December, 2018:

Burford, Ontario in Colour Photos Book 2 – My Top 8 Picks

Burford is in the County of Brant and is located eight kilometers west of the City of Brantford along Highway 53, and seventy kilometers east of London.

 In 1793 Lieutenant-Governor Simcoe granted to Abraham Dayton the entire Township of Burford. Dayton was a native of Milford, Connecticut. The township was to become the “new Jerusalem” for a religious sect with which he was affiliated. Dayton broke his ties with the sect and settled just west of the present village of Burford. He was responsible for bringing several families into the township and by the spring of 1797 the new settlement consisted of twenty-one families. Abraham Dayton died March 1, 1797 after a prolonged illness. Abigail Dayton, Abraham’s widow, later married Colonel Joel Stone and moved to Gananoque where she lived until her death in 1843 at the age of 93.The Dayton’s only child, Abiah, was the wife of Benajah Mallory and she and her husband followed her parents into this township. Benajah Mallory became a man of considerable influence and by 1805 was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada representing Norfolk, Oxford, and Middlesex. In June 1812, war was declared against Upper Canada by the United States. During the course of the war, Mallory accepted a commission in the U.S. forces and was considered a traitor back home. Benajah Mallory became outlawed and his land was forfeited to the Crown.

John Yeigh, his wife Mary and their children Jacob, John Junior, Adam,Henry and Eva arrived in Burford from Pennsylvania by covered wagon in June1800. The family cleared land, farmed and established the first pottery in the Burford area. Jacob and Adam distinguished themselves in the War of 1812 and were also active participants in the 1837 Rebellion.

Mount Vernon was originally named Springfield and subsequently Chequered Sheds because the posts were painted in black and white checkerboard fashion to mark several parking spots for rigs at the hotel across from Kenny’s Store. The present name, according to oral history, was given by a railway company in honor of the home of George Washington, the first president of the United States.

Thomas Perrin laid out the village. He established the first store in 1835, built the first sawmill in 1840 and the first gristmill in 1845.

Bishopsgate is located on Highway 53 between Mount Vernon and Burford.

Langford is located on Highway 2/53 east of Fairchild’s Creek about three kilometers east of Cainsville. The village was named for Jacob Lang, an early settler who came from Pennsylvania to this area bout 1807. United Empire Loyalists settled here in the late 1700s. Several streams flowing south gave power to saw and grist mills in the area. A brickyard and a blacksmith shop were established here. The first post office was called Lang’s Ford as all of the travelers had to ford the swampy stream in the hollow just east of Jacob Lang’s farm. Later the name was changed to Langford.

Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
280 Maple Avenue South – built in Neo-Classic style by W. H. Metcalf – hipped roof, cornice brackets, raised corner quoins; Metcalf Family Crest carved in the wall
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
358 Maple Avenue South – Italianate – dichromatic brickwork on corners
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
363 Maple Avenue South – built in the Queen Anne style by George Holt with a wraparound porch with wooden pillars. The upper storey has a bay window with one gable and cornice returns and rounded windows. There is decorative fretting under the eaves.
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
374 Maple Avenue South – cornice brackets, corner quoins
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
114 Fairfield Road – 1891 – Jacob Williams built this house of red brick with a slate roof, beautiful stained glass windows and decorative brickwork over and under the windows. Front and side porches are original.
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
212 Bishopsgate Road – corner quoins, verge board trim on gable, second floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
270 Bishopsgate Road – This Georgian house has elaborate porch arches and gingerbread with intricate fretwork. The windows are six over six panes.
Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario
300 Bishopsgate Road – 1860 – This house has a beautiful field stone façade with extensive use of finely dressed limestone quoins, lintels and window labels.

Burford, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 9 Picks

Burford, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 9 Picks

Burford is in the County of Brant and is located eight kilometers west of the City of Brantford along Highway 53, and seventy kilometers east of London.

In 1793 Lieutenant-Governor Simcoe granted to Abraham Dayton the entire Township of Burford. Dayton was a native of Milford, Connecticut. The township was to become the “new Jerusalem” for a religious sect with which he was affiliated. Dayton broke his ties with the sect and settled just west of the present village of Burford. He was responsible for bringing several families into the township and by the spring of 1797 the new settlement consisted of twenty-one families. Abraham Dayton died March 1, 1797 after a prolonged illness. Abigail Dayton, Abraham’s widow, later married Colonel Joel Stone and moved to Gananoque where she lived until her death in 1843 at the age of 93. The Dayton’s only child, Abiah, was the wife of Benajah Mallory and she and her husband followed her parents into this township. Benajah Mallory became a man of considerable influence and by 1805 was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada representing Norfolk, Oxford, and Middlesex. In June 1812, war was declared against Upper Canada by the United States. During the course of the war, Mallory accepted a commission in the U.S. forces and was considered a traitor back home. Benajah Mallory became outlawed and his land was forfeited to the Crown.

John Yeigh, his wife Mary and their children Jacob, John Junior, Adam, Henry and Eva arrived in Burford from Pennsylvania by covered wagon in June 1800. The family cleared land, farmed and established the first pottery in the Burford area. Jacob and Adam distinguished themselves in the War of 1812 and were also active participants in the 1837 Rebellion.

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

306 Highway 53 – Farrington House – 1883 – built by James Farrington – Italianate style with buff brick, decorative red string course and arches over the Roman style windows. The original front and side porches have gingerbread trim. James Farrington traveled to California during the gold rush as was involved in many successful business enterprises including ranching, gold and silver mining and high plains freighting

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

378 West Quarter Townline Road – Heritage Property – This house has Roman influenced windows with alternating brick to simulate quoining and geometric shapes such as diamonds in the apex of the gable ends. It has three gable ends and both a front and side porch.

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

110 King Street – Dr. Hervey Ross House – 1851 – It is usually called “The Miller House” and is a rare example of a Regency winged temple building. It is called a “winged plan” because it has a one and a half storey central body with flanking one-storey wings. Decorative features are fancy verge board along the front gable and French casement style windows.

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

126 King Street – Post Office – A.D. 1914 – Two-storey smooth red brick structure has ashlar stone lintels and string courses at the window liens. It is sometimes called Edwardian in style because it was built during the reign of King Edward VII. The clock tower is a landmark for the business district.

Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario

150 King Street – Armoury – 1906 – The central tower has a Roman arched window and Gothic detail as well as battlementing. The double front doors have a stained glass transom. It was used by the 1st Cavalry 2nd 10th Brant Dragoons for training and recreation. It served as a hospital during the flu epidemic of 1918 and a temporary high school in 1921. During the War of 1812, Burford became an important post, being located between Ancaster and Detroit. The military parade ground was located on this property and occupied most of what is now the residential block between William and Jarvis Streets.

Architectural Photos, Burford, Ontario

155 King Street – Heritage Property – c. 1835 – Sprowl House – Doric columns support a sleeper veranda used on hot summer nights. The six over six windows are original. This is the former home of A.D. Muir who was active in the militia and joined the Burford Troop of Cavalry in 1881. In 1813, following the defeat of the Canadians at the battle of Moraviantown (west of London), General Proctor persuaded a group of nearly 3000 native warriors and their families to retreat with him to a powerful for, which he claimed to be at Burford. Some of this group encamped her (across from the military parade grounds) while the rest of the group was located west of the village by the creek.

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

158 King Street – dormers, iron cresting around second floor balcony

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

159 King Street – 1888 – Gothic, iron cresting around second floor balcony, cornice brackets, stenciling and decorative veranda pillars, bay window on end of house

Architecural Photos, Burford, Ontario

55 Maple Avenue North – Stuart House – 1886 – was built by Elijah Stuart in the Georgian Symmetry style with Italianate features, segmental arched windows, double brackets under the eaves and quoining on the corners. The double-hung front door has a fanlight and the second floor door has a keystone arch linking the same color detail line across the front of the house.

St. George, Ontario – Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

St. George, Ontario – Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

The County of Brant is located at the mid-point of the Grand River as it flows south from Luther Marsh to Lake Erie.

In 1852 the City of Brantford, the Village of Paris, and the Townships of Brantford, Oakland, Onondaga, South Dumfries, and Burford became Brant County.

Two hundred years ago, Obed Wilson ventured forth seeking an area in Upper Canada in which to settle. He discovered a place with fertile land, sparkling water and natural beauty which enticed him to stay and build a log cabin. Eventually the vision grew into the Village of St. George.

St. George, located to the north of the City of Brantford, is in the Township of South Dumfries. It was founded in 1814. John and Peter Bauslaugh were early settlers in St. George, and the early name of the village was “Bauslaugh Mills” in honor of John Bauslaugh who owned a sawmill near Highway 99. Main Street began to develop in the 1820s when Henry Moe began selling fish and dry goods from the first log building. By 1832, the village had three churches and several businesses. Today Main Street continues to thrive with many of the original buildings from the 1800s attracting people to the antique shops, cafes and restaurants.

The community around Bethel Road with Rest Acres Road to the east and Bishopsgate Road to the west was settled in the 1830s. The major industry in this area was farming. Some of its first settlers were the Gurneys, McAllisters (wagon maker), Aulsebrooks, Lovetts and Major Arnold Burrowes whose 1,000 acre estate was known as Strathmore. On his estate Major Burrowes constructed a mill dam, stock pens, hop mill, a distillery, a grist mill and a plaster mill.

The Township of Oakland includes the towns of Scotland and Oakland. It has a rich history.

Scotland is located on the Burford/Oakland township line. The village was surveyed and laid out by Eliakim Malcolm. The first hotel opened in 1830, the first story in 1837 and the first post office in 1855. Malcolm’s Creek had enough waterpower to sustain several industries such as a woolen mill, gristmill, tannery and foundry. Other early industries were a cooperage, a wagon and carriage works, carriage and buggy works and a starch factory. Two doctors and a lawyer practiced in Scotland in the mid-1800s.

The Village of Oakland is located three kilometers east of Scotland on the Oakland Road. Oakland was named for a ridge of oak trees that ran through it. In 1850, the first municipal office was at the Oakland Post Office. A town hall was built in 1854 and Council met there until the early 1900s. Oakland had a grist mill in 1806, saw mill in 1807, a cheese factory, cider mill, three general stores, a shoemaker, harness maker, and a hotel.

Oakland is the site of the Battle of Malcolm Mills which was the last land battle of the War of 1812 on Canadian soil against an official foreign power. The battle took place at the stream that runs through Lion’s Park. In October 1814, an invading American force of about seven hundred men under Brigadier-General Duncan McArthur advanced rapidly up the Thames Valley. He intended to devastate the Grand River settlements and the region around the head of Lake Ontario, which supplied British forces on the Niagara Frontier. McArthur reached the Grand, and after an unsuccessful attempt to force a crossing, attacked a body of about one hundred and fifty militia at Malcom’s Mills (Oakland) on November 6th. Canadian forces put up a spirited resistance but were overwhelmed.

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

356 St. George Road – hipped roof with dormers

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

125 McLean School Road – Italianate, cornice brackets, two-storey bay window, corner quoins

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

86 McLean School Road – Smith I. Wait House – circa 1875 – High Victorian and Italianate – three layers of brick for the main part of the house and a two-feet thick stone foundation – cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

380 Branchton Road – Mayhill Villa/Lewis C. Cope Residence – circa 1867 – Italianate – half-round windows, two sets of original compound chimneys, hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins; etched stained glass in the fanlight and sidelights provide an attractive entry

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

Glen Morris Road East – cut stone railway bridge constructed in 1854 by the Great Western Railway Company over Glen Morris Road East to link Harrisburg with Galt. It is a beautiful example of masonry work with its double arches with keystones which allow both the road and stream to pass under it.

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

254 Glen Morris Road East – Italianate – two-storey frontispiece, verge board trim and finial on gable, cornice brackets, corner quoins, dentil molding, fanlight

Architectural Photos Ontario

359 Regional Road 35 (Blue Lake Road) – circa 1830 – Neo-Gothic style farmhouse – Adelaide Hoodless was born here in St. George, the youngest of twelve children. Her father died a few months after her birth. Her mother, Jane Hamilton Hunter, was left to manage the farm and a large household. Perhaps the hard work and isolation of her youth inspired Adelaide to take up the cause of domestic reform years later. After her schooling in a one-room schoolhouse, she stayed with her sister Lizzie while attending ‘Ladies College’ in Brantford, Ontario. While there, she met John Hoodless who was also the close friend of her sister Lizzie’s future husband, Seth Charlton. John Hoodless was the only surviving son of a successful Hamilton furniture manufacturer (Joseph Hoodless). Adelaide married John Hoodless and moved to Hamilton. Adelaide and John had four children: Edna, Muriel, Bernard and John Harold.

Architectural Photos, Bethel Road, Ontario

Bethel Road – Gothic – verge board trim on gable

Architectural Photos, Bethel Road, Ontario

Bethel Road – multi-colored stone

Architectural Photos, St. George, Ontario

308 Robinson Road – Apps Mill – 1846 – The Apps family operated it as a flour mill using Whiteman Creek for power until 1959 when hurricane Hazel flooded the entire bottom floor. It has horizontal wood siding and six over six windows.

Architectural Photos, Oakland, Ontario

154 Oakland Road – Oakland United Church – (Methodist Church – 1886) – Gothic Revival, lancet windows, dichromatic brickwork, buttresses

Architectural Photos, Oakland, Ontario

129 Oakland Road, Oakland – Built by Mordecai Westbrook, a member of one of the original families of Oakland. Georgian style with original double hung six over six windows and shutters. The walls are triple-bricked with bricks said to have been made on site. The widow’s walk and rear stone coach house are both original.

Architectural Photos, Oakland, Ontario

Oakland Road, Oakland, Ontario

Architectural Photos, Scotland, Ontario

Oakland Road, Scotland – dichromatic brickwork

Architectural Photos, Scotland, Ontario

27 Talbot Street – 1890 – is an early Queen Anne style featuring a wraparound veranda with elaborate scroll work, spool work and patterned brick work with a string course at the frieze. Rusticated brick is used to ornament the principal window drip mold. Cornice return around the dormer bulls-eye window.