November, 2018:

Paris, Ontario – Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Paris, Ontario – Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Paris, Ontario is located on the Grand River.  It was first settled by Hiram Capron a native of Vermont who, in 1822, emigrated to Norfolk County where he helped to establish one of Upper Canada’s earliest iron foundries.  He settled here at the Forks of the Grand (where the Grand and Nith Rivers meet) in 1829, divided part of his land into town lots, and in 1830 constructed a grist-mill and named the town after the gypsum deposits that were mined nearby. Gypsum is used to make plaster of Paris.

The use of cobblestones to construct buildings was introduced to the area by Levi Boughton when he erected St. James Church in 1839; this was the first cobblestone structure in Paris. Two churches and ten homes, all in current use, are made of numerous such stones taken from the rivers. Other architectural styles that are visible in the downtown area include Edwardian, Gothic and Post Modern.

Dominion Day 1879 began at six a.m. with the ringing of all the town bells. Sports and games were played throughout the day – lacrosse, cricket, boat races, jumping contests, and foot races with prizes for the winners. In the evening there were bonfires and fireworks.

Since its earliest days, Paris was the site of gypsum beds. When ground to a powder in a mill, gypsum, or Plaster of Paris, could be used as a fertilizer, to coat the interior walls of a home, or for casts to set broken bones.

Jim Percival created scale models of the thirteen cobblestone buildings in Paris.

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

42 Broadway Street East – Gouinlock House – is a one-storey, rubble-stone, building constructed in 1845. The Gouinlock House is associated with John Penman, one of Paris’s leading early industrialists and the co-founder of the Penman Manufacturing Company Limited. Penman rented this home, in the mid-1880s, while his permanent residence, Penmarvian, was under renovation. The Gouinlock House is thought to be the only solid rubble-stone building in Paris. This home features local materials and skilled craftsmanship. The exterior of the home was parging and etched to resemble cut stone blocks or coursed ashlar. The more notable features of this home include the large windows, the chimneys, the etched glass doors and the woodwork. Though both the enclosed verandah and a rear portion of the home were additions, the use of rubble-stone and the sympathetic design maintained the integrity of the home.

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

165 Grand River Street North was built by Levi Boughton for Norman and Elizabeth Hamilton, Americans who arrived in Paris about 1831. Norman was a wealthy local industrialist, miller and brewer. This three-storey cobblestone building is designed in the Greek Revival style c. 1839-1844 – it appears to be 1½-storeys in height – the second storey windows are set in light-wells in the verandah roof and are concealed from view by the deep architrave of the verandah. The pillars are square. The triple hung windows on the front façade can be opened so that you can walk out onto the verandah. A lower basement walk-out floor exits to the rear yard. The Hamilton’s son-in-law, Paul Wickson, used the belvedere as his art studio; he specialized in painting animals and rural scenes. An addition was added in 1861 to accommodate visiting family members.

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

165 Grand River Street North – scale model

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

185 Grand River Street North – Penmarvian Retirement Home was built in 1845 by the founder of Paris, Hiram Capron, as a modest two storey building. In 1887 local industrialist John Penman purchased the home and added the Victorian turrets, towers and arches.

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

184 Grand River Street North – built in 1886 in the Italianate style for Captain Cox who was Postmaster of Paris – square tower with half-round windows, iron cresting on roof top; dichromatic brickwork – now the William Kipp Funeral Home

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontarioario

199 Grand River Street North – red brick – Edwardian style

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

William Street – Italianate style – dichromatic brickwork, banding, two-storey bay windows, hipped roof

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

140 West River Street – 1874 – This was the first of two large textile mills built by Paris industrialist John Penman. Dependent on waterpower in the beginning, a generating plant still stands behind the mill buildings on the bank of the Nith River.

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

55 Banfield Street – hipped roof, corner quoins

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

18 Banfield Street – Edwardian style – Palladian window, turret extending through the roof

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

33 Banfield Street – Italianate with two-storey frontispiece topped by a gable with decorative verge boards and finial

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

1 Banfield Street – built about 1868 by miller Charles Whitlaw – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, compound chimneys

Architectural Photos, Paris, Ontario

36 Jane Street – Italianate – hipped roof, cornice brackets, wraparound verandah, bay window

Paris, Ontario – Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Paris, Ontario – Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Paris, Ontario is located on the Grand River. It was first settled by Hiram Capron a native of Vermont who, in 1822, emigrated to Norfolk County where he helped to establish one of Upper Canada’s earliest iron foundries. He settled here at the Forks of the Grand (where the Grand and Nith Rivers meet) in 1829, divided part of his land into town lots, and in 1830 constructed a grist-mill and named the town after the gypsum deposits that were mined nearby. Gypsum is used to make plaster of Paris. The town of Paris is often referred to as the “cobblestone capital of Canada” because of the many cobblestone buildings that are still standing.

Paris is home to thirteen cobblestone buildings. Mason Levi Boughton inspired Paris’ cobblestone technique in the mid to late 1800s. It is estimated that over 14,000 cobblestones were required to build one traditional farmhouse. Each cobblestone is about the size of a sweet potato. Cobblestone architecture refers to the use of cobblestones embedded in mortar to erect walls of houses and commercial buildings.

Levi Boughton was born in Normandale, New York in 1805. He came to Brantford, Ontario in 1835 and in 1838 he moved to Paris. He brought the cobblestone craft to Paris. The cobbles are fist-sized rocks. Boys were paid ten cents a day to walk beside a sled pulled by oxen and throw cobbles turned up by ploughing into the sled. Mortar is laid in horizontal courses with cobbles framed with mortar joints. Cobblestone walls use lime mortar which is a mixture of lime and sand. Lime mortar sets slower, is more elastic and easier to work with than cement-based mortars. Because lime mortars are porous, relatively soft, and have low tensile strength, corners and wall openings in cobblestone structures are strengthened by rectangular blocks of stone called quoins. Window sills and lentils were also reinforced.

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

22 Church Street – Dr. Alfred Bosworth and his wife Sarah built their home in 1845. It is in the Queen Anne Regency style and has cobblestones on the front and south facades and cut fieldstones on the other two sides. In 1870, Reverend and Mrs. Thomas Henderson were living in the house. Originally from Scotland, Rev. Henderson wrote to his friends the Bell family and advised them to come to Canada for a healthier environment for their son Alexander Graham Bell.

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

31 Church Street

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

40 Dumfries Street – pre 1841 – Hugh Finlayson was the first mayor of Paris and also the first speaker of the Provincial parliament. He lived in this Georgian red brick house with Neo-Classical features.

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

17 Dumfries Street – Italianate with two-storey tower-like bay – Beautiful century home within walking distance to downtown

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

57 Main Street – stone Regency Cottage, dormer in attic

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

19 Queen Street – Levi Boughton’s house is an Ontario cottage is simple and elegant. It looks small but it has twelve foot ceilings. The exterior has cobblestone walls on three sides. The cobblestones are small and evenly matched in size and color. The Boughtons had sixteen children and three of them became masons and plasterers. Under the low pitched roof is nested the plastered and painted attic with a height of less than five feet at the peak – sleeping quarters for the children.

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

3 Arnold Street – Ouse Lodge (named after Ouse River – now Grand River) – early 1840s – Italianate cobblestone, two-storey bay window, second floor balcony, corner quoins – built by Levi Boughton as the Anglican Rectory for Rev. William Morse. Morse was also a musician and the house had a pipe organ.

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

14 Grand River Street South – yellow brick, voussoirs and keystones, two-storey bay window, cornice brackets

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

52 Grand River Street South – Greek Revival style – house of Asa Wolverton (sawmill owner), 1851 – wood frame construction covered in plaster of Paris

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

106 Grand River Street North – The Arlington Hotel – c. 1850s, 1888 – 4-storey stucco and yellow brick reminiscent of the Chateau style, Romanesque style arcades supported by red-brown marble columns at the street level, octagonal tower, arched and rectangular windows

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

16 Broadway Street West – cobblestone masonry in the Greek Revival style was built in 1845. Cast iron grills cover “stomacher” windows beneath the eaves. A well-matched addition in 1885 housed a doctor’s office. Smooth stones lintels and sills; the cobblestones are tilted; Greek symbols on the portico; dormers in attic; iron cresting on roof.

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

30 Broadway Street West – Italianate, cornice brackets, corner quoins, two-storey bay window

Architectural Photos, Paris Ontario

36 Broadway Street West – Italianate, paired cornice brackets, iron cresting on second floor balcony, two-storey bay window