June, 2019:

Cayuga and York, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Cayuga and York, Ontario

Early patterns of settlement in Haldimand County are still visible in the landscape and architecture, spanning from the pre-Contact era to the proclamation of the Haldimand Land Grant for the Six Nations and the subsequent migration of Loyalist settlers – Americans, largely of German descent and Mennonite tradition. Throughout the 1800s, immigration from the British Isles contributed significantly to the area’s development, as did the small but industrious Black community of the late nineteenth century – many descended from ex-slaves of the American South. Since the post-war years of the twentieth century, a significant stream of immigration from the Netherlands has also added to our ever-expanding mosaic of cultural identity, as have the age-old traditions of our Indigenous neighbors – the Six Nations and New Credit communities.

Following the American Revolution, Sir Frederick Haldimand, Governor-in-Chief of Canada, granted in 1784 to the Six Nations of the Iroquois a tract of land extending for six miles on both sides of the Grand River from its source to Lake Erie. This grant was made in recognition of their services as allies of the British Crown during the war, and to recompense them for the loss of their former lands in northern New York State. In later years, large areas of this tract, including portions of the present counties of Haldimand, Brant, Waterloo and Wellington, were sold to white settlers.

By 1853, Cayuga had lumber yards, a foundry, and a glass factory.

At its height, York had twenty businesses that included mills, inns, shoemakers, general stores, blacksmiths, and a lumber yard. It had a two-room school house and two churches.

Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
1 Cayuga Street North – Greek Revival – pediment above Doric pillars, keystones, quoins
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
12 Cayuga Street North – Post Office
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
31 Cayuga Street taken from Mohawk Street – Edwardian with bay windows, turret in wing
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
55 Munsee Street – Jailer’s Residence – 1877 – Italianate style, low hipped roof, overhanging eaves with brackets, a bullseye window
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
Munsee Street – Italianate, paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
41 Echo Street – Italianate, dormer in attic
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
40 Ottawa Street – hipped roof, bay window
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
26 Tuscarora Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets, two-story bay windows
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
5 Mohawk Street – The Duff House – replica of a 17th century New England Garrison style house – steep pitched cedar-shake A-roof, second story overhang, double casement wooden windows
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
17 Winnett Street – gable roof, balanced facade, side sun room with balcony above
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
4104 Highway 3 – Campbell-Pine House – c. 1895 – limestone farmhouse with hipped roof, two-story veranda; a large portion of Donald Campbell’s 1847 stone cottage is incorporated into the walls of the house. Donald Campbell was one of the earliest settlers of North Cayuga Township; he operated a steam sawmill on the premises.
Architectural Photos, Cayuga, Ontario
243 Haldimand Highway 54 – Ruthven Estate, the main house and wing, c. 1845, was designed by the master building/architect John Latshaw. Ruthven Park is a 1,500-acre country estate. The house is in the Greek Revival style with a broad staircase leading to a front landing with classical columns. The south wing was added c. 1860, the south-east wing c. 1880, and the east wing c. 1884. It was the former home of five generations of the Thompson family from the 1840s to 1990s. David Thompson came to the area and started a saw mill in 1834, and added a grist mill in 1836. David was instrumental in the laying out of the former 1200-acre town of Indiana. He eventually owned two sawmills, as well as a gristmill, carding mill, cooperage, and several stores. Overall, Indiana supported over thirty industries and was the largest industrial town in Haldimand County in the mid-nineteenth century.
Architectural Photos, York, Ontario
39 Front Street South, York – The Enniskillen Lodge, formerly the Barber Hotel, was built in 1862 for Mr. Daniel Barber, a prominent local hotelier. Large Georgian style windows, doors, and brick detailing are spaced and designed symmetrically. It has a projected cornice with dentils, Regency four-panel door with sidelights and rectangular transom, hood molds over windows, horizontal banding, and corner quoins.
Architectural Photos, York, Ontario
2389 Haldimand Road 9 – Italianate – cornice brackets, corner quoins, two-story bay windows

Fisherville, Nanticoke, Selkirk, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Fisherville, Nanticoke, Selkirk, Ontario

Haldimand County is a municipality on the Niagara Peninsula in Southern Ontario, on the north shore of Lake Erie, and on the Grand River. Haldimand was first created as a county in 1800, from a portion of Norfolk. It was named after the governor of the Province of Quebec Sir Frederick Haldimand. From 1974 to 2000, Haldimand County and Norfolk County were merged to form the Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk.

The population centers in Haldimand are Caledonia, Dunnville, Hagersville, Jarvis and Cayuga. Most of Haldimand is agricultural land, although some heavy industry, including the Nanticoke Generating Station, is located here. Some of the smaller communities within the municipality are Byng, Canborough, Canfield, Cheapside, Fisherville, Kohler, Lowbanks, Nanticoke, Rainham Centre, Selkirk, South Cayuga, Sweets Corners, and York.

The first white inhabitants of Rainham were Jacob Hoover with his sons Abraham, David, Benjamin and Daniel who came from Pennsylvania in 1791, traveling in wagons in which they carried all their moveable possessions.

They purchased about 2,500 acres of land from the government. The Hoovers were Mennonites of Swiss descent. The Hoovers were a thrifty and industrious family and soon had large clearings. They became wealthy as they were the first settlers who had any surplus produce to sell to others who came a few years later.

Manufactured items were very expensive so the settlers made as many items as they could. Many of them made their own harness of basswood bark boiled in lye which was a fair substitute for leather.

The township covers about 25,000 acres with stiff clay soil that is very productive and well cultivated. Fisherville and Rainham Centre are the only villages wholly in the township. Fisherville is the center of the German settlement and has a population of about one hundred and fifty people.

Nanticoke is located on the western border of Haldimand County. Nanticoke is located directly across Lake Erie from the United States city of Erie, Pennsylvania. Unlike the majority of Haldimand or Norfolk County, Nanticoke is a highly industrialized community. This community is southeast of Simcoe in neighboring Norfolk County and south of Brantford. Nanticoke’s residential area is bordered on the west by the Nanticoke Industrial Park, home to the U.S. Steel Canada Lake Erie Works and a number of smaller businesses.

The Esso Refinery Nanticoke is on the northeast, and the Nanticoke Generating Station is on the southeast. Nanticoke used to be a bustling farming and fishing community inhabited since the late eighteenth century. Nanticoke adapted to the Industrial Revolution and became a desired spot for heavy industry.

In 1974, Nanticoke was incorporated as a city within the Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk through the amalgamation of the towns of Port Dover and Waterford, the village of Jarvis, and parts of the townships of Rainham, Townsend, Walpole and Woodhouse. In 2001, the town and all other municipalities within the region were dissolved and the region was divided into two single tier municipalities with city-status but called counties. What was the city of Nanticoke is now split between Haldimand County and Norfolk County. Wind Turbines were installed in November 2013.

Cheapside is located in the Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk and is part of the City of Nanticoke. I n 1854 David Silverthom settled here and opened the first store. He was bought out in 1860 by William Pugsley who called the place Cheap Corner. When the post office opened around 1865 the postal department proposed the present name which was accepted by residents.

Lake Erie shoreline, quiet roads and countryside make Selkirk a haven for travelers. Selkirk is located forty-five kilometers southwest of Hamilton and a short drive from Dunnville, Cayuga, Port Dover and Simcoe. Selkirk is the oldest village in Walpole Township. Settled by the Hoover family around 1800, the village was the site of a mill and an important center for the local farming community. When the post office opened in 1831 the village was called Walpole. In 1855, the village was renamed Selkirk, in honor of Thomas Douglas, Lord Selkirk, who once owned land in the area.

Architectural Photos, Fisherville, Ontario
Ye Olde Fisherville Restaurant
Architectural Photos, Fisherville, Ontario
#4 – second floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Fisherville, Ontario
#9, Fisherville – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Fisherville, Ontario
#19, Fisherville – larger dormer, wraparound veranda
Architectural Photos, Fisherville, Ontario
#12 – Fisherville, Ontario
Architectural Photos, Fisherville, Ontario
#5 Fisherville, Ontario
601 Haldimand Road 12, Fisherville
601 Haldimand Road 12, Fisherville – The Charles Reicheld House crafted by traditional German carpenter Valentine Hartwick in 1886 – farmhouse with cornice brackets, dichromatic brickwork, hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Selkirk, Ontario
95 Concession 4, Fisherville – The Hoover log house built in 1793 on the Lake Erie shore south of Selkirk for Daniel Hoover, son of Jacob Hoover from Pennsylvania. In 1997, the fire damaged remnants were brought by Mr. Bill Fletcher, reassembled and relocated on his farm.
Architectural Photos, Rainham Centre, Ontario
255 Kohler Road, Rainham Centre – former school
Architectural Photos, Nanticoke, Ontario
Nanticoke – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables
Architectural Photos, Nanticoke, Ontario
Rainham Road – Methodist Church – 1874
Architectural Photos, Cheapside, Ontario
Wilson MacDonald Memorial School Museum, Cheapside – The original square framed school was opened on land owned by James Buckley and was replaced by this red brick one in 1872. It closed in 1965 and reopened in 1967 as a museum and memorial to Wilson MacDonald, a former student and renowned poet.
Architectural Photos, Selkirk, Ontario
S.S. No. 3 Union School, Selkirk – 1918 – the school closed in 1949. It reopened in 1967 as a library and Selkirk Centennial Community Centre.
Architectural Photos, Selkirk, Ontario
27 Erie Street South, Selkirk – James Cooper built this house in 1870. In 1878 he sold it to George Hoover. The frame house has irregular massing and is in the Second Empire style. It has an over-sized horseshoe dormer with barge board and finial, elaborate window molds with pediments. The three-story tower has four dormers in the mansard roof. The Fess family purchased it in 1947.
Architectural Photos, Selkirk, Ontario
15 Erie Street North, Selkirk – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, quoins, banding
Architectural Photos, Selkirk, Ontario
15 Erie Street North, Selkirk – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, quoins, banding