February, 2020:

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 2

Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
55 King Street West – Italianate – decorative gable and cornice with brackets
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
129 King Street West – paired cornice brackets, two-story bay
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
130 King Street East – decorative cornice on house and veranda
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
143 and 145 King Street East – Neo-Colonial style with gambrel roots
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
108 Church Street
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
90 Canterbury Street – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
112 Canterbury Street – Italianate – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window, second-floor balcony, transom window above door
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
44 Victoria Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial on gable
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
89 Ann Street – pediment with decorative tympanum, dormer with triple windows
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
140 Ann Street – 2½-storey bay with fretwork, semi-circular window in gable, enclosed sun porch on second floor
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
145 Ann Street – multi-windowed dormer, second-floor balcony, decorative cornice, Doric pillars supporting veranda

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 1

The town of Ingersoll is ten miles from Woodstock, twenty-one miles from London, and ninety-eight from Toronto. Ingersoll was incorporated in 1865, and by the enterprise of its inhabitants enjoyed a steady and progressive growth. Most of the town was built on the sides and summit of the high gravelly banks of the River Thames, which flows through it and supplies constant water power, of which due advantage was taken by several factories at the waterside. The town got its name from a pioneer family named Ingersoll, who were among the first settlers in this district and took a very prominent part in the early career of the community.

It was situated on the Great Western Division of the Grand Trunk Railway, and also on the Credit Valley Branch of the Canadian Pacific. The country around is fertile, and large quantities of cheese were shipped from here. The manufacture of flour and cornmeal, with woolen and planing mills, a tannery and four agricultural implement factories, formed its chief industries; grain, livestock, and general manufactured products, in addition to cheese, formed its chief shipments.

In 1886 a special effort was made to induce desirable factories to locate here and in the following year the John Morrow Machine Screw Works, the Evans Bros. and Littler Piano factory and the Hault furniture factory were secured by giving liberal bonuses. Later on, the St. Charles Condenser and the Ingersoll Nut Factory were opened.

Ingersoll was the first town in Canada to adopt the silica-barytic sidewalks in 1890 when a contract was given to Otto Guelich of Detroit, to construct a sidewalk on the east side of Thames Street from the Atlantic House to the Baptist Tabernacle, a distance of three blocks. In 1891 a local company was organized with Walter Mills as manager, and year by year the work has been carried on till now nearly every street on both sides has a nice, clean, smooth silica-barytic sidewalk, totaling about fifty miles.

Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
181 Oxford Street – This cement block house was built for R.A. Skinner who owned and operated Skinner’s Livery on the north side of Charles Street at the Oxford corner. Stained-glass panel on first floor window; pediment above porch with Doric pillars; a lion on either side of the front steps. This home was the scene of many elaborate house parties, the form of entertainment that made up the fabric of social life of the times. The Skinner Livery, sometimes referred to as the Bon Ton Livery, maintained vehicles for pleasure driving, business trips, weddings, funerals, etc.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
185 Oxford Street – This one-story Regency Cottage with a hipped roof is over one hundred years old. Its most attractive features are the front porch with the decorative fascia board, molded brackets and interesting railing construction and the two stained-glass panels in the front windows. This house was built for his sister by F. Richardson, lumber dealer and owner of a planing mill. He became involved in the lumber business around 1885 and erected or supplied lumber for many buildings in the area.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
189 Oxford Street – This large brick building, one of the older homes in this section of Oxford Street, was erected by the Christopher Brothers and occupied by Aaron Christopher for a number of years. The broad bracketed eave of the Italianate style was common in Ontario around 1860. The Christopher Brothers were well known Ingersoll contractors who built many structures, still in use in the Town (e.g. Daly House and the Anglican Church, as well as many quality homes). It has a bay window with three windows.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
213 Oxford Street – This dwelling, commonly referred to as the Gray House, was built in three sections. The angled window frame on the south side is typical of the architectural style of the 1850s and 1860s. It was purchased by Benjamin Gray in 1895 for $450.00 from John Hugi II, well known Ingersoll Photographer. At one time Benjamin Gray was the market clerk at the Town Hall and he also collected the rental fee, sometimes as low as $1.00, for the use of the auditorium. There is a cornice return on the large gable and on the pediment above the porch which is supported by square pillars.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
218 Oxford Street – This beautiful red brick home was built in 1896 for Henry G. Boyse. He owned and operated a farm near Verschoyle where he was born. Later he moved to Ingersoll and opened a flour and feed store at 70 Thames Street North. The roofing is the original Welsh Slate as is the iron work around the roof top and porch railing.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
244 Oxford Street – This white frame Victorian style house was built by Justus Miller in 1895. In the 1880s he and his brother became successful contractors for the Dominion Government, constructing such large public works as canal locks, docks, etc. After moving to Mount Elgin, he became engaged in the lumber business. The mass production of thin studs and joists replaced the massive timbers needed to frame a house. These homes were termed “Stick Style”. This house incorporated a whimsical tower, bay windows, interesting roof angles and a veranda with softly curved arches and fancy woodwork.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
250 Oxford Street – Decorative barge board (gingerbread), taken from designs found in windows of medieval churches, became a popular addition to houses in the 1860s. It was cut from three-inch-thick pine boards. The earliest barge board was more board than space but later took on a lacy look, indicating that this dwelling was built circa 1880-1890. The gables of this Victoria home are further emphasized by the addition of the finials. The original yellow brick has been painted.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
261 Oxford Street – This house built circa 1882 was one of the first to be constructed of the smooth red brick which became available at this time. The exterior walls were double bricked. Brick was also used for some of the interior wall construction which became apparent when a former owner removed two of the walls to enlarge a room. On the south side was a conservatory and green house which was replaced by a sun room. A dumb waiter, with several shelves and sliding glass doors, allowed food to be raised to the kitchen from the basement which was used as a cold storage. Originally the house had five fireplaces. Beautifully carved woodwork adorns the remaining mantles as well as the banister railing. Mr. Spencer Freeman was the original owner. Later C.W. Riley, a local cheese maker bought the property. He was the nephew of C.W. Riley Sr. “Cheese King of Western Ontario” and took over the ownership of Slawson’s Cheese Company, Ingersoll from his uncle. There is a two-story bay window; finials on gables.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
270 Oxford Street – The corner stone of this red brick Victorian home built in 1897 was discovered during renovations and bears the name “Buchanan”. The property was purchased in the early 1900s by Mr. & Mrs. G. Bartlett, clothing merchants in Ingersoll for many years. The home with its eleven-foot ceilings has four bedrooms, the original “maids” staircase and an elegant winding cherry staircase in the front hall. The fretwork design paneling and the beveled glass in the front door and in upstairs windows have been preserved.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
276 Oxford Street – Oxford Manor Retirement Home – This large yellow brick Italianate Villa style home was built circa 1880 by the Christopher Brothers and was the residence of Aaron Christopher. The design was introduced in England at the beginning of Queen Victoria’s reign as a model suburban housing for the rising mercantile class. Its main feature is the central Tuscan Tower with its tall rounded Italianate style windows and eaves.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
305 Oxford Street – This yellow brick Victorian home, built circa 1865, features a two-story detached barn where the original occupants stabled their horses and carriages. Mr. Richard Seldon and his daughter, Annie, who lived here from 1894 to 1967, served as Clerks for the Township of North Oxford. Between 1918 and 1967 residents came to the house to pay their taxes in what is now the formal dining room. High ceilings, elaborate moldings, wide baseboards and pine floors grace each of the formal rooms in the main part of the house. The brass chandeliers in the dining room and lower hall are original, as is the fireplace in the parlor. Molded cherubs decorate one of the two curved archways upstairs. The servants’ quarters were located in the rear portion of the house along with the summer kitchen which retains its original painted tin ceiling. The Seldon House with its triple brick exterior walls was built to last. It has paired cornice brackets, a second-floor balcony, and two-story bay windows.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
310 Oxford Street – This Neo-Gothic style home referred to as the “Gayfer House” was built in 1863 by Noxon. Except for the removal of a wrought iron fence bordering the street, the house from the front appears as it did when first built. In the early 1900s the rear wing was demolished and a sun room, pantry and rear vestibule were erected using the original brick. The three chimneys are chimney flues and ventilation chimneys. The original roofing was slate. Guy Lumbardo played in this house for the “Coming Out” party of Dorothy Gayfer with over two hundred invited guests. According to a granddaughter of John Gayfer, the tower was used for learning to smoke! The land and premises were purchased by Louise and John Gayfer (a well-known Ingersoll druggist) in 1881 and remained in the Gayfer family until the 1960s.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
316 Oxford Street – Many of the features of a Tudor style house have been incorporated in this home, including the patterned brick work, interesting chimney treatment, groups of rectangular windows, and complex roof line with many gables. Straight clean lines and design are typical. The home was built in 1937 and given to Harold and Lorna Wilson by his father E.A. Wilson as a wedding present. The Wilson family owned the Ingersoll Machine & Tool Company and were also involved in speed boat racing. In 1939 Harold won the President’s Cup with his craft “Miss Canada”, making the first time in U.S. boat racing history that the cup was won by a foreigner. Harold is included in the Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
189 Thames Street South – The Smith House – James Smith emigrated from Scotland in 1862. Shortly after his arrival in Ingersoll, he married Alice Galliford, daughter of John Galliford, Ingersoll’s first reeve. They moved into this house which was a small one-story cottage at the time. As the family grew to include nine children, a wing was built on the south side which included a kitchen and a dining room. A second story containing five bedrooms was also added. John admired the mansard roof line of the newly completed Niagara District Bank across the street and he incorporated a similar roof line in his second-story addition. When indoor plumbing was added, one of the bedrooms was converted into a bathroom.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
120 Charles Street West – dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
112 Albert Street – two-story frontispiece, iron cresting above entrance door
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
415 Harris Street – Elm Hurst Inn & Spa – 1872 – sidelights and transom windows surrounding double entrance doors, bay window, oriel window, tower, verge board trim on gables

Tavistock and Innerkip and Area in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Tavistock and Innerkip and Area

Tavistock is located 15 kilometers southeast of Stratford and five kilometers south of Shakespeare on County Road 59. In 1848, Captain Henry Eckstein founded Tavistock. The world championship crokinole tournament has been held here annually since 1999.

Innerkip is located on Oxford Road 29 north of Highway 401, northeast of Woodstock.

Huntingford is located on County Road 59, north of Woodstock, west of Innerkip.

Punkeydoodles Corners is located four miles east of Tavistock. Today the corner has a scattering of houses and farms. At one time it was a bustling stop along the Huron Road. The most popular legend about how it got its name is from the song “Yankee Doodle Dandy” which was popular in the 1800s and often sung around the piano at the inn and tavern located at the Corner during the late nineteenth century. Today, the corner is the meeting place of three districts – Oxford County, Perth County and the Region of Waterloo.

Hickson is located at the intersection of Highway 59 and County Road 8, about thirteen kilometers north of Woodstock and ten kilometers south of Tavistock. Hickson was founded in 1876 when the Port Dover and Lake Huron Railway created a whistle-stop here. The new village was named after Sir Joseph Hickson, the general manager of the Grand Trunk Railway.

Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
Tavistock – 52 Woodstock Street South – The Glass Swan – This late Italianate style has existed since 1892 when Dr. Otto Niemeier bricked over two adjoining structures. This residence is one of the oldest remaining in Tavistock and was the location of several early merchants and doctors.
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
#6 – paired cornice brackets under the eaves
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
#18 – Queen Anne style – three-story tower, Doric pillars supporting veranda with pediment
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
28 Hope Street West – hipped roof with dormer, pediment
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
44 Hope Street West – verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
# 45 – Hillcroft – A lovely yellow brick Queen Anne, with an interesting variation of roof pitches; beautiful Neoclassical pillar details
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
Yellow brick, two story – verge board, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
94 William Street – The Maples Home for Seniors – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers, drip molds and keystones, bay window
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
182 Blandford Street – built in 1867 – first owner Charles Vincent – two story frame house with a stone front and a decorative roof with dormers
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
172 Blandford Street – built 1855 – 2 story home with stone foundation, gingerbread trim on the center gable, a porch on each floor. The owners welcomed us, showed their home and shared a picnic lunch with us in their backyard.
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
134 Blandford Street – built 1880 – 2 story yellow brick with red brick corners quoins and red brick above windows, gingerbread trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
132 Coleman Street – Gothic – built 1888 – 2 story stone building, steel roof, verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
Two-story stone building with hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Huntingford, Ontario
Huntingford – Gothic Style, yellow brick, two story
Architectural Photos, Hickson, Ontario
Victorian style, 2 story, bay windows on lower level, yellow brick, balcony above porch, quoining, voussoirs, decorative brickwork
Architectural Photos, Hickson, Ontario
Yellow brick, two-story home with bay windows on each corner, paired cornice brackets under the eaves, hipped roof