August, 2017:

Listowel, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Listowel, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Listowel is located in the municipality of North Perth, northwest of Kitchener/Waterloo, and west of Elmira on Highway 86.

Settler John Binning arrived in 1857 and was the first to create a permanent residence in the area. The community was originally named Mapleton, but the name was changed when a post office was established. The new name was chosen by a government official and refers to Listowel, Ireland (a market town in County Kerry situated on the River Feale, twenty-eight kilometers, or seventeen miles, from the county town, Tralee.) The majority of early settlers were of Protestant Irish origin.

In 1871 the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway extended its line to Listowel. It was joined in 1873 by a second railway, the Stratford and Huron Railway, and Listowel became an important shipping point. The population doubled when industries, including a woolen mill, a sawmill, a planing mill and a tannery, were established. In 1891 the Morris, Field, Rogers Company Ltd began to manufacture Morris pianos in Listowel.

In 1907, hydroelectric and telephone services came to the town with the Princess cinema. During World War II the theater was renamed the Capitol and remains Canada’s oldest operating cinema.

The Campbell Soup Company was a major local employer for 48 years, operating a frozen, food service and specialty food plant in Listowel.  The factory closed in April 2008. The surrounding area is mostly agricultural land located on the Perth Plain, dominated by the beef and pork industries.

Architectural Photos, Listowel, Ontario

215 Binning Street West – two-storey, white brick, tower, dormer – originally this was a full three storeys high with a Mansard roof; a fire in 1922 damaged the upper level and a new roof was added in the Queen Anne style; spindle railing around circular balcony, Doric pillars, pediment

Architectural Photos, Listowel, Ontario

415 Inkerman Street West – built in two distinct styles – the larger east half is Italianate with paired cornice brackets, iron cresting above porch and above bay window, decorative gable; the smaller west half is rural Ontario design with a verandah

Architectural Photos, Listowel, Ontario

370 Inkerman Street West – triple gable Gothic Revival

Architectural Photos, Listowel, Ontario

469 Main Street West – Second Empire style, Mansard roof, dormers with window hoods, built of Wallace brick – was once on edge of town and operated as the Last Chance Hotel – last chance for a drink before leaving town

Architectural Photos, Listowel, Ontario

507 Main Street West – Queen Anne style with plenty of windows, chimneys and gables

Architectural Photos, Listowel, Ontario

555 Main Street West – Italianate with four-storey tower, belvedere on roof – site of Listowel’s first settler John Binning’s log cabin; the present house is one of the oldest in town, built in 1860, tower and front half added in 1870

Wellesley, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Wellesley, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

The Township of Wellesley is the rural, north-western township of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. The township comprises the communities of Bamberg, Crosshill, Hawkesville, Heidelberg, Kingwood, Knight’s Corners, Linwood, Macton, St. Clements, Wallenstein and Wellesley.

The country scenery and rolling hills, along with its small town feel, have transformed the township into a commuter town with the population travelling into the nearby cities of Kitchener and Waterloo for work.

Wellesley Township was surveyed in 1842, but settlers were in this area long before.  The town of Wellesley’s original name was Schmidtsville, derived from its founding settler, John Schmidt.  In 1851, the town was renamed Wellesley after Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley, the eldest brother of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. The community quickly grew to be the largest economic centre in rural Waterloo Region with a wood mill, feed mill, grain mill (which still stands after being constructed in 1856), leather tanner, cheese factory, restaurants and housing, and many other businesses that also brought much trade to the town from the nearby farms and farming villages.

When the Waterloo County boundaries were established in 1852 they included the townships of Waterloo, Wellesley, Wilmot, Woolwich, and North Dumfries.

The first library in Wellesley Village was incorporated in 1900. The current branch is located in the former S.S. No. 16 Wellesley Township public school building. The school closed its doors in 1967.

Architectural Photos, Wellesley, Ontario

1115 Queen’s Bush Road – Italianate style, hipped roof, dormer

Architectural Photos, Wellesley, Ontario

1110 Queen’s Bush Road – Queen Anne style

Architectural Photos, Wellesley, Ontario

1155 Queen’s Bush Road – Queen Anne style

Architectural Photos, Wellesley, Ontario

1189 Queen’s Bush Road – cobblestone architecture, cornice return on end gable

Architectural Photos, Wellesley, Ontario

1193 Queen’s Bush Road – Nith River Chop House – Second Empire style – mansard roof with dormers

Architectural Photos, Wellesley, Ontario

Nafziger Road – Edwardian – wraparound verandahs on both storeys, Palladian window, fretwork

Linwood and Erbsville, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Linwood and Erbsville, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

The Township of Wellesley is the rural, north-western township of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. The township comprises the communities of Bamberg, Crosshill, Hawkesville, Heidelberg, Kingwood, Knight’s Corners, Linwood, Macton, St. Clements, Wallenstein and Wellesley.

The country scenery and rolling hills, along with its small town feel, have transformed the township into a commuter town with the population traveling into the nearby cities of Kitchener and Waterloo for work.

Wellesley Township was surveyed in 1842, but settlers were in this area long before. The town of Wellesley’s original name was Schmidtsville, derived from its founding settler, John Schmidt.  In 1851, the town was renamed Wellesley after Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley, the eldest brother of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. The community quickly grew to be the largest economic center in rural Waterloo Region with a wood mill, feed mill, grain mill (which still stands after being constructed in 1856), leather tanner, cheese factory, restaurants and housing, and many other businesses that also brought much trade to the town from the nearby farms and farming villages.

When the Waterloo County boundaries were established in 1852 they included the townships of Waterloo, Wellesley, Wilmot, Woolwich, and North Dumfries.

The first library in Wellesley Village was incorporated in 1900. The current branch is located in the former S.S. No. 16 Wellesley Township public school building. The school closed its doors in 1967.

Macton is on the northern boundary line of Wellesley Township, three miles northeast of Linwood, twenty miles northwest of Berlin, three miles east of Wallenstein. Macton was settled later than St. Clements, mostly by Irish people.

Erbsville is located about five miles west of Kitchener.

Architectural Photos, Linwood, Ontario

Ament Line, Linwood – Edwardian, fretwork

Architectural Photos, Linwood, Ontario

5186 Ament Line, Linwood, Ontario – Italianate, with two-and-a-half storey tower-like structure, arched window voussoirs, dentil molding

Architectural Photos, Linwood, Ontario

5297 Ament Line – Gothic Revival, unique shape, cornice return on end gable

Architectural Photos, Linwood, Ontario

5235 Ament Line, Linwood, Ontario – Italianate – cornice brackets, balcony on second floor

Architecural Photos, Linwood, Ontario

3744 Manser Road, Linwood, Ontario – Gothic Revival

Archtiectural Photos, Erbsville, Ontario

Queen Anne style, verge board trim on gables – Erbsville

St. Jacobs and area, Ontario – My Top 7 Picks

St. Jacobs and area, Ontario – My Top 7 Picks

St. Jacobs is located in southwest Ontario just north of Waterloo. It is a popular location for tourism due to its Mennonite heritage and retail focus. The Conestogo River, which powered the village’s original gristmill, runs through the village.

St. Jacobs was settled in 1819 and was first known as “Jakobstettel” which means “Jacob’s Village” or “James’s Village”. The St. was added to the name simply to make it sound more pleasing and the pluralization was in honor of the combined efforts of Jacob C. Snider and his son, Jacob C. Snider, Jr., founders of the village.

St. Jacobs’ developed as a thriving business community throughout the 1800s with such businesses as a felt factory, tannery, glue factory, flour mill, saw mill, and furniture factory. The village served the needs of surrounding pioneer farm settlements. Situated on Arthur Road, St. Jacobs boasted four hotels by 1852. One of these – Benjamin’s Restaurant and Inn – is still operating today.

St. Jacobs features dozens of artisans in historic buildings, such as the Country Mill, Village Silos, Mill Shed, and the Old Factory. Visitors may watch artisans make pottery, quilts, designer clothes, jewelry, glass vases, woven wall hangings, Tiffany lamps, stained glass doors, miniature doll houses, and more. There are also two blacksmith shops to visit. The Visitor Centre is a Mennonite interpretation center providing information and education on the Mennonite people in the community.

St. Clements, Heidelberg, Crosshill and Bamberg are communities in the Township of Wellesley.

Architectural Photos, St. Jacobs, Ontario

7 Cedar Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim

Architectural Photos, St. Jacobs, Ontario

20 Isabella Street – Edwardian, second floor balcony

Architectural Photos, St. Jacobs, Ontario

29 Spring Street – Gothic Revival – corner quoins

Architectural Photos, St. Jacobs, Ontario

29 Albert Street – Queen Anne style

Architectural Photos, St. Clements, Ontario

Lobsinger Line, St. Clements – Italianate, hipped roof, pediment

Architectural Photos, Crosshill, Ontario

Crosshill – Gothic Revival, corner quoins

Architectural Photos, Bamberg, Ontario

Bamberg – Cobblestone house