October, 2020:

Romanesque Architecture in Ontario – Top 47 Picks

Romanesque Architecture in Ontario

Romanesque Revival, 1880-1910 – This style hearkens back to medieval architecture of the 11th and 12th centuries with a heavy appearance, blocky towers and rounded arches.

Richardsonian Romanesque Revival, 1870-1910 – is a style of Romanesque Revival architecture which incorporates 11th and 12th century southern French, Spanish and Italian Romanesque characteristics. It emphasizes clear, strong picturesque massing, round-headed Romanesque arches which often spring from clusters of short squat columns, recessed entrances, richly varied rustication, blank stretches of walls contrasting with bands of windows, and cylindrical towers with conical caps embedded in the walls.

Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Toronto – Queen’s Park – In 1859 the city leased land from King’s College and in 1860 a park named after Queen Victoria was opened by the Prince of Wales. The main block of the massive Romanesque Revival Parliament Buildings with its towering legislative block was completed in 1892.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 415 Hunter Street – 1892 – County Court House – Richardsonian Romanesque style -2½ story, rose sandstone with white sandstone lintels and drip molding, steep pitch irregular slate roof, wall dormers with parapet walls topped with finial, semi-circular windows above double hung windows, recessed double doors, framed with Roman arch, supported by pillars, two pillars have carved monkey heads, 2,2 story semi-circular bay windows, large stone newel posts flank stairs, towers, turrets and elaborate chimneys, Centenary stone mounted in the central buttress
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 1 – The Arlington Hotel, 106 Grand River Street North – c. 1850s, 1888 – 4-storey stucco and yellow brick reminiscent of the Chateau style, Romanesque style arcades supported by red-brown marble columns at the street level, octagonal tower, arched and rectangular window
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 1 – 212 Barrie Street – In 1890, Chalmers Free Presbyterian Church was planned at the triangle of land formed by Barrie, Clergy and Earl Streets. The Union of the Congregational Church, Methodist Church and Presbyterian Church took place in 1925, electing to join Chalmers. Romanesque Revival style – rounded windows, rose window and quatrefoil windows, tower
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 320 King Street – The impressive Romanesque style limestone structure which now houses the library was built in 1913 as Midland’s first post office, with customs and excise offices on the second floor. – mansard roof, high central gable, imposing corner porch, and tower; 2½ story building composed of even course cut stone, with a belt course that goes around the entire building; metal roof has a decorative stone fascia; some semi-elliptical windows, and a corner entrance. In 1963 the post office, needing more space, moved to its new home on Dominion Avenue and the beautiful limestone building sat empty for three years. In 1967, the library moved to the old post office. Setting your watch by the clock tower would be inadvisable as the four faces do not always agree.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1401 Queen Street West – Romanesque Style – circa 1899 – This house, built for members of the Algie family, is clad in the same imported red brick as that used at #1414 across the street. The house has a double arched entry with intricate brickwork detailing and terracotta hood (or drip) molds above the entry and windows; three symmetrical and identical roof gables face north, east and west. Dr. James Algie lived here and kept a horse and buggy in the carriage house to the rear for visiting patients.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Aylmer Book 2 – 46 Talbot Street West – Aylmer Town Hall and Municipal Offices – clock tower, dormers, cupola, arched window voussoirs – built in 1913 in Romanesque style
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 1 – 201 Church Street – St. Thomas Anglican Church – 1870s – Traditional Norman-style (Romanesque) church, joined to a modern glass-enveloped Parish Centre – rounded windows with muntins, quoining, buttresses, finials, beveled dentil molding
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville – 144 King Street East – Armouries – stone – 1900 – Romanesque style – battlement parapet, stone string courses
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fort Erie – 575 Central Avenue – This former church, now called The Bell Tower has been repurposed to provide a place for meetings. In the Main Event Room is the venue for comedy shows, live bands and Karaoke for kids and adults.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville -165 King Street East – Romanesque style, tower, Palladian window in gable with cornice return, large decorative chimney, round window arch, circular window, open pediment, enclosed veranda
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Goderich – 52 Montreal Street – Goderich Public Library was opened in 1903 as a Carnegie library. It is in the Romanesque Revival style with the large round tower, the round-headed windows, and the irregular roof.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cornwall – 28 Second Street East – St. John’s Presbyterian Church – 1888 – Romanesque style – dentil molding, trefoil decoration on tower
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – Centenary United Church, 24 Main Street West – 1868 – In the Victorian Romanesque style; buttresses, corbelled dentils
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 3 – 212 Barrie Street – Intersection of Barrie, Clergy and Earl Streets – Chalmers United Church – 1890 – Romanesque style, rose windows, quatrefoils, rounded tower, columns with Corinthian capitals
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 4 – 110 Sydenham Street (corner of Johnson) – First Baptist Church – Romanesque style, voussoirs with keystones, columns surrounding doorways
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 4 – Queen’s Theological Hall – Romanesque style – limestone – four-story tower, Corinthian pillars surrounding entrance
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 6 – Ordnance Street – Institute of the Sisters of Charity – House of Providence – 1838 – Romanesque style, Jacobean gable, crenelated roof line, finials, Buttresses, quatrefoils – Its heritage is rooted in the creativity and spirituality of Vincent de Paul and Louise de Marillac, in the willingness of Emilie Gamelin to risk and trust in Providence, in the responsiveness of the Montreal Sisters of Providence to the call of Bishop E.J. Horan, the ecclesiastical founder, and in the courage and pioneer spirit of Catherine McKinley, the first general superior and proclaimed Kingston foundress, and the original members of the Kingston community
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Merrickville – 206 Main Street East – Percival House (Ardcaven) – c. 1890 – Richardsonian-Romanesque style – home of foundry-man Roger Percival – heavy stone arch around door, decorative chimney, two-story bay window topped with open pediment, dormer, tower, stone courses
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 1265 Wyld Street – St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church – It is in the Romanesque style with the heavy massing achieved through the use of local cut stone, round headed arches over most openings, and the twin towers. This is the first French Roman Catholic church constructed in North Bay. It was built in 1914 by Henri Marceau with the help of local parishioners. The original building was a simple basement with a low tin embossed ceiling. In 1932, a new superstructure was designed by B. A. Jones Architects from Kitchener, Ontario, which was built over the existing structure. The commanding hilltop on which the church is built establishes this building as a visual landmark in the immediate community.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 283 Broadway – Romanesque – massive shape, tower on side and front, large arches over windows
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 95 Somerset Street West at corner of Cartier Street – St. Theresa’s Roman Catholic Church – 1933 – Romanesque Revival
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 164 Grand River Street North – Paris Presbyterian Church – Romanesque Revival design built in 1893 – turrets, conical towers, round stained glass rose window, terracotta detailing
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Penetanguishene – 28 Robert Street West – St. Ann’s Catholic Church – positioned to overlook the town and the bay – constructed with limestone between 1886 and 1902; it serves a bilingual Catholic community with services held in French and English – Romanesque style
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 690 Queen Street East/107 East Street – Sault Ste. Marie Museum – The Old Post Office is an imposing three story red brick and stone building featuring a clock tower. It is prominently located in downtown Sault Ste. Marie at the intersection of Queen Street East and East Street. Built between 1902 and 1906 as a federal building, it was purchased in 1982 by the City for use as the Sault Ste. Marie Museum. It is a fine example of turn of the century Federal architecture in Ontario, combining Victorian classicism with excellent workmanship. Exterior elements include classical pediments, pilasters and cornices, Romanesque stone arches with Italianate detailing and decorative features. Inside there is an oak staircase, an exquisite three-story light well and skylight, and a plated glass floor.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 – 220 Murray Street – Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment Peterborough Garrison – Central Park was an ideal site for a military training area with its expansive grounds and location – accessible by foot, horse and wagon. A drill shed was built in 1867 and used for bank practices, dances and military activities. Drill sheds were built in many communities across Canada after the Fenian Raids of 1866. The shed was destroyed by fire in 1909, just before the Peterborough Armoury was opened on May 24. The Armoury was built during a nation-wide spending program for the militia in response to the Boer War. The Armoury included a parade hall, living quarters for infantry, cavalry, and artillery, a firing range, and a bowling alley. The Peterborough Armouries were built in the Romanesque style with turrets, arched troop doors, and crenelated roof line.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 –Peterborough Collegiate circa 1917 – McDonnel Street – Romanesque Revival architecture
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – Petrolia Line – Romanesque, three-story turret, decorative iron railing on second floor balcony
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 380 King Street – The only example of Romanesque Revival in Port Colborne, this home was built about 1907 for Thomas Euphronius Reeb. The Romanesque is shown in its dark red brick and heavy cut stone window sills and lintels. The Queen Anne influence is evident in the octagonal tower with lard “band shell” verandah, wide round-arched first floor window with etched leaded glass and a line of terracotta tiles with egg and dart motif under the eaves.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 2 – 1001 Firelane No. 1 – The William Brown House – Established in 1898 by Frank Fulton Brown and the Dann brothers, the Lorraine Summer resort was located on almost one kilometer of fine sandy beach and named for the Brown’s daughter. The structure is a timber frame construction with large, pillar-like stone protrusions on both the front and rear of the building. The cut limestone used is the same as that used to construct the entrance gate pillars on Lorraine Road. The peaked gable ends and the arches above the windows indicate the work of a master stonemason. The architecture is reminiscent of the Richardsonian Romanesque style of architecture.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 28 Bedford Street – This large 2½ story four bay brick house is built in the Romanesque Revival style with a large irregular plan, heavy masonry, steeply pitched roof, tall chimneys, recessed porch, and oriel windows. The imposing entrance way is composed of a shingled pediment and round arches of corbelled and stepped brick with decorative panels on either side of corbelled brick.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 131 Walton Street – St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church – c. 1906 – This is brick over a cast stone base and, essentially, of the Romanesque Revival style. Massive towers frame the front with an arcaded porch between sheltering the tower entrances and above, the gabled front to the sanctuary and its rear gallery. Windows to towers display simple stained glass in Art Nouveau designs, the taller west tower with louvered openings to the bell stage and with a short spire above. The shorter east tower has a hipped roof. The chimney is a massive shaft very much contributing to the architectural silhouette. A fine rose window, also exhibiting Art Nouveau designs, dominates the front gable but lights only the loft space above the sanctuary. Brickwork has ornamentation in hood molds over windows, a corbelled frieze and pilasters.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 75 Huron Street – Consolidated Lake Superior Company General Office Building (now St. Marys Paper Inc.) – built at the turn of the century in Richardsonian Romanesque industrial architecture with round arched openings and massive rough faced masonry
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Seaforth – 52 Main Street – Post Office – Romanesque Revival architecture with square center clock tower and round-headed windows. It was built from 1911-1913. There are dormers in the rooftop.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smiths Falls – 30 Russell Street East – old Post Office – Romanesque style – designed by Thomas Fuller, Dominion Architect, in 1894; clock was added in 1915 – local red sandstone on a foundation of Beckwith limestone with stone trim from Nova Scotia
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 – 95 Church Street – First United Church was constructed in 1877 in the Lombard Romanesque style of architecture which is characterized by a gable roof across the front of the church and a projecting entrance. It has rounded arches for doors and window openings. Four detailed buttresses rise up as towers, each supporting a small metal spire. The twelve-petal stained glass rose window is a prominent feature on the front facade. It is now known as Royal House Redeemed Christian Church of God.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 -99 Ontario Street – St. Thomas Church – 1879 – Richardson Romanesque style with four story tower and a two-story tower, rose window
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 1 – 13 Main Street South – Sunnyside – c. 1888 – was constructed by Dr. E.E. Kitchen. It was the heartbeat of Main Street. It was the home of the inaugural meeting of the St. George Women’s Institute, January 13, 1903. This Romanesque Revival mansion was built as a residence and doctor’s office. On the third floor there was a ballroom.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 2 – 175 Queen Street East – St. Mary’s Town Hall – This Romanesque Revival building was built in 1901 of local limestone with red sandstone as the contrasting elements for window arches and checkerboard effects in the facade. The massive entrances on the south and west facades of the building and the two towers on the south add to its lasting beauty. Due to its prominent location on the north side of the main street, and dominating as it does the sky-line of the Town, it plays an important role in the character of the downtown area.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stratford – Perth County Court House, St. Andrew Street – opened May 9, 1887 – High Victorian architecture with terracotta details – It combines bi-chromal (multi-colored) masonry and a variety of building materials with features from different architectural styles. Italianate brackets adorn the cornice, while several Queen Anne features include the medieval tower, molded brick chimneys, and small multiple-paned windows. Several features of the Romanesque Revival style include the round arch windows stretching over two stories, the heavy doors, the contrasting masonry surfaces, the rusticated basement foundation, the wall dormers which peak with a gable at the top, the pinnacle placed off center, Romanesque motifs adorning the soffits, and miniature columns complete with capitals which embellish the arched windows on the front and side facades. The soffits of the cornice immediately above the terracotta panel are adorned with an intricate rose and maple leaf pattern.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay – Port Arthur Book 1 – 294 Red River Road – St. Andrew’s Roman Catholic Church, A.D. 1924, is traditional with its longitudinal plan and Romanesque style details. The windows and doors have round arches with stone label surrounds. Stepped buttresses in pairs project from the corners of the building and from the four-story central projecting tower with ornamental crenelations. The tower has a pyramidal roof and rises 117 feet and is topped with a cross. Along the sides of the church, there are buttresses with a large window between each pair. The large window above the main entrance in the tower is elaborated with many circles above the four rounded-arch windows included within the same framework. The stain glass repeats the circular motif with crosses.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 35 King Street North – Post Office built 1911-1913 – Romanesque style – rusticated sandstone on ground floor and around upper floor windows; red brick for upper floors; semicircular arches for windows and entrance ways (lowest level); on the top story, a steeply sloped copper-clad face over two corbelled courses of stone, and tall, stone dormers below a flat roof; corner clock tower with pediment
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 3 – 2879 Riverside Drive East – Our Lady of the Rosary Church – built 1907-1913 – Romanesque-style brick and stone building could hold about 1,000 people, features two domed bell towers
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – 285 Dundas Street – 1889 – Dundas Street United Church – Ornate Romanesque style – In the front of the church is an immense arch resting on brown buttresses flanked on either side by a massive tower. The arch encloses a spacious porch which is approached by a set of steps the full width of the opening. There is artistic detail in the red brick and credit valley brown stone design in the cornices and molding.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 1 – Finkle Street – The Oxford Hotel, located across from Market Square and the Town Hall in Woodstock was built in 1880 as “The O’Neill House” in Romanesque style. It saw guests such as Oscar Wilde and Reginald Birchall.
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 210 Vansittart Avenue – built in 1895 by Thomas Leopold “Carbide” Wilson, inventor of the first commercial calcium-carbide process for the manufacturer of acetylene gas. It was the residence of the Sisters of St. Joseph’s until 1975. It is a voluptuous two-story house with finished attic of irregular shape in Richardsonian Romanesque style using contrasting brick, cut stone and hanging tiles – stone main floor, red brick second floor; steep red slate roof, red tiles in gable end and small casement windows, several balconies, large shed roof verandah, brick posts, turned balusters, lattice skirt, a porte-cochere for people to be protected from weather when leaving buggy or cars, off-set tower
Romanesque Architectural Photos, Ontario
Curries – Wesley Memorial Church erected A.D. 1891 – Romanesque style – beveled dentil molding

Edwardian Architecture in Ontario – Top 42 Picks

Edwardian Architecture in Ontario

Edwardian, 1900-1930 – This style bridges the ornate and elaborate styles of the Victorian era and the simplified styles of the 20th century. Edwardian Classicism provided simple, balanced facades, simple roof lines, dormer windows, large front porches, and smooth brick surfaces. Voussoirs and keystones are used sparingly and are understated. Finials and cresting are absent. Cornice brackets and braces are block-like and openings have flat arches or plain stone lintels.

Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford – 126 King Street – Post Office – A.D. 1914 – Two-story smooth red brick structure has ashlar stone lintels and string courses at the window liens. It is sometimes called Edwardian in style because it was built during the reign of King Edward VII. The clock tower is a landmark for the business district.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dunnville Book 1 – 241 Broad Street West – The Lalor Estate is a two-and-a-half-story residence with a four-gable roof and a wraparound veranda with fluted columns. This Edwardian structure was built in 1905. Its builder was Francis Ramsey Lalor, a prominent Dunnville businessman, politician, philanthropist, and entrepreneur. His business interests included two dry goods stores, a grocery store, an apple evaporator, natural gas wells, the F.R. Lalor Canning Factories, the F.R. Lalor Ashes Company, and the Monarch Knitting Mills. The exterior walls are red brick. There is a two-story bay window, Tudor-style timbering in the gable, a pediment above the entrance with a decorative tympanum, and sidelights beside the front door.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smithville – 121 West Street – Edwardian – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 50 Albert Street – 1903 – Snyder-Seagram House – Edwardian Classical in parged concrete – superposed sets of Palladian windows and bay windows projecting over both stories; curved, wraparound verandah with classical columns
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 331 Centre Street South
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1460 Queen Street West – circa 1900 – This 1½ story frame house with the ‘clipped’ center gable end to the street has a west facing dormer window more typical of Edwardian Classical style. The house was built after the 1898 Alton fire insurance map was printed. The house has been cladded with a modern brick veneer with contrasting brickwork trim made to resemble the Victorian Gothic style of the neighboring Mechanics Institute.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – Edwardian – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Galt Book 1 (Cambridge) – 54 Blenheim Road – Edwardian style with Palladian window in gable
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Preston (Cambridge) – 519 Queenston Road – Italianate/ Edwardian style, Palladian window in gable
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Chatsworth – Edwardian
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Chesley – #140 – Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 1 – 135 King Street West – 1902 – William Academy – Now a private school, this building was formerly the home of Cobourg Collegiate. Many men from the town who served in WW1 attended high school here and some of them returned to finish their studies after their time at the front. Built in 1902 in a style known as Edwardian Classical, the building features oversized Palladian windows on the second level which add drama to its front facade. Additions to the school building were made in 1939 and during the 1960s, but in 2015 the collegiate moved to a new facility on King Street East.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Conestogo – Edwardian – 2 story tower-like bay, fretwork, Romanesque style window arches, 2nd floor balcony, cobblestone basement
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 82 Sydenham Street – Edwardian style – palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton and Bolton Book – Bolton – 56 Sterne Street – circa 1900 – This ‘four square’ red brick house is built in the Edwardian Classical style, characterized by an asymmetric floor plan, attic dormer window, full front verandah with classical column supports and pyramidal hipped roof. For many years into the 1960s, it was the home of Mrs. Alice Goodfellow and her twin sister Miss Monkman.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ingersoll Book 1 – 181 Oxford Street – This cement block house was built for R.A. Skinner who owned and operated Skinner’s Livery on the north side of Charles Street at the Oxford corner. Stained-glass panel on first floor window; pediment above porch with Doric pillars; a lion on either side of the front steps. This home was the scene of many elaborate house parties, the form of entertainment that made up the fabric of social life of the times. The Skinner Livery, sometimes referred to as the Bon Ton Livery, maintained vehicles for pleasure driving, business trips, weddings, funerals, etc.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kitchener Book 1 – 132 Water Street – Edwardian style with dormer in attic, balcony above the verandah
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 1 – 427 King Street – 1902 – medium gabled roof with a half-round window; gingerbread trim on fascia; exterior is cedar shingles and stretcher brick; brick voussoirs and window shutters; transom window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Midland Book 2 – Hugel Avenue – Edwardian – Palladian window, pediment above pillared veranda with open railing
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Mount Pleasant – 1229 Highway 54 – Edwardian, Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
North Bay – 200 First Avenue West – Former Normal School/Teacher’s College opened in 1909 with an enrollment of 25 students and continued in operation until 1972. This design is exemplary of the architectural influence of the Edwardian style. The observatory-like dome, the elaborate cornices and the formal entrance are three main characteristics of the building.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 1 – 6 York Street – Edwardian style – corner quoins, paired cornice brackets, triangular pediment supported by columns
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 65 Broadway – Edwardian Classicism – large triangular front gable with Palladian window and shallow roofed porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 3 – 27 Zina – Edwardian Classicism built in 1923 with large triangular front gable with Palladian window and shallow roofed porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 12 Cartier Street – Edwardian – voussoirs above stained glass window, cornice brackets, Palladian window in gable, and Ionic capitals on porch pillars with balcony above
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 18 Banfield Street – Edwardian style – Palladian window, turret extending through the roof
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 50 Herriot Street – Kininvie (means where my family lives) was built of reddish sandstone in 1906 for textile manufacturer Thomas A. Code – grand Edwardian – said to have been heated by steam from the factory across the street
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 232 Clarence Street – Built by lawyer Louis Kinnear in 1904, it was the home of his daughter Judge Helen Kinnear from 1904-1943, the year she became the first federally appointed woman judge in Canada and the Commonwealth. Helen Kinnear was also the first woman in the Commonwealth to be granted in 1934, “King’s Council,” a distinction given to noteworthy lawyers. She was also the first woman lawyer to appear before the Supreme Court of Canada. The house exhibits a combination of Edwardian and Victorian architectural styles.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Elgin Book 2 – Yellow brick – Edwardian – two-and-a-half story tower-like bay with projecting eaves and large fretwork pieces resembling brackets – matching fretwork piece over lower window to left of porch and below porch roof
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 1 – 126 Walton Street – Wilson-Benson House – c. 1885 – This two and a half story brick house is built in the Queen Anne Revival style with an offset tower, a broad verandah, and a steeply pitched roof. The gable on the Walton Street facade is sheathed in decorative shingle. The tower is five-sided with a conical roof topped by a finial and contains a long window on each story of each wall surface. The large main floor window is Edwardian in treatment with colored glass in the semi-circular transom section. For fifty years, the Wilsons were publishers of the Port Hope Guide.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 91-93 Mill Street North – Deyell Terrace – c. 1890 – 91 and 93 Mill Street are, respectively, the south and middle sections of a row of three attached related buildings. The two-bay, two story houses are constructed of brick laid in garden wall bond. The roof is of medium pitch with a front gable containing a decorative finial. The doorways are in a projecting frontispiece and are composed of paired doors containing long round-headed windows with square panels below. A transom with one dividing muntin is contained above. The windows in the projecting frontispiece below the gable are Edwardian in style with segmental stained-glass transoms above two vertically divided panes. A small mainly decorative round-headed louvered window is placed below the gable.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 2 – 223 George Street – 1900 – Edwardian – Palladian window, wraparound verandah supported by pillars, pediment with decorated tympanum, dentil molding
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 1048 Queen Street East – This residence is situated on a large treed lot at the south west corner of Queen Street East and Upton Road in the east end of the central residential core. William Howard Hearst established a legal practice in Sault Ste. Marie in 1888 and in 1904 built “Eastbourne” as his residence, naming it for its location in the east end of town. In 1908 Hearst became the Member of Provincial Parliament for Algoma and in 1914 the first Premier of Ontario from Northern Ontario. Eastbourne is a good example of Edwardian architecture using local materials. It was constructed in 1904 with a ‘t-shaped’ plan; each of the arms are the same width and projection. Two-stories in height with a full basement and attic, it is constructed of soft red brick and local red sandstone. It has a gabled roof and the attic gables are clad with painted wood shingles. The deep cornice and soffits have decorative brackets. Large bow windows dominate the east and west facades. The sash windows are triple and double hung. The porch has a broken pediment, pilasters and triple clusters of truncated Doric columns. The basement and porch foundations are of local red sandstone.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 2 – 339 Glen Morris Road East – Edwardian, Palladian window
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stouffville Book 1 – 2 Albert Street – Built c. 1895 for James McConnachie, the Manager of the Toronto Fruit and Vinegar Works – two stories, Edwardian style (board and batten addition)
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay (Port Arthur Book 2) – 27 Cumberland Street South – In 1909, land was purchased by Molson Company in downtown Port Arthur to build a bank. The three-story building had offices on the second floor and bank manager’s quarters on the third floor, and featured a beautiful exterior made of limestone mined from the Rossport area. Molson’s bank opened in 1912 and did banking business with families of loggers, miners, shippers, and prospectors of the Port Arthur area. The architecture style is Edwardian Classicism. Prominent features of the building include the rusticated stone on the ground-floor walls and large keystones. Doric columns surround the main entrance and there is a heavy string course between the first and second stories. In 1954, the building was sold to the Bank of Montreal which operated here until 1984.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay (Fort William Book 2) – 121 McKellar Street South – Built in 1907 for owner Thomas P. Kelley, a local merchant, the house was later sold to Dr. R. Kerr Dewar who had fought in the First World War, returned home to study medicine and purchased this home in 1920. The first floor was converted to a medical clinic in 1928. The building is a good example of Edwardian Classicism. It has metal cresting on one of the dormer windows. The first and second floors both have distinctive Palladian windows with prominent keystones. On the front facade, the centrally placed wood covered porch is supported by brick piers. There is a two-story bay window.
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 2 – 44 Baldwin Street – c. 1914 – 2½ story frame residential building in the Edwardian Classic style, brick cladding, hip gable roof, L-shape with a wing projecting from the main block gable end to the street, a flat-roofed verandah with open porch above
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 1 – 841 Kildare Road – Miers-Fraser House built 1904 – Edwardian, Palladian window, two-story bay, Ionic columns supporting a pediment
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 849 Victoria Avenue – 1907 – Edwardian – rounded bay, flared eaves, a columned porch with pediment, dormer, hipped roof, red brick with stone trim
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 376 Drew Street – c. 1852 – Edwardian – L shape two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof with one gable dormer and one gable both with green painted shingles in a pattern, gable end has Palladian window with decorated cornice in apex, center door is protected by square piers, open porch
Edwardian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 155 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1860s – Edwardian – symmetrical two story with attic, painted wood siding with decorative shingles between floors, steep hip roof, gable dormer, deep cornice and dentils, 1-over-1 rectangular windows with Palladian center window, centered door with rectangular transom, cement platform porch

Georgian Architecture in Ontario – Top 39 Picks

Georgian Architecture in Ontario

Georgian, before 1860 – This style began with the British King Georges in the 18th century. These buildings have balanced facades around a central door, medium-pitched gable roofs, and small-paned windows.

Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – 477 Main Street – Rockwood Academy – Georgian style – three-story stone building with limestone walls, rough-cut quoins, symmetrical five-bay facade with double-hung six-over-six wood sash windows with a central door with a portico and a transom window and sidelights. Low-pitched cedar-shingle gable roof with many small brick and stone chimneys – The owner’s bedrooms still exist on the second floor, as do the students’ bedrooms on the third floor. The south wing still contains the classroom below the student bedrooms. The west wing remains unaltered and contains a carriage house on the ground floor with a gymnasium above.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – Wilson Street – Township Hall – constructed in 1871, a stone building in the Georgian style of architecture with a Neo-Classical portico and an Italianate cupola.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Caledonia – 80 Caithness Street East – formerly Caledonia Town Hall – 1856 – Classical Georgian design – pediment above front entrance, pilasters, dentil molding below cornice, cupola on roof, arched window voussoirs and keystones
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Amherstburg Book 1 – 525 Dalhousie Street – Bellevue House – 1816-1819 – One of the finest remaining examples of domestic Georgian Neo-Classical architecture in Ontario – the home of Robert Reynolds, the commissary to the garrison at Fort Malden, and his sister, Catherine Reynolds, an accomplished landscape painter who worked in pencil, crayon, sepia wash and water colors recording scenes along the Detroit River and Lake Erie
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grimsby – 126 Main Street West – Nelles Manor is a historic home completed in 1798 by Colonel Robert Nelles, a Loyalist from the Mohawk Valley, New York. The house is considered to be the oldest inhabited dwelling between Niagara and Kingston. It was built in the Georgian style of locally quarried stone over a ten-year period (1788-98). Built facing north and Lake Ontario on an old path called Squire Nelles’ Lane, the main entrance was later moved to the south on the other side, with a pillared porch facing on to the new Stone Road (now Main Street). The Neo-Classical portico was added in the early 1820s. This home served as Nelles’ residence during his lengthy career as Justice of the Peace, Member of the Legislative Assembly and Commander of the 14th Lincoln Militia. Colonel Nelles’ office was a small room on the north side, where he performed many marriages before clergy were available. The house was a center for gala events and remained in the Nelles family possession until 1963. It has seven fireplaces, walnut woodwork and spacious halls and rooms. Originally a private residence, it was turned into a museum in 2016 and is now open to the public.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 19767 Main Street – Agnes and John S. Meek House – circa 1853 – This two-story Georgian style house with roughcast exterior and massive return eaves is one of Alton’s earliest homes. John Meek, a merchant and hotel owner, was named Alton’s first postmaster in 1854 and this house became the post office. After his death in 1866, Agnes Meek was appointed postmistress, followed in 1876 by their son James who served until 1883. The Meek’s son Thomas owned the house until 1950.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 1 – 42 Cross Street – Georgian style architecture
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burford – 55 Maple Avenue North – Stuart House – 1886 – was built by Elijah Stuart in the Georgian Symmetry style with Italianate features, segmental arched windows, double brackets under the eaves and quoining on the corners. The double-hung front door has a fanlight and the second-floor door has a keystone arch linking the same color detail line across the front of the house.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Galt Book 1 (Cambridge Book 1) – 1 Brant Road North – Georgian style, dormers in attic, Italianate style veranda with pillars
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
York – 39 Front Street South – The Enniskillen Lodge, formerly the Barber Hotel, was built in 1862 for Mr. Daniel Barber, a prominent local hotelier. Large Georgian style windows, doors, and brick detailing are spaced and designed symmetrically. It has a projected cornice with dentils, Regency four-panel door with sidelights and rectangular transom, hood molds over windows, horizontal banding, and corner quoins.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cobourg Book 5 – 10 Chapel Street – c. 1841 – This house has Georgian features – balanced facade, medium-pitched roof, and robust end chimneys. Its rather heavy and severe doorway, with its single panel, is characteristic of the Greek Revival style.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton – 136 Old Danforth Road – Grover House – This two-story (white with dark green shutters) symmetrical designed house with central front door typifies the Georgian style. It was built in c. 1822 by John Grover, an early (1798) settler from Grafton Massachusetts. The hamlet was named after his home town. The original windows would have had 9 over 9, small glass panes. The replacement windows and white cedar clapboard are probably from around 1900. The clapboard still covers the original cedar shingle siding. John Grover gave the land, across from his house, to the Presbyterian Church, now United Church.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Guelph Book 1 – 21 Stuart Street – Georgian style, belvedere, window voussoirs with keystones, portico
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 4 – 43 Inglewood Drive – Georgian style, dormers, balcony
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Merrickville – 905 St. Lawrence Street – The Aaron Merrick House – built in 1844 of local stone with refined stone window surrounds and oversized stone quoins for the son of the founder of Merrick’s Mills – Georgian style with distinct Neo-classical detailing; dormers; semi-elliptical fanlight with sidelights frame a door found within a pedimented portico that is light and elegant
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 3 – 12549 Niagara Parkway – Danner House Bed and Breakfast – It was built in 1805 by American immigrant Ulrich Strickler, after moving from Pennsylvania in 1801. It is a stone building with a stucco finish in an early Loyalist Georgian style. The Danner-Sherk House is a solid construction of stone with a white stucco finish, four irregularly spaced bays across the front and a low-pitched roof. The house has the original front entry including the side lights, six-panel door and wood paneling in the door recess. During the War of 1812, his crops and supplies were taken by American troops leaving him with little for survival. Later the house was occupied by the British. After the war in 1816, the house was sold to Joseph Danner, a Quaker from Pennsylvania who moved to Canada in 1807. Danner owned the property from 1816 until 1847; during this period, he reconstructed sections of the home and continued to farm the land. The house was again occupied by troops during the 1837-1838 rebellion as were most homes during this time.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara-on-the-Lake Book 1 – 209 Queen Street – The Charles Inn c. 1832 – Georgian style – The house was constructed in 1832 by Charles Richardson, a barrister and Member of Parliament. He used the house as his principle residence and later as his summer house. The verandahs and servant’s wing on the east side of the house were added in the end of the last century.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oakville – 1835 – David Patterson, Shipbuilder – #19 – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Orangeville Book 2 – 63 Broadway – James Graham – Tavern Keeper c. 1852 – Greystones Inn – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oshawa Book 1 – Centre Street South – Georgian style, dormers
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Paris Book 2 – 59-61 Banfield Street – Georgian – two-story frontispiece with pediment
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Parry Sound – 10 Gibson Street – Bayside Inn
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Perth – 66 Craig Street – Inge-Va (a Tamil word meaning “come here”) Museum – local sandstone house – 1824 – Colonial Georgian style of an Ontario cottage – balanced facade, sidelights and transom
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Peterborough Book 3 – 404 Belmont Avenue – Georgian, dormers in attic
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 21 Dorset Street East – John David Smith House (The Bluestone) – c. 1834 – The two-story house is rectangular in plan. The basement is of random rubble and the four end chimneys are brick. The style of the house is Greek Revival. Although the symmetry and the rectangular plan are typical of the Georgian style, much of the exterior and interior detail is definitely Greek in derivation. The house is well-proportioned and balanced with nine windows on the main and rear facades and six windows on the west end (one false).
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 4 – 314 Vidal Street North – Georgian, pillared entrance with curved pediment, dentil molding, decorative cornice, voussoirs and keystones, sidelights and transom window
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sault Ste. Marie – 831 Queen Street East – The Ermatinger Old Stone House is a two-story stone structure built on the north bank of the St. Mary’s River near the rapids in Sault Ste. Marie. The house provides a link to Sault Ste. Marie’s role in the fur trade and to one of its earliest settlers. Charles Oakes Ermatinger, a member of a prominent Montreal family who joined the Northwest Company and married Charlotte Katawabeda, the daughter of the Paramount Chief of the Ojibway, built the house in 1812-1814 of local red sandstone in a style characteristic of vernacular Georgian architecture but employed Quebec construction techniques. The house quickly became the center of government in the northwest part of the province and of the business and social life of the district. It later served as the first courthouse, a post office and a hotel. The house served as the headquarters of Sir Garnet Wolseley in 1870 when the expedition he commanded stopped at Sault Ste. Marie enroute to quell the Red River Rebellion and to establish Canadian sovereignty over Manitoba and the Northwest Territories.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 109 Norfolk Street South – Eva Brook Donly Museum – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Southampton – Walker House – a popular meeting place for food and spirits since 1915 – Georgian style – 146 High Street – a historic hotel in the village since the 1860s
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Southwest Oxford Township – Delmer – Brownsville Road
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines, Book 4 – 101 King Street – former Court House – Georgian style – 1848-1849 – The visible James and King Street facades are of channeled Queenston ashlars while the concealed west and north walls are constructed with a course rubble limestone and brick, respectively. The front facade has a tower with a three-faced striking clock and is topped by an octagonal cupola. The clock continues to chime with the assistance of the original weights which extend from the clock tower to the first floor. The entrance to the building is carved in stone like the town hall in Perugia, Italy. It features upright balustrades which conform to the slope of the stairway. The supporting columns under the copings on each side are individually carved to fit its specific location. The northeast wing cut-stone addition to the original structure was built in 1865 to accommodate the County offices and courthouse.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 2 – 129 Oakland Road – Built by Mordecai Westbrook, a member of one of the original families of Oakland. Georgian style with original double hung six over six windows and shutters. The walls are triple-bricked with bricks said to have been made on site. The widow’s walk and rear stone coach house are both original.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stoney Creek – The Nash-Jackson House was originally located at the north-east corner of King Street East and Nash Road in Hamilton. The house was built in 1818 in the Georgian style. The house was moved to Stoney Creek Battlefield Park in 1999.
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln (Jordan) – 3812 Main Street, Jordan Station – Georgian style – curved pediment above door
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 2 – 39 Main Street North – Former Commercial Hotel Building and Property – Hobby Horse Arms – c. 1868 – Georgian style
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterford – Georgian – six-over-six windows, Doric pillars, widow’s walk on rooftop, sidelights and transom window around door
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 3 – 20 Menno Street – Conrad Fenner, carpenter and joiner, built his own wood frame house in 1867; he enlarged his 1½ story home to a full 2 stories in 1886 – Georgian style, pediment above entrance, fluted half columns, cornice brackets, granite field stone foundation
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 942 Victoria Avenue – Georgian with eyebrow window in roof, pillared entrance with rounded pediment
Georgian Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 3 – 447 Hunter Street – 1913 – Neo-Georgian architecture, Neo-Classical door – symmetrical two story, red brick, once Presbyterian manse, parapet ends on gable roof, decorative stone keystone and stone

Gothic Architecture in Ontario – Top 36 Picks

Gothic Architecture in Ontario

Gothic Revival, 1830-1890 – These decorative buildings have sharply-pitched gables with highly detailed verge boards, pointed-arch window openings, and dichromatic brickwork. It is a common style in Ontario.

Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ajax, Pickering Book – 1709 Highway 7 Road, Brougham – The Former Commercial Hotel in Brougham, Ontario is a two-story brick building in the Gothic Revival style with a gable roof and has pointed arched windows in two dormers with finials and decorative wood fascia. It was initially built as a home and then converted into a hotel.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 301 Centre Street South – c. 1875 – built for William Hood, a retired Whitby farmer and son of an English settler – rubble-stone foundation, white clapboard building, two-story vernacular Gothic Revival
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ancaster – 117 Wilson Street West – c. 1855 – Gothic Revival, two-story red brick house, verge board trim and finials on gables, corner quoins, bay windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dundas Book 2 – 63-65 Sydenham Street – three gable Gothic Revival Style, finials on gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cheltenham – 14376 Creditview Road – Frederick Haines House – circa 1887 -After losing his first home to the 1887 fire, entrepreneur Frederick Haines, son of Cheltenham’s founder, built this red brick house with intricate yellow brick patterning. Later additions are compatible with the original three gable Victorian Gothic style. In the 1940s-1950s, it became a United Church rest and holiday home. It later housed an antique shop before being converted back to a private residence. It has a bell cast roof over each front bay, an arched entry and etched glass transom and sidelights of the central entrance.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Burlington – 2201 Lakeshore Road – Gothic Revival, corner quoins, triple gables, keystones and voussoirs, transom window above double front door
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Alton – 1581 Queen Street East – Archibald Dick House – circa 1875 -Hotelier Archibald Dick built this very elaborate Victorian Gothic style red brick house with contrasting yellow brick patterning, symmetrical projecting front bays, paired double windows, intricate fretwork and Italianate influenced paired brackets. The house has ten rooms.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Belleville Book 1 – 169 Front Street – Town Hall – designed by local architect John D. Evans and built in 1872-73 by contractor John Forin in High Victorian Gothic Revival style – brick and limestone building with tall lancet windows on the second floor with mullions dividing the windows in two with simple tracery in the arches, a bell-cast mansard roof with dormers, a massive 144-foot clock tower with octagonal buttresses, four large illuminated clock faces and cast iron railings and weather vanes
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt – 22 Blenheim Road – 1½ story Gothic Revival house with large dormers in the attic
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Dorchester – 15 Bridge Street – The Signpost – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Elmira – 80 Arthur Street South – Gothic Revival, verge board trim
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Erin – 202 Main Street – Gothic Revival – late 1800s – verge board trim and finials on gables, bay window, corner quoins, dichromatic brickwork
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton Bolton Book – Bolton – 25 Nancy Street – Alice Goodfellow House – circa 1884 – This 1½ story Victorian Gothic home was built by George Watson for Alice Goodfellow using local red and yellow brick. The end gable patterning and the enclosed front porch are excellent examples of late nineteenth century urban architecture. Alice’s sister Margaret Smith lived next door. On Alice’s death in 1901, her brother-in-law Albion farmer James Goodfellow and his wife Marion retired here. It was in their family until the owner of 31 Nancy Street purchased it in 1999.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 1 – 88 Fennell Avenue West -Auchmar Estate – Main house named after the Buchanan estate on Loch Lomond, Scotland, built 1852-1854 in the Gothic Revival style
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Innerkip – Tavistock and Innerkip Book – 132 Coleman Street – Gothic – built 1888 – 2 story stone building, steel roof
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kemptville Book – Toledo – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, painted corner quoins and voussoirs
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingsville – 90 Main Street East – The Jacob Wigle/William Mortan Webb House built 1886 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window, decorative brickwork including sawtooth designs, hood molds over the windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 5775 Peer Street – John Misener Jr. was born in 1829. He was 26 when he purchased the land on Peer Street from his father. His father, Captain John Misener owned and operated a wagon-making business on the corner of Main Street and Peer Street. John Misener Jr. assumed the wagon-making business after his father’s death in 1855. The house, c. 1855, is in the Ontario Gothic style with a central gable in the roof. The gable window design with a pediment is an adaptation of Italianate form. The field stone wall of the verandah was a later addition. The upper portion of the verandah features elaborate woodwork with turned posts.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 429 Ella Street – Lancey Hall built by Henry Warren Lancey – c. 1876 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim and finials on gables, iron cresting above bay window and enclosed front porch
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Hope Book 2 – 115 Dorset Street West – Thomas Clarke House (The Cone) – c. 1858 – The one and a half story grey board and batten house incorporates some elements of the Gothic Revival style. It has steeply pitched gables, the appearance of irregularity because of complex roof patterns, pointed arched openings such as the Gothic window above the doorway, and decorative details including the quatrefoil window tracery in this same window, the barge boards in the gable peaks and the finial. A notable feature of the exterior is, the board and batten, was preferred by Downing for he believed that it was more economical than clapboard, and because it was a bolder method of construction, it better expressed the picturesque beauty essentially belonging to wooden houses. The main facade has three pairs of four over four double-hung sashes, a bay projection containing three casement windows, and five six over six double-hung sashes. The central double doors each have twelve windowpanes.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Rockwood – 130 Guelph Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables, corner quoins, arched voussoirs, two-story tower-like bay
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 1 – 316 Christina Street North – Mackenzie House – 1856 – Gothic Revival – 2-story brick, high-peaked gable roof, elaborately decorated gable with barge board, finial and two pendants
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Smiths Falls – 84 Lombard Street – Gothic – finials and trim on gables, corner quoins, voussoirs with keystones, second floor balcony; bay window with cornice brackets; turned spindle roof supports for veranda
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. George Book 1 – 19 Beverly Street East – Gothic – paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Jacobs – 7 Cedar Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 2 – 144 Queen Street West – built in 1865 for James McKay, one of St. Marys first inhabitants – the portico was added in the 1880s; Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gable with finial; transom and sidelights around door
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Thomas – 13 Wellington Street – built in 1881 – Gothic Revival – ornate verge board on dormer and extending wing, roof is surfaced in patterned slate, iron cresting above bay window and above porch, elaborate stone eyebrows surmount the paired windows on the second floor
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Strathroy – 145 Front Street – Gothic – corner quoins, shutters
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Stratford – 122 Mornington Street – Gothic Revival triple-gabled home, verge board trim on gables, finials, corner quoins; front door has bracketed transom and sidelight windows
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – 140 Bidwell Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Thunder Bay – Fort William Book 1 – 808 Ridgeway Street – St. Paul’s Anglican Church – A.D. 1907 Built in the English Gothic style. Cut stone hooded moldings are found over the main entrance with lancet windows on either side. The two asymmetrical towers, a common feature of Gothic style churches, are topped with a crenellated roof line, giving the church a medieval-like appearance. The tallest tower has lancet winds, a rose window and a clock.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln – Beamsville – 5053 King Street – Beam Barnes House c. 1855 – The property was originally granted by the Crown to Samuel Corwin in 1803. His wife was Anna Beam, daughter of Loyalist pioneer Jacob Beam. Her brother, Jacob Beam Jr. built the house between 1852 and 1855. The frame house is an early version of the Gothic Revival style. Notable features are steeply pitched gable roofs with carved finials and cut out quatrefoils worked into the barge board on both the front facade and east wing. The veranda has simple square posts, and the front door has a paned transom and sidelights. The tops of the slender but widely framed windows are surrounded with shaped lintels and decorative keystones.
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Uxbridge Book 1 – 169 Brock Street West – Jones House – Town Constable – c. 1876 – Gothic Revival with verge board trim and finial on gable
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 292 Dundas Street – Maple Lawn House 1860 – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on triple gables
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterloo Book 1 – 36 Young Street West – a former farmhouse on 300 acres built in 1849 – 1½ story Gothic Revival style, gingerbread barge boards and tall finial on the dormer, broken arch of the gable window, tripartite windows of the front facade – the small second front door gave access to the doctor’s office
Gothic Architectural Photos, Ontario
Zorra Township – Embro – 109 Huron Street – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window