July, 2019:

Niagara Falls, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Niagara Falls, Ontario Book 2

Niagara Falls Ontario is located along the Niagara Gorge on the western bank of the Niagara River which flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario.

In 1853 construction began to build an international suspension bridge over the Niagara Gorge. This brought work and prosperity to the north end of Stamford Township. A shanty-town development was erected to house workers at the base of the bridge. Over the years this became the Village of Elgin. Amalgamation of the Village of Elgin with the Town of Clifton was caused by the economic impact of the Great Western, Erie and Ontario Railways. The prosperous town boasted fifteen grocery stores and twenty saloons and hotels.

Samuel Zimmerman, one of the founding fathers of the city, came from Pennsylvania in 1842 with lots of ambition, and some knowledge of construction. He rebuilt parts of the Welland Canal. Recognizing the importance of railroads, Zimmerman began building railway lines including the Great Western (now Canadian National) from Hamilton. Zimmerman’s company played a role in building the Railway Suspension Bridge across the Niagara River Gorge.

During Zimmerman’s lifetime, there were four small communities within what is now Niagara Falls: Chippawa to the south, Clifton, Drummondville, and Stamford Village in the north.

The majority of the early downtown businesses were located on the lower part of Bridge Street, Erie Avenue and River Road, with a few businesses on Clifton Avenue (now Zimmerman) and Park Street. At the turn of the century, retail activity slowly started to shift to Queen Street where to date some of these firms are still operating. The residences of Queen Street have given way to stores and offices that form the Downtown core we see today.

Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
6590 Dunn Street – Stamford Township Lot 161 was first obtained from the Crown by Haggai Skinner who likely built the earlier cabin. It was Henry Spence’s farm from 1854 to 1885. Mr. Spence came from England in 1834 and was noted for his fine brickwork. In 1893, the house and property were purchased by David Weaver and remained in the Weaver family until 1973. The larger front section of the house was constructed by Drummondville Mason Henry Spence, while the rear wood frame wing was originally a settler’s cabin dating to around 1800. An old brick scullery is also attached to the west side of the cabin and has remnants of an original cauldron and bread oven. A board-and-batten garage was added to the rear by the current owners.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4267 Bridge Street – Via Rail Station – Positioned beside the International Railway Bridge, this was the busiest and most prestigious terminal of the Great Western and Grand Trunk Railroads. It serviced the growing tourist trade, and was a popular social center with a restaurant in the east wing. Constructed in the Gothic Revival style favored for rail depots of the Victorian age, it has a hipped gable roof, decorative brick banding and limestone door and window accents. Originally installed in the gable ends were carved barge boards.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4310 Queen Street – City Hall – 1866 – For years there was a small balcony over the front entrance and orators spoke to the crowds gathered below. It served as City Hall for Niagara Falls until the new building opened in May 1970.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4337 Simcoe Street – multi-sloped roofs, Romanesque style window arches on ground floor, enclosed sun porch above veranda, decorative cornice and brackets, fish scale patterning on chipped gables
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
Zimmerman Avenue – Bank – Mansard roof with dormers, quoining around windows and doors, two-storey oriel windows with stepped parapets
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4711 Zimmerman Avenue – 1896 – The house served as both the home and office of Dr. James McGarry, and later that of his son, pediatrician Dr. Howard McGarry. Between them, the house was the center of medical care for families in Niagara Falls over the course of nearly ninety years. The home has a corner tower, pressed brick and limestone exterior, and irregular roof line. The large Neo-Classical front porch has rounded columns, frieze and a decorated closed pediment. A surgery was added to the rear of the house in 1905.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4761 Zimmerman Avenue – Bampfield Hall – James Bampfield built this second home for his wife Margaret who apparently never liked their first house. For generations it remained the property of the Bampfields as they rose to become one of the most prominent commercial families in Niagara Falls. The house is built primarily in the Gothic Revival style with pointed windows, a jerkinhead roof, and gingerbread trim in the gable ends. Its upper structure exhibits the Second Empire style elements of a mansard roof on the central tower and iron cresting on the roof. The Classical style verandah was a later early 20th century addition.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4835 Zimmerman Avenue – Bedham Hall Bed and Breakfast – located on Niagara River two miles from Whirlpool Bridge
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4268 Morrison Street – two-storey bay window, hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4851 River Road – Doran House – 1886 – Park Place Bed and Breakfast – W.L. Doran and his brother owned the Dominion Suspender Company and Niagara Necktie Factories in town. The house served as an unofficial social club and was the scene of both formal balls and many a wild party. It is in the Queen Anne Revival style. Built of fine cream-colored brick, it has a round corner tower with a conical roof, gable windows of various shapes and a curved verandah with a molded frieze supported by slender columns. To the rear of the house is the original detached coach house.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
4325 Bampfield Street – Built by local lumber merchant John Merrall, this was the first home of the Bampfield family on their arrival in Clifton in 1860. James Bampfield operated the Great Western Restaurant in the east wing of the railroad station. The house was also reputedly used as a brothel for many years earlier in this century. The house is a unique variant of the Regency Style with a perfectly square plan, tall limestone block walls and a high raised basement. The basement was dynamited out of the underlying bedrock and built in the earth and rubble technique without mortar. The attached rear porch shed and roof dormers are later additions.

Niagara Falls, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 9 Picks

Niagara Falls, Ontario Book 1

Niagara Falls Ontario is located along the Niagara Falls waterfalls and the Niagara Gorge on the western bank of the Niagara River, which flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario. The Niagara River flows over Niagara Falls at this location and creates a natural spectacle that attracts millions of tourists each year. Niagara Falls is about 130 kilometers (81 miles) by road from Toronto, which is across Lake Ontario to the north.

Louis Hennepin, a French priest and missionary, is believed to be the first European to visit the area in the 1670s. Increased settlement in this area took place during and after the American Revolutionary War, when the British Crown made land grants to Loyalists to help them resettle in Upper Canada and provide some compensation for their losses after the United States became independent. Loyalist Robert Land received 200 acres and was one of the first people of European descent to settle in the Niagara Region.

Tourism started in the early nineteenth century. The falls became known as a natural wonder, due in part to paintings by prominent American artists such as Albert Bierstadt. Niagara Falls is the self-proclaimed “honeymoon capital of the world.”

With a plentiful and inexpensive source of hydroelectric power from the waterfalls, many electro-chemical and electro-metallurgical industries located there in the early to mid-20th century.

Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
6145 Corwin Avenue – built in 1876 – Egerton Ryerson Morden built and lived in this house. He operated a successful nursery on ten acres of land that surrounded his home. He specialized in small fruit plants and ornamental trees. The house is an example of board and batten in the Italianate and Stickley styles. It has an irregular “L” shaped plan with a one-storey kitchen and bedroom addition to the rear. It has patterned wood shingles and ornamental roof brackets. The house was relocated from Dorchester Road to Corwin Avenue.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
6151 Culp Street – This house is an example of Cottage Gothic and was built in 1855. It has a central peaked Gothic gable and a jerkin head roof (a roof having a hipped end truncating a gable). The windows have simple wooden drip caps. The central door opening has a transom and sidelights.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
6023 Culp Street – John Allen Orchard who owned this house was a prominent member of the Drummondville and Stamford Communities. He came with his father from England in 1836. He purchased Lot 5 on Culp Street in 1856 and the house was built soon after. He served as Township Clerk and Clerk of the Division Court. His nephew Joseph Cadham lived there after his uncle’s death in 1896. Joseph’s daughter Margaret inherited the house and lived there the rest of her life. This house has many features of the Queen Anne Revival style. The house has both decorative and wood shingle finish and clapboard siding. The tower and verandah were probably added later in the 1890s.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
5982 Culp Street – Francis Sheriff and Thomas Bright started the Niagara Falls Wine Company (Brights Wines) in Toronto in 1874. They moved to Niagara Falls in 1890 to be closer to their major source of grapes. This house was built for Francis Sheriff in 1894 for a cost of $4000.00. It is in the Queen Anne Revival style with an asymmetrical form, deep porch, and an irregular roof line which includes gables, dormers and a turret. The house exterior is brick with decorative cedar shingles on the turret and in the gables. The three-part window in the front gable is an adaptation of the Palladian style; the central section has a round headed window. The large wraparound porch has Tuscan style columns that rest on a brick base topped with a square stone cap.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
6161 Main Street – “A Night to Remember” Bed & Breakfast – Mary E. Ferguson purchased this lot in 1899 and had this house built for rental purposes. It was built in the Queen Anne Revival style. It has an asymmetrical form with a complex roof. The bay window of the second floor extends to form a third-floor tower with a bell-shaped roof. The wraparound porch features columns and a pediment with intricate scroll work.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
6248 Main Street – St. Mary’s Nativity of the Holy Mother of God Ukrainian Catholic Church – It was built by the local congregation to celebrate the 1000th anniversary of the Ukrainian people’s conversion to Christianity. The church follows traditional forms of Ukrainian architecture with a central dome over a four-armed cruciform pattern. There are no windows on the lower level as churches were also used as sanctuaries for the villagers when they were attacked by marauding Mongol tribes. St. Mary’s was built using huge white pine logs from northern Ontario.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
5810 Ferry Street – Stamford Township Hall was erected in 1874. It is now the Niagara Falls History Museum. The hall with its durable hammer dressed limestone construction in its eclectic Italianate styling includes a gabled hip roof with brackets and gingerbread trim, windows of different shape on the first and second storeys, and the main entrance archway with a keystone and voussoirs.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
5993 Barker Street – Henry Spence (1809-1894) was a successful mason and builder of the Drummondville area. Born in England, he emigrated to Canada with his family in 1817. He had acquired a significant amount of property over the years in what is now central Drummondville. He also owned a homestead farm on Township Lot 161 south of present-day Dunn Street from 1854-1885. The main part of the house has a square stone foundation; there is a rear wing with a gable roof. There is a semi-elliptical transom over the front door, a large three-part parlor window, and a bay window. The front porch with its square tapering support columns is likely an early 20th century addition.
Architectural Photos, Niagara Falls, Ontario
5775 Peer Street – John Misener Jr. was born in 1829. He was 26 when he purchased the land on Peer Street from his father. His father, Captain John Misener owned and operated a wagon-making business on the corner of Main Street and Peer Street. John Misener Jr. assumed the wagon-making business after his father’s death in 1855. The house, c. 1855, is in the Ontario Gothic style with a central gable in the roof. The gable window design with a pediment is an adaptation of Italianate form. The field stone wall of the verandah was a later addition. The upper portion of the verandah features elaborate woodwork with turned posts.

Dunnville, Ontario Book 2 and Area in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Dunnville, Ontario Book 2 and Area

Haldimand County is a municipality on the Niagara Peninsula in Southern Ontario, on the north shore of Lake Erie, and on the Grand River. Haldimand was first created as a county in 1800, from a portion of Norfolk. It was named after the governor of the Province of Quebec Sir Frederick Haldimand. From 1974 to 2000, Haldimand County and Norfolk County were merged to form the Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk.

The population centers in Haldimand are Caledonia, Dunnville, Hagersville, Jarvis and Cayuga. Most of Haldimand is agricultural land, although some heavy industry, including the Nanticoke Generating Station, is located here. Some of the smaller communities within the municipality are Byng, Canborough, Canfield, Cheapside, Fisherville, Kohler, Lowbanks, Nanticoke, Rainham Centre, Selkirk, South Cayuga, Sweets Corners, and York.

Dunnville is a community near the mouth of Grand River in Haldimand County, and is only a few kilometers from Lake Erie. Dunnville was one of the early thriving centers of Upper Canada and Ontario. Following the American Revolution, a six-mile strip of land on both sides of the Grand River from its mouth to its sources was opened up to settlement by displaced members of the Six Nations Confederacy. The land was granted to the Iroquois tribes by the British to compensate the Confederacy for land lost in the United States during the revolution. The British originally intended the land to remain in the hands of the Indians, but Mohawk Chief Joseph Brant wanted to open it up to settlement in order to create a source of revenue. Brant persuaded the Six Nations to surrender large blocks of land. Many of the early European arrivals were United Empire Loyalists.

South Cayuga lies on the north shore of Lake Erie, ten kilometers east of Dunnville. Initially part of the Six Nations of the Grand River Indian Reserve, the heavy clay soil of South Cayuga Township was well suited to the cultivation of grain, hay, and livestock.

Sweet’s Corners is located on Rainham Road west of South Cayuga.

Kohler was named for the Kohler family, one of many German immigrants who came to the area in the mid-1800s. It is located on County Road 8 south of Cayuga, and north of Rainham Centre.

Jarvis is located near the towns of Simcoe, Cayuga, Port Dover and Hagersville. Jarvis is strategically located at the junction of Highways 3 and 6. Jarvis has some excellent examples of brick architecture. Many of the historic homes were built after 1873. Many of the town’s restaurants and shops are clustered around the intersection of the highways. The majority of the buildings are red brick.

Architectural Photos, Dunnville, Ontario
111 Alder Street – turret
Architectural Photos, Dunnville, Ontario
109 Alder Street – two-story bay window, dormer in attic
Architectural Photos, Dunnville, Ontario
225 Alder Street West – second floor balcony
Photos, Dunnville, Ontario
“Muddy” the mudcat – A mudcat is a form of channel catfish and has long been associated with Dunnville. At over fifty feet in length, this is the largest statue of its kind in the world.
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
6156 Rainham Road, South Cayuga
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
Rainham Road, South Cayuga
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
5330 Rainham Road, Sweet’s Corners – bay window with cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
6027 Rainham Road, Sweet’s Corners – three-story, mansard roof, frontispiece, bay window on side, full-width veranda
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
2191 Lakeshore Road – Gothic – two-story baby window, verge board trim on gables
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
Lakeshore Road – hipped roof, cornice brackets, widows’ walk on rooftop
Architectural Photos, Haldimand County, Ontario
1204 Kohler Road, Kohler – Gothic – verge board trim on gables, bay window
Architectural Photos, Jarvis, Ontario
60 Talbot Street East, Jarvis – Italianate style with frontispiece, triangular pediment, dormers in the attic
Architectural Photos, Jarvis, Ontario
45 Talbot Street, Jarvis – Second Empire style – mansard roof, dormers in roof, single cornice brackets, cornice return on small gables on window dormers
Architectural Photos, Jarvis, Ontario
53 Talbot Street East, Jarvis – Jones-Doughty Residence, one of the oldest homes in Jarvis, built in 1865 by local builders with the bricks supplied by the local Rodgers Brick Yard, is a polychromatic brick house with hints of Italianate styling as seen in the hip roof, round-headed windows, paired brackets, and window arches. Decorative brick patterning is found in the entry porch, at the wall corners and cornice, and above and below the windows. In the entry doorway, arched sidelights flank both the door and transom. The inner door has a large glass panel, sidelights and transom. Iron rods pass through the house to help stabilize it.