railway lines were constructed, including a route linking with the Upper Great Lakes. The Grand Trunk Railway and the Northern Railway of Canada joined in the building of the first Union Station. The railway brought more immigrants, and commerce and industry increased. Horse-drawn streetcars were replaced by electric ones in 1891. The great fire of 1904 destroyed a large section of downtown Toronto but the city was soon rebuilt with more stringent fire safety laws and the expansion of the fire department.

In 1954, the City of Toronto and twelve surrounding municipalities joined together into a regional government known as Metropolitan Toronto. The postwar boom resulted in rapid suburban development, and the metropolitan government began to manage services that crossed municipal boundaries, including highways, police services, water and public transit. In that year, disaster struck the city when Hurricane Hazel brought high winds and flash flooding causing the deaths of 81 people in the Toronto area, and leaving about 1,900 families homeless.

Toronto covers an area of 630 square kilometers stretching 21 kilometers (13 miles) from north to south and 43 kilometers (27 miles) east to west. The waterfront shoreline is 46 kilometers (29 miles) long. The Toronto Islands and Port Lands extend out into the lake. The city’s borders are formed by Lake Ontario to the south, Etobicoke Creek and Highway 427 to the west, Steeles Avenue to the north and the Rouge River and the Scarborough-Pickering Townline to the east. Today the city has a population of 2.6 million people.

The city is intersected by three rivers and many tributaries: the Humber River in the west end and the Don River east of downtown, and the Rouge River at the city’s eastern limits. The many creeks and rivers created large tracts of densely forested ravines, and provided sites for parks and recreational trails.

Toronto is a city of high-rises with 1,800 buildings over 30 meters (98 feet), most of them are residential having been built in the 1950s, while the central business district contains commercial office towers.

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

Queen’s Park – In 1859 the city leased land from King’s College and in 1860 a park named after Queen Victoria was opened by the Prince of Wales. The main block of the massive Romanesque Revival Parliament Buildings with its towering legislative block was completed in 1892.

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

King’s College, the first university in this province was chartered in 1827 but it wasn’t until 1843 that classes began in the former Parliament Buildings on Front Street. Construction was completed in 1845. King’s College offered instruction in the arts, science, law, theology and medicine. In 1850 it became the new University of Toronto.

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

Reflections

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

49 Wellington Street East, The Gooderham or Flatiron Building – Romanesque Revival and French Gothic architecture styles – opened in 1892

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

Armouries

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

CN Tower and Skyscrapers

Architectural Photos, Toronto, Ontario

View from the water

Delhi, Ontario – My Top 5 Picks

Delhi, Ontario – My Top 5 Picks

Norfolk County is a rural municipality on the north shore of Lake Erie in Southwestern Ontario.  The county seat and largest community is Simcoe.  Some of the most notable communities in Norfolk County are Delhi, Port Dover, Simcoe, and Waterford.

Surrounding its many small communities is some of the most fertile land in Ontario. With a mild climate and lengthy growing season, the region has long been the center of the Ontario tobacco belt. Many farmers have begun the process of diversifying their crop selections to include lavender, ginseng, hazelnuts, and wolfberries as tobacco consumption continues to decrease.

Delhi is located off the junction of Highways 53 and 3.  Founded by Frederick Sovereign as Sovereign’s Corners around 1826, the community was renamed Fredericksburg and eventually its present-day name of Delhi, the name usually attributed locally to a postmaster honoring a major city of the British Empire, Delhi, India.  Prior to 1880, this town was known for its lumber industry.

Architectural Photos, Delhi, Ontario

Classical Greek

Architectural Photos, Delhi, Ontario

Gothic Revival, banding, dichromatic brickwork, pediment

Architectural Photos, Delhi, Ontario

#159 – Victorian – wraparound verandah

Architectural Photos, Delhi, Ontario

#187 – Georgian – fanlight (transom window) above door

Architectural Photos, Delhi, Ontario

#180 – heritage building – second floor wraparound verandah with cone-shaped roof with turned spindles, fretwork, dormer, bay window

Our Grandchildren in 2017

Raué Newsletter – “Christ among us, the hope of glory.”

Joyful best describes this year, especially when the grandchildren are around. The cameo expresses what I mean: Henry is our youngest. Women are jealous when they see his long eye-lashes.

Jaxson is seven, bright, lovable, and can think outside the box.

Andrew his eight year old brother is a handsome blue-eyed, avid reader and scored a bullseye.

Matthew is twelve and earned his junior black belt in Karate last month. He’s quiet, bright and thoughtful.

These are our four handsome grandsons who bring us amusement and lots of love.

And then there are another special lot, our three grand-daughters. They complete the happy Group of Seven.

Gabrielle and Julie are aged six and Katie is eight.

Katie has that precious gift of common sense, and is a gifted gymnast.

Julie has a great sense of humor, is a quick learner and an eager hiker.

Gabrielle is the youngest by three days. She’s spirited and excels in facial expressions.

Grandma and Henry enjoy a similar passion,   the merry-go-round.

Love to you all,

Harry and Barbara

Henry

Henry

Jaxson

Jaxson

Andrew

 

bullseye

Bullseye

Matthew – Junior Black Belt in Karate

 

 

 

 

 

Gabrielle

Gabrielle

Gabrielle

Julie

Julie

Katie and Gabrielle

Gabrielle, Julie, Katie

Henry with Grandma

Grandma with Henry on the carousel at Gage Park for the Mum Show

Harry with the chairs to view the Tall Ships coming into Hamilton Harbour

 

 

 

 

 

Our Family Newsletter for 2017

Raué Newsletter, 2017 – “Christ among us, the hope of glory.”

We received happy responses from our earlier Newsletter. One did comment that little was said about the grandparents. I’ll make up for that right now with this follow up letter.

We’re content to live in our Cottage style home located in the Valley Town of Dundas.

This Autumn Barbara applied for a temporary position with the city of Hamilton’s Emergency Medical Services and was hired on the spot. Only one person in the entire region qualified for the position; Barbara. It’s a position she had wished for six years earlier. She loves it, along with her other interests: publishing novels and photo books, which recapture history one photo at a time, and is an avid reader. For this reason, and since I have nothing better to do, I have the privilege of cleaning and cooking.

Cleaning also involved keeping up appearances, as nothing lasts forever. I renovated the bathroom, rebuilt the patio stones, rebuilt the garbage bin, re-coated the driveway, put a new roof on the smaller shed, painted both sheds, and moved the vegetable garden to the front yard (mmm grew the best organic carrots and beets in the entire valley). I did more, such as plant new black current bushes, and more. I’ll not refrain from boasting of such a resurgence of vitality and zest for life.

I felt alive and invigorated by all of this activity, lengthening the useful life of all of these possessions. I even had a chance to bring my tool box to Zane and Robyn’s house to drywall two bedrooms and a laundry room. Each day we worked close to mid-night. It was exhilarating, why? It was a creative, mental and physical and rewarding task which I was still able to do at the age of 76. How does it compare to dusting? No comment!

In May, of last year, Barbara and I flew to Vancouver. What a treat it was, to spend time with my brother John and his family in Vancouver and also with my sister, Mimi, and her family in Victoria. Barbara, with purpose, had her trusty camera and pen with her. We rented a car for a week and toured the Okanagan Valley. Barbara gets into a creative zone, camera strapped around her pretty neck and we walk the streets of: from Osoyoos, to Salmon Arms and all the places, such as Penticton, in between. Vancouver and Victoria were also captured on camera. Eventually she will compile, and publish, these excursions into photo books.

In June of last year we drove to Winnipeg to visit Barbara’s oldest brother, James and his lovely wife, Mary Ann. James guided us throughout spacious Winnipeg, the Chicago of the North, for six days of exploring the city with her captivating camera. Nine books in total captured the historic architecture of Winnipeg.

The smile on my face doesn’t mean that my life is perfect.  It means, I appreciate what I have and what God has blessed me with.

 

Thanks to our families: Zane and Robyn and children, Michael and Grace and their children, and Samson and Annette and their children, for loving us and giving us a lot of joy amidst the hardships of their busy adventurous lives. And thanks to family, friends, and neighbors like you to make life more interesting and lovable.

The person who has had the most influence on events this year, voted by Time magazine, is Donald Trump, the President of the ‘Divided States’. What do you think?

It may interest you to know who has had the most influence on events in my life this year. One is my first parent. His name is Adam. He lived to a ripe old age. Adam lived 930 years and then he died. Because of Adam I am dying through no choice of my own. The other is Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus lived only 33 years and then died. In him I have the awesome hope of life from the dead.

In Adam all are dying through no choice of their own. In Jesus, God’s son, this same all will be made alive. At this time of year we remember his birth. For this purpose was he born.

The real man smiles in trouble.

Collect moments not things.

 

A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

 

Harry and Barbara

 

Conestogo, Bloomingdale and West Montrose, Ontario – My Top 12 Picks

Conestogo, Bloomingdale and West Montrose, Ontario – My Top 12 Picks

The Township of Woolwich is located to the north and east of the City of Waterloo. Woolwich Township began to be settled in the late 1700s, with William Wallace being one of the first settlers arriving in 1798. The township was named in honor of a government surveyor. Woolwich consists of an extensive rural area along with residential communities and industrial/commercial areas. The residential communities include: Elmira, St. Jacobs, Breslau, Conestogo, Heidelberg, Maryhill, Bloomingdale, West Montrose, Foradale, Winterbourne, Crowsfoot Corners, Mundil, Weber, Shanz Station, Martin Grove Village and Eldale.

Connestogo is located at the junction of the Grand and Conestogo Rivers in the township of Woolwich in Waterloo Region. The area was first settled in the 1820s by predominantly Mennonite settlers who had emigrated from Pennsylvania. They were followed by people of German and British background.

The first mill in Woolwich Township was built in Conestogo in 1844 by David Musselman. Known earlier as Musselman’s Mills, the settlement was renamed Conestogo in 1852. The name originated from the town and river of Conestoga in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

By the middle of the 19th century, Conestogo was a thriving community of about 300 people. It boasted a number of businesses, including a foundry, flour mill, sawmill, furniture factory, paint factory, flax mill, distillery, four hotels, three blacksmiths, two wagon makers and a cooperage, among others. Two local brickyards produced the bricks of which many Conestogo buildings were constructed. The slow pace of Conestogo’s development after the 1870s resulted in much of the architectural heritage being well preserved.

The feed mill closed its feed production operation in 2008. New retail stores such as the Conestogo Mercantile and Baby Charlotte do business alongside the antique store and the well-known restaurant and dinner theater, the Blackforest Inn.

Bloomingdale was named in 1861, likely by a settler from Pennsylvania after Bloomingdale in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania.

West Montrose straddles the Grand River, one of Canada’s historic rivers. West Montrose was settled in 1806 by Scots from Montrose, Scotland. The village was an industrious community with a woolen mill, saw mill, lime kiln, feed mill, two blacksmith shops, shoemaker and several stores. In 1902 the railway built tracks and a station north of the village to transport goods and livestock. Today the peaceful village is surrounded by Mennonite farms and most of the people living in the community commute to larger centers to work. The more recent outlying town is home to many large residences.

The West Montrose covered bridge was constructed in 1881 by John and Benjamin Bear and is best known for being the last remaining historical covered bridge in Ontario. These bridges were known colloquially as ‘kissing bridges’ since couples would be out of sight as they passed through the bridge. While the original bridge was constructed entirely of wood, in a series of repairs and restorations the bridge uses a combination of materials but retains its original form.

Architectural Photos, Conestogo, Ontario

Conestogo Public School – Gothic, Romanesque-style central window arches, bevelled dentil moulding on side sections

Architectural Photos, Conestogo, Ontario

#1954 – two-storey tower-like bay, 2nd floor balcony

Architectural Photos, Conestogo, Ontario

1939 Sawmill Road, Conestogo – Italianate – 2nd floor balcony, both 1st and 2nd floor entrances

Architectural Photos, Conestogo, Ontario

1907 Sawmill Road, Conestogo – 2½ storey home, 2nd floor side balcony

Architectural Photos, Conestogo, Ontario

Old Landmark Inn, Conestogo – Italianate, cornice brackets

Architectural Photos, Conestogo, Ontario

1861 Sawmill Road, Conestogo – 3 storey tower with widow’s walk and iron cresting, cornice brackets

Architectural Photos, Bloomingdale, Ontario

Bloomingdale – Gothic Revival

Architectural Photos, Bloomingdale, Ontario

812 Sawmill Road, Bloomingdale – Georgian style

Architectural Photos, West Montrose, Ontario

West Montrose – Covered Bridge

Architectural Photos, West Montrose, Ontario

West Montrose – Stone Regency Cottage

Architectural Photos, West Montrose, Ontario

West Montrose – #52 – two storeys, Georgian style – 1858 Heritage Building

Architectural Photos, West Montrose, Ontario

#52 – end wall of stone, West Montrose

Lucknow, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Lucknow, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Lucknow is a community located in Bruce County, Ontario, located at the junction of Bruce Roads 1 and 86. Lucknow has a strong Scottish heritage back to the late 1800s when the Lucknow Caledonian Games were held for twenty years. The village was named after Lucknow, India where, in 1857, a battle Indian Rebellion of 1857 took place between the native rebels and the British army. Eli Stauffer first settled here in 1856 where he constructed a dam and built a sawmill. In 1858, Ralph Miller built Balaclava House, a log tavern.

Architectural Photos, Lucknow, Ontario

Stauffer Street – Gothic – stone architecture

Architectural Photos, Lucknow, Ontario

Campbell Street – mural – keystones on right

Architectural Photos, Lucknow, Ontario

Campbell Street – Second Empire style, mansard roof with dormers

Architectural Photos, Lucknow, Ontario

Campbell Street – Gothic Revival

Architectural Photos, Lucknow, Ontario

Stone architecture

Architectural Photos, Lucknow, Ontario

578 Havelock Street – Lucknow Presbyterian Church – erected 1889

Why I Plan

Why I Plan

A year ago in December 2016, I had my first introduction to planning a novel. Jennifer Blanchard reviewed Story Engineering by Larry Brooks over the course of four weeks. Then I read Story Fix by the same author, and Scene and Structure by Jack Bickham.

When I wrote my first book, Coins of Gold, I felt driven to write a story about my Mom and the life she lived. It was a celebration of her life, a woman who knew how to enjoy the simple things of life. I knew nothing about how a story should be structured or that there was even such a thing as story structure.

“Show don’t tell” were just words with no meaning. Character arc I may have heard of, but I certainly did not know how to apply it in my writing. I always admired Daniel Boone when I was growing up. I loved to watch the stories of his adventures as seen on television. For my second book, I decided to write a fictional story about Daniel Boone and I called it Arrows, Indians and Love. Each day I waited for inspiration, did research of course, and slowly the story came about.

One of my fans suggested I write about a Canadian hero. I chose Laura Secord as my next character and built a story around my family in central Ontario intertwined with the Secord family and the service Laura did for Canada during the War of 1812. I compiled a Cromwell family history tracing my ancestors back to the 1100s and wrote some books of interest to me (Olympics, Wonders of the World, Wars, Inventions, etc.).

My next inspiration was a novel about Joe and Kate starting with a dream of going to Montana. It became a series that I wrote as inspiration arrived. I didn’t understand about stakes in a story and why they are needed. I didn’t understand about inner demons and antagonists. I didn’t understand the need for a resolution to a problem. I just tried to have a good ending to the life story.

I realized I needed better covers so I approached Andrew Rudd www.detailfordesign.com and he produced five lovely covers for my Montana Series.

What was the plot of my books? Was my main character wanting something and going on a journey to achieve it? I didn’t have a clue about this aspect of a story either. What opposition was there in my stories? There were some inner struggles, but exterior struggles were really absent. The idea that people wanted to be transported into the lives of the characters was a nice thought, but I didn’t know about the need to overcome opposition, defeat it and be the victor. These ideas were completely foreign to me.

Then I had the opportunity to join a group of authors with Jennifer Blanchard www.jenniferblanchard.net  to take the Write Your Damn Novel (WYDN) course. Jennifer walked us through the stages of planning our stories from the premise and concept, through the journey that needs to occur to make a story work. I learned about a hook – a medallion is my hook for my next novel. I learned about First and Second Plot Points, First and Second Pinch Points and a Midpoint. They were all new terms for me to get my head around.

I started with a couple of thoughts for a novel. I didn’t have much of a premise or concept, but I pushed ahead to stay on track with the course, learning to apply some of the things as I went along. I managed to plan about three quarters of the book, knowing how it would turn out, before I started writing.

There are those who think that planning a novel takes away the creativity. Nothing could be further from the truth. Just because I had the title for the scenes and knew sort of how the story was going to progress, inspiration had its part along the way and many twists and turns came in as the words mounted up. There were daily blog posts, videos, and additional courses and books along the way to help me get my novel finished.

Once I had the novel finished as much as I could do, then there was the scary part of actually sending my manuscript to a content editor. Jennifer Blanchard agreed to perform this service for me. A little over a month later, I had several pages of written notes, and an hour long conversation on where the novel was not working and lots of suggestions of how to fix it.

I had a well-developed main character, I had a journey he was on, and I had some interesting scenes. I managed to break many of the biggest story mistakes writers make but this was all a learning process. I had random things in the story which did not connect to the main story. Jennifer was very encouraging on what was working and gave me lots of suggestions of how to make it work better.

I went back to the drawing board, so to speak. I was determined to make changes and create an even better story for my readers to enjoy. I worked on it daily over the next couple of months until I was satisfied that I had done everything I could to improve the story structure. It is now back to my content editor and by year’s end I will have more ideas of what to fix, or get the nod of approval that it now works.

Being a multi-passionate person, my photography hobby expanded into another whole line of work. I love the old architecture in towns and started taking pictures. The first town I photographed was London, Ontario. When I look back at the first book I created, I chuckle to myself. I had the basic concepts, but I have grown into the project as the years have gone by. I do research ahead of time so that I have a better idea of where to start a project. Most towns I can complete in a day, but usually that will be a long day. I never seem to have enough time to finish as I would like to. There are always more pictures I could take.

Then comes the time I get to play around with the pictures and put them into books. I say “play” because it doesn’t seem like work. I love to compile the histories in photos, Saving Our History One Photo at a Time.

When we travelled to Winnipeg, Manitoba last year to visit my brother James and his wife Mary Ann, I thought it would be “nice” to photograph some of the buildings in the city. James knows the city very well, and he took us on our first photograph session. Wow! What a city to photograph! Day after day, James took us to another area with lovely architecture. We came home in the late afternoon every day with three or four hundred pictures on the camera.

After returning home, I had a huge project to put together. There were many articles on the architecture of Winnipeg available for me to add to the knowledge included in my pictorial history of the city where I was born. It took nine books to include all of the choice pictures I had taken. There are always pictures which get discarded. That’s the plus of digital photography – I can take as many pictures as I like, from as many angles as I like, and then choose the best ones.

I have my next photo projects planned and research done of the cities and towns. We get to see a whole different picture of the places we visit. We often don’t get into the museums and places of interest, although sometimes we do. Depending on the town, I may get a lot of walking in; in other towns, buildings are more scattered and Harry drives me from place to place. What I love to do is to be left on my own for an hour or two and explore and see what I find. I never limit myself to what I am told are the heritage buildings – I want to record more than those. Some architecture is unique, some is rather plain. I have learned about different architectural styles as I have progressed through the years. I have also learned terms that are used.

It is nearly time for me to plan the first one hundred days of 2018. Yes, it is just around the corner. It has been great to be connected to the 100 Day Challenge since 2007 as I am encouraged to plan. I have accomplished much more in the last ten years that I would have if I had not planned what I was going to do and given myself deadlines for accomplishing the goals I set. Sometimes it takes me longer than I originally planned to complete items, but then I give myself a new time frame to work towards.

And my journey carries on. To see some of the things I have accomplished, check out my website at http://barbararaue.ca.

What are your plans for this week, month, and the year 2018? If you plan, set yourself deadlines, and put in the work, you will be amazed what you can accomplish.