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Norwich, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Norwich, Ontario in Colour Photos

In 1799, the Township of Norwich was laid out by surveyor William Hambly into lines and concessions and 200-acre lots.

In 1809, Peter Lossing, a member of the Society of Friends from Dutchess County New York, visited Norwich Township. In June 1910, with his brother-in-law Peter de Long, purchased 15,000 acres of land in this area. That fall Lossing brought his family to Upper Canada. The de Long family and nine others soon joined them. By 1820 an additional group of about fifty had settled here. These resourceful pioneers founded one of the most successful Quaker communities in Upper Canada.

The township was divided into North and South Norwich Townships in 1855.

In 1975, Oxford County underwent countywide municipal restructuring. The Village of Norwich and the Townships of East Oxford, North Norwich and South Norwich were amalgamated to create the Township of Norwich.

Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
Stover Street – Italianate, hipped roof, two-story bay window, balcony above enclosed front entrance, corner quoins
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
70 Stover Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim on gables, bay window
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
55 Stover Street – wraparound veranda, paired cornice brackets, decorative cornice, bay windows
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
8 Main Street East – designated – Moore, Chambers House – Gothic, verge board trim on gables, crenelated brick arched veranda with voussoirs and keystones, bay window on side, transom above door
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
16 Main Street East – Gothic – bay window
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
18 Main Street East – Italianate, paired cornice brackets, decorative cornice, corner quoins, pediment with decorated tympanum above Doric pillars, sidelights and transom surround door, bay window on front and side
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
25 Main Street East – Trillium Christian Retirement Home – two-story semi-circular veranda, bay windows, iron cresting, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
69 Main Street West – Italianate, dormer, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, pediment
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
78 Main Street West – Norwich United Church Manse – two-story white-brick manse was constructed in 1875 – a blocky, Italianate residence with symmetry of paired cornice brackets and twin round-headed windows and doors of second-story
Architectural Photos, Norwich, Ontario
90 Main Street West – Gothic

Otterville and Burgessville, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 10 Picks

Otterville and Burgessville

The Township of Norwich is located in Oxford County in southwestern Ontario. Pioneering families emigrated from Norwich in upper New York State in the early 19th century. Oxford County Road 59 is the major north–south highway through much of the township, including the community of Norwich proper. The local economy is largely agricultural, based on corn, soybean, and wheat production with dairy farming in the north part of the township and tobacco, vegetable, and ginseng farming to the south. Slowly, ginseng and traditional cash crops are replacing the former cash crop – tobacco, as demand shrinks.

In 1799, the Township of Norwich was laid out by surveyor William Hambly into lines and concessions and 200-acre lots. The township was divided into North and South Norwich Townships in 1855.

In 1975, Oxford County underwent countywide municipal restructuring. The Village of Norwich and the Townships of East Oxford, North Norwich and South Norwich were amalgamated to create the Township of Norwich.

Norwich includes the communities of Beaconsfield, Bond’s Corners, Brown’s Corners, Burgessville, Cornell, Creditville, Curries, Eastwood, Hawtrey, Hink’s Corners, Holbrook, Milldale, Muir, Newark, New Durham, Norwich, Oriel, Otterville, Oxford Centre, Rock’s Mills, Rosanna, Springford, Summerville, Blows, and Vandecar.

Otterville is a village in Norwich Township in Oxford County. It is located on the Otter Creek. Otterville was settled in 1807. Encouraged by local Quakers, free blacks and escaped slaves fled persecution in the United States and found homes in the Otterville area beginning in 1829. Otterville African Methodist Episcopal Church and Cemetery served the local black community until the late 1880s.

Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 233 Main Street West – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roof, Romanesque-style window voussoirs
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – Main Street West – stained glass transoms
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 216 Main Street – dormers, sidelight
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 244 Main Street East – dormer in attic, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, dichromatic voussoirs
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 249 Main Street East – Gothic – verge board trim on gables
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 6 Dover Street
Architectural Photos, Otterville, Ontario
Otterville – 225422 Main Street West – Oddy House – constructed in 1861 – Also called Woodlawn Place which is associated with Thomas Wright, a local, prominent inventor who designed and lived in the building in the mid-nineteenth century. Wright was influenced by Dr. Orson Fowler, whose 1853 book, “The Octagonal House –A Home For All”, encouraged the practicality of octagonal dwellings. Fowler argues that these homes were easier to heat and made greater use of the sun’s rays. It is a fine example of the Regency Cottage style of architecture although its octagonal shape makes it unusual. The building is of plank construction with board and batten siding. The overall plan consists of a 45-foot octagon with a 20 foot by 20-foot wing that is situated to form a trapezoidal umbrage at the side of the house. Typical of the Regency style, Woodlawn Place features a wide roof overhang and deep fascia boards. The front door is flanked with sidelights and Doric pilasters, complimented by a simulated entablature above.
Architectural Photos, Burgessville, Ontario
Burgessville – Church Street – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Burgessville, Ontario
Burgessville – Church Street – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Burgessville, Ontario
20 Church Street – 2½-story tower-like bay, fretwork

Southwest Oxford and Norwich Townships, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Southwest Oxford and Norwich Townships, Ontario

South-West Oxford is a township in Ontario in Oxford County. A predominantly rural municipality, South-West Oxford was formed in 1975 through the amalgamation of Dereham and West Oxford townships and the village of Beachville.

South-West Oxford extends north to south from the middle of Oxford County along the Thames River/Highway 401/Woodstock-Ingersoll east-west corridor to the southern boundary of the county along the Delhi-Tillsonburg-Aylmer/Ontario Highway 3 east-west corridor. The northern boundary follows the course of the Thames River except where carveouts have extended the boundaries of Ingersoll and Woodstock into former township lands.

In its wilderness state, the former Dereham township had thousands of acres of swamp and marsh land which limited its use for agriculture. Several large drainage projects brought great improvement and remain as essential parts of the township’s farmland infrastructure. The township topography still has several large forested areas which are remnants of the original swamps on which drainage system runoff is concentrated.

At its north end, the township is underlain with an unusually pure limestone deposit centered between Ingersoll and Beachville that extends north-west through most of Zorra and south-east into Norwich. Open-pit mining of the limestone and kiln-firing to produce lime has been underway along the Thames River since pioneer days, and since the 1950s heavy industrial operations have led to nearly three thousand acres being licensed for extraction from pits more than 100 feet deep. The size of the limestone deposits is sufficient to support these operations for another century or more.

South-West Oxford includes lands in the former West Oxford township which were the earliest to be settled in Oxford County and also lands in the former Dereham township which were the last in the county to be settled. The greatest cause for slow growth in Dereham was the provincial government’s decision in 1799 to auction off all the wilderness land in the township in large blocks, which thereby fell into the hands of speculators who held the land dormant for decades.

The township of South-West Oxford comprises a number of villages and hamlets, including the following communities such as *Beachville, Brownsville, Brownsville Station, Centreville, Culloden, Delmer, Dereham Centre, Foldens, Hagles Corners, Mount Elgin, Ostrander, Salford, Sweaburg, Verschoyle and Zenda.

Salford is a small village along Highway 19; it is surrounded by agricultural land and the Oxford landfill to the east. There are two churches, and the Salford Community Centre with a ball diamond.

Sweaburg is located five kilometers southwest of Woodstock. Its main intersection is Sweaburg Road and Dodge Line (County Roads 12 and 41). It had a public school for students up to grade three until 2009, and currently has Sweaburg United Church and cemetery, a ball diamond, and a convenience store.

The Township of Norwich is a located in Oxford County in southwestern Ontario. Oxford County Road 59 is the major north–south highway through much of the township. The local economy is largely agricultural, based on corn, soybean, and wheat production with dairy farming in the north part of the township and tobacco, vegetable, and ginseng farming to the south. Slowly, ginseng and traditional cash crops are replacing the former cash crop – tobacco, as demand shrinks.

Upon his arrival in the province in 1792, the first proclamation issued by John Graves Simcoe, the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada while still at Kingston, announced the names and boundaries he had decided upon as political boundaries for Upper Canada. For areas lying to the west of Kingston, he decided that county names would be a “mirror of Britain”. To accomplish this, the sequence of names for counties along Lake Ontario became Northumberland, Durham, York and Lincoln, and for counties along Lake Erie, the names became Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex and Kent. (This was the same sequence of county names in place along the eastern seacoast of England, running from the Scottish boundary down to the English Channel.) The proclamation defined the northern boundary of Norfolk County as being the Thames River. Norwich and Dereham townships were originally within the land area designated as belonging to Norfolk County in Upper Canada, and were named after the towns of Norwich and Dereham in Norfolk County in England.

Governor Simcoe with several other government officers, guided by a party of Six Nations warriors, conducted a wilderness tour on foot up the length of the Thames River in 1793 and decided to assign additional place names to mirror those they knew along the Thames River in England. Middlesex County was the name assigned to the area around a town site reserved at the “lower forks” in the river, to be called London; Dorchester was the name for a town site at the “middle forks”, and the area around the “upper forks” was to be Oxford – the same sequence of names as found along the Thames in England. When legislation was passed in Upper Canada in 1798 to implement these new divisions, Norwich and Dereham were separated from Norfolk County and added to the new Oxford County, which included also Burford, Blenheim, Blandford and Oxford townships – names drawn from Oxfordshire in England.

Shortly after returning from this tour, in March 1793, Simcoe received a petition from Thomas Ingersoll and associates asking for grant of a township to which they promised to bring settlers from New England. The group was granted the township of Oxford-on-the-Thames. In order to bring settlers into the wilderness area township, a road had to be built from Brantford up to the Thames River, a distance of thirty miles (forty-eight kilometers), and Thomas Ingersoll arranged that work over the course of the next two years. The first ones to become permanently settled in the township were likely Samuel Canfield Sr. and his wife and sons, who agreed to make their new home into a half-way stopping point for travelers along the road, at what became known as Oxford Centre.

Beachville was the heart of Oxford County with settlement beginning in 1791.

The Bostwicks, Ingersolls and Canfields were New England families who had made their start in the New World in the 1600s, and frontier living had been second nature to them for generations.

Settlement in the former Norwich Township came more than fifteen years after Oxford Township. The Norwich settlement was founded by two men: Peter Lossing and Peter De Long. Both men were from New York. Peter Lossing’s house was the first one in Norwich. It now stands by the old Quaker Meeting House. Both men where Quakers. The town of Norwich began as a completely Quaker settlement.

In 1799, the Township of Norwich was laid out by surveyor William Hambly into lines and concessions and 200-acre lots. The township was divided into North and South Norwich Townships in 1855.

In 1975, Oxford County underwent countywide municipal restructuring. The Village of Norwich and the Townships of East Oxford, North Norwich and South Norwich were amalgamated to create the Township of Norwich.

Norwich includes the communities of Beaconsfield, Bond’s Corners, Brown’s Corners, Burgessville, Cornell, Creditville, Curries, Eastwood, Hawtrey, Hink’s Corners, Holbrook, Milldale, Muir, Newark, New Durham, Norwich, Oriel, Otterville, Oxford Centre, Rock’s Mills, Rosanna, Springford, Summerville, Blows, and Vandecar.

Architectural Photos, Sweaburg, Ontario
Sweaburg – 484526 Sweaburg Road – Greek Revival
Architectural Photos, Salford, Ontario
Salford – 313733 Dereham Line
Architectural Photos, Verschoyle, Ontario
Verschoyle – Culloden Line – two-storey bay window, fish scale patterning and semi-circular window in gable
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
Brownsville – Ontario Cottage with center gable
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
Brownsville – #14 – voussoirs, second floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
Verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Brownsville, Ontario
# 163576 – hipped roof, cornice brackets, dichromatic voussoirs, bay window with brackets, decorative porch
Architectural Photos, Delmer, Ontario
Delmer – 312281 Dereham Line – Delmer United Church – A.D. 1900
Architectural Photos, Delmer, Ontario
Delmer – 163942 Brownsville Road
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
Beachville – 584560 Beachville Road – Gothic
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
Beachville – 434804 Zorra Line – Central Public School – Palladian window
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
584509 Beachville Road – trim on gables
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
584503 Beachville Road – hipped roof, dormers
Architectural Photos, Beachville, Ontario
Beachville District Museum – the former home of one of the managers of the Beachville quarry – The Downings
Architectural Photos, Oxford Centre, Ontario
Norwich Township, Oxford Centre, 714561 Middletown Line – Gothic – verge board trim on gable, corner quoins, dormers
Architectural Photos, Oxford Centre, Ontario
Norwich Township, Oxford Centre – 714516 Middletown Line – S.S. No. 5 – A.D. 1872
Architectural Photos, Springford, Ontario
Springford – 431 Main Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets, two-story bay windows

Zorra Township, Ontario in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Zorra Township

Zorra is a township in Oxford County in south-western Ontario. A predominantly rural municipality, Zorra was formed in 1975 through the amalgamation of East Nissouri, West Zorra and North Oxford townships. It is best known for the Highland Games weekend held each summer in Embro, celebrating the heritage of the Scottish pioneer families. The township comprises the communities of Banner, Bennington, Brooksdale, Brown’s Corners, Cody’s Corners, Dicksons Corners, Dunn’s Corner, Embro, Golspie, Granthurst, Harrington, Harrington West, Holiday, Kintore, Lakeside, Maplewood, McConkey, Medina, Rayside, Thamesford, Uniondale, Youngsville, and Zorra Station.

Among the earliest settlers of Zorra Township, were United Empire Loyalists from the New England States. Zorra was first surveyed in 1820 and Embro became a separate municipality in 1858. Embro is located on a branch of the Thames River. The first buildings were two distilleries owned by McDonald and Crittenden.

Flour, grist and oatmeal mills were built. John McDonald built a carding and cloth factory. Businesses started up: watchmaker and jeweler, boots and shoes, eight blacksmith shops, wagon and carriage makers, tinsmith, carpenters, potash manufacturer, four general stores, two cabinet makers, undertaker, three doctors, and a pump manufacturer. In 1875, Embro had two newspapers, “The Planet” and “The Review”, with a third added in 1880, “The Embro Courier”. The Embro Public Library started as a Mechanics Institute in 1882; it became a public library in 1895.

Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
137 St. Andrews Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 114 Argyle Street – verge board trim and finial on center gable of Ontario Cottage
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 70 Commissioner Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 70 Ross Street – bay window
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 76 Ross Street – iron cresting above porch, trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 87 Ross Street – Neo-Colonial – gambrel roofs
Architectural Photos, Embro, Ontario
Embro – 109 Huron Street – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gable, bay window
Architectural Photos, Medina, Ontario
Medina – Field stone, two-story bay window, corner quoins, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Kintore, Ontario
Kintore – # 195962
Architectural Photos, Kintore, Ontario
Kintore – Two-and-a-half-story bay window with verge board trim on gable, decorative cornice with brackets
Architectural Photos, Thamesford, Ontario
Thamesford – 109 Dundas Street – hipped roof, cornice brackets, two-story bay window
Architectural Photos, Thamesford, Ontario
Thamesford – #174 – two-story tower-like bay capped with a gable, fretwork
Architectural Photos, Thamesford, Ontario
Thamesford – #205 – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, corner quoins, voussoirs over windows

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 11 Picks

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 2

Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
55 King Street West – Italianate – decorative gable and cornice with brackets
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
129 King Street West – paired cornice brackets, two-story bay
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
130 King Street East – decorative cornice on house and veranda
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
143 and 145 King Street East – Neo-Colonial style with gambrel roots
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
108 Church Street
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
90 Canterbury Street – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
112 Canterbury Street – Italianate – hipped roof, paired cornice brackets, corner quoins, bay window, second-floor balcony, transom window above door
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
44 Victoria Street – Gothic Revival, verge board trim and finial on gable
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
89 Ann Street – pediment with decorative tympanum, dormer with triple windows
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
140 Ann Street – 2½-storey bay with fretwork, semi-circular window in gable, enclosed sun porch on second floor
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
145 Ann Street – multi-windowed dormer, second-floor balcony, decorative cornice, Doric pillars supporting veranda

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Ingersoll, Ontario Book 1

The town of Ingersoll is ten miles from Woodstock, twenty-one miles from London, and ninety-eight from Toronto. Ingersoll was incorporated in 1865, and by the enterprise of its inhabitants enjoyed a steady and progressive growth. Most of the town was built on the sides and summit of the high gravelly banks of the River Thames, which flows through it and supplies constant water power, of which due advantage was taken by several factories at the waterside. The town got its name from a pioneer family named Ingersoll, who were among the first settlers in this district and took a very prominent part in the early career of the community.

It was situated on the Great Western Division of the Grand Trunk Railway, and also on the Credit Valley Branch of the Canadian Pacific. The country around is fertile, and large quantities of cheese were shipped from here. The manufacture of flour and cornmeal, with woolen and planing mills, a tannery and four agricultural implement factories, formed its chief industries; grain, livestock, and general manufactured products, in addition to cheese, formed its chief shipments.

In 1886 a special effort was made to induce desirable factories to locate here and in the following year the John Morrow Machine Screw Works, the Evans Bros. and Littler Piano factory and the Hault furniture factory were secured by giving liberal bonuses. Later on, the St. Charles Condenser and the Ingersoll Nut Factory were opened.

Ingersoll was the first town in Canada to adopt the silica-barytic sidewalks in 1890 when a contract was given to Otto Guelich of Detroit, to construct a sidewalk on the east side of Thames Street from the Atlantic House to the Baptist Tabernacle, a distance of three blocks. In 1891 a local company was organized with Walter Mills as manager, and year by year the work has been carried on till now nearly every street on both sides has a nice, clean, smooth silica-barytic sidewalk, totaling about fifty miles.

Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
181 Oxford Street – This cement block house was built for R.A. Skinner who owned and operated Skinner’s Livery on the north side of Charles Street at the Oxford corner. Stained-glass panel on first floor window; pediment above porch with Doric pillars; a lion on either side of the front steps. This home was the scene of many elaborate house parties, the form of entertainment that made up the fabric of social life of the times. The Skinner Livery, sometimes referred to as the Bon Ton Livery, maintained vehicles for pleasure driving, business trips, weddings, funerals, etc.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
185 Oxford Street – This one-story Regency Cottage with a hipped roof is over one hundred years old. Its most attractive features are the front porch with the decorative fascia board, molded brackets and interesting railing construction and the two stained-glass panels in the front windows. This house was built for his sister by F. Richardson, lumber dealer and owner of a planing mill. He became involved in the lumber business around 1885 and erected or supplied lumber for many buildings in the area.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
189 Oxford Street – This large brick building, one of the older homes in this section of Oxford Street, was erected by the Christopher Brothers and occupied by Aaron Christopher for a number of years. The broad bracketed eave of the Italianate style was common in Ontario around 1860. The Christopher Brothers were well known Ingersoll contractors who built many structures, still in use in the Town (e.g. Daly House and the Anglican Church, as well as many quality homes). It has a bay window with three windows.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
213 Oxford Street – This dwelling, commonly referred to as the Gray House, was built in three sections. The angled window frame on the south side is typical of the architectural style of the 1850s and 1860s. It was purchased by Benjamin Gray in 1895 for $450.00 from John Hugi II, well known Ingersoll Photographer. At one time Benjamin Gray was the market clerk at the Town Hall and he also collected the rental fee, sometimes as low as $1.00, for the use of the auditorium. There is a cornice return on the large gable and on the pediment above the porch which is supported by square pillars.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
218 Oxford Street – This beautiful red brick home was built in 1896 for Henry G. Boyse. He owned and operated a farm near Verschoyle where he was born. Later he moved to Ingersoll and opened a flour and feed store at 70 Thames Street North. The roofing is the original Welsh Slate as is the iron work around the roof top and porch railing.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
244 Oxford Street – This white frame Victorian style house was built by Justus Miller in 1895. In the 1880s he and his brother became successful contractors for the Dominion Government, constructing such large public works as canal locks, docks, etc. After moving to Mount Elgin, he became engaged in the lumber business. The mass production of thin studs and joists replaced the massive timbers needed to frame a house. These homes were termed “Stick Style”. This house incorporated a whimsical tower, bay windows, interesting roof angles and a veranda with softly curved arches and fancy woodwork.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
250 Oxford Street – Decorative barge board (gingerbread), taken from designs found in windows of medieval churches, became a popular addition to houses in the 1860s. It was cut from three-inch-thick pine boards. The earliest barge board was more board than space but later took on a lacy look, indicating that this dwelling was built circa 1880-1890. The gables of this Victoria home are further emphasized by the addition of the finials. The original yellow brick has been painted.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
261 Oxford Street – This house built circa 1882 was one of the first to be constructed of the smooth red brick which became available at this time. The exterior walls were double bricked. Brick was also used for some of the interior wall construction which became apparent when a former owner removed two of the walls to enlarge a room. On the south side was a conservatory and green house which was replaced by a sun room. A dumb waiter, with several shelves and sliding glass doors, allowed food to be raised to the kitchen from the basement which was used as a cold storage. Originally the house had five fireplaces. Beautifully carved woodwork adorns the remaining mantles as well as the banister railing. Mr. Spencer Freeman was the original owner. Later C.W. Riley, a local cheese maker bought the property. He was the nephew of C.W. Riley Sr. “Cheese King of Western Ontario” and took over the ownership of Slawson’s Cheese Company, Ingersoll from his uncle. There is a two-story bay window; finials on gables.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
270 Oxford Street – The corner stone of this red brick Victorian home built in 1897 was discovered during renovations and bears the name “Buchanan”. The property was purchased in the early 1900s by Mr. & Mrs. G. Bartlett, clothing merchants in Ingersoll for many years. The home with its eleven-foot ceilings has four bedrooms, the original “maids” staircase and an elegant winding cherry staircase in the front hall. The fretwork design paneling and the beveled glass in the front door and in upstairs windows have been preserved.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
276 Oxford Street – Oxford Manor Retirement Home – This large yellow brick Italianate Villa style home was built circa 1880 by the Christopher Brothers and was the residence of Aaron Christopher. The design was introduced in England at the beginning of Queen Victoria’s reign as a model suburban housing for the rising mercantile class. Its main feature is the central Tuscan Tower with its tall rounded Italianate style windows and eaves.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
305 Oxford Street – This yellow brick Victorian home, built circa 1865, features a two-story detached barn where the original occupants stabled their horses and carriages. Mr. Richard Seldon and his daughter, Annie, who lived here from 1894 to 1967, served as Clerks for the Township of North Oxford. Between 1918 and 1967 residents came to the house to pay their taxes in what is now the formal dining room. High ceilings, elaborate moldings, wide baseboards and pine floors grace each of the formal rooms in the main part of the house. The brass chandeliers in the dining room and lower hall are original, as is the fireplace in the parlor. Molded cherubs decorate one of the two curved archways upstairs. The servants’ quarters were located in the rear portion of the house along with the summer kitchen which retains its original painted tin ceiling. The Seldon House with its triple brick exterior walls was built to last. It has paired cornice brackets, a second-floor balcony, and two-story bay windows.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
310 Oxford Street – This Neo-Gothic style home referred to as the “Gayfer House” was built in 1863 by Noxon. Except for the removal of a wrought iron fence bordering the street, the house from the front appears as it did when first built. In the early 1900s the rear wing was demolished and a sun room, pantry and rear vestibule were erected using the original brick. The three chimneys are chimney flues and ventilation chimneys. The original roofing was slate. Guy Lumbardo played in this house for the “Coming Out” party of Dorothy Gayfer with over two hundred invited guests. According to a granddaughter of John Gayfer, the tower was used for learning to smoke! The land and premises were purchased by Louise and John Gayfer (a well-known Ingersoll druggist) in 1881 and remained in the Gayfer family until the 1960s.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
316 Oxford Street – Many of the features of a Tudor style house have been incorporated in this home, including the patterned brick work, interesting chimney treatment, groups of rectangular windows, and complex roof line with many gables. Straight clean lines and design are typical. The home was built in 1937 and given to Harold and Lorna Wilson by his father E.A. Wilson as a wedding present. The Wilson family owned the Ingersoll Machine & Tool Company and were also involved in speed boat racing. In 1939 Harold won the President’s Cup with his craft “Miss Canada”, making the first time in U.S. boat racing history that the cup was won by a foreigner. Harold is included in the Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
189 Thames Street South – The Smith House – James Smith emigrated from Scotland in 1862. Shortly after his arrival in Ingersoll, he married Alice Galliford, daughter of John Galliford, Ingersoll’s first reeve. They moved into this house which was a small one-story cottage at the time. As the family grew to include nine children, a wing was built on the south side which included a kitchen and a dining room. A second story containing five bedrooms was also added. John admired the mansard roof line of the newly completed Niagara District Bank across the street and he incorporated a similar roof line in his second-story addition. When indoor plumbing was added, one of the bedrooms was converted into a bathroom.
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
120 Charles Street West – dichromatic brickwork
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
112 Albert Street – two-story frontispiece, iron cresting above entrance door
Architectural Photos, Ingersoll, Ontario
415 Harris Street – Elm Hurst Inn & Spa – 1872 – sidelights and transom windows surrounding double entrance doors, bay window, oriel window, tower, verge board trim on gables

Tavistock and Innerkip and Area in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Tavistock and Innerkip and Area

Tavistock is located 15 kilometers southeast of Stratford and five kilometers south of Shakespeare on County Road 59. In 1848, Captain Henry Eckstein founded Tavistock. The world championship crokinole tournament has been held here annually since 1999.

Innerkip is located on Oxford Road 29 north of Highway 401, northeast of Woodstock.

Huntingford is located on County Road 59, north of Woodstock, west of Innerkip.

Punkeydoodles Corners is located four miles east of Tavistock. Today the corner has a scattering of houses and farms. At one time it was a bustling stop along the Huron Road. The most popular legend about how it got its name is from the song “Yankee Doodle Dandy” which was popular in the 1800s and often sung around the piano at the inn and tavern located at the Corner during the late nineteenth century. Today, the corner is the meeting place of three districts – Oxford County, Perth County and the Region of Waterloo.

Hickson is located at the intersection of Highway 59 and County Road 8, about thirteen kilometers north of Woodstock and ten kilometers south of Tavistock. Hickson was founded in 1876 when the Port Dover and Lake Huron Railway created a whistle-stop here. The new village was named after Sir Joseph Hickson, the general manager of the Grand Trunk Railway.

Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
Tavistock – 52 Woodstock Street South – The Glass Swan – This late Italianate style has existed since 1892 when Dr. Otto Niemeier bricked over two adjoining structures. This residence is one of the oldest remaining in Tavistock and was the location of several early merchants and doctors.
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
#6 – paired cornice brackets under the eaves
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
#18 – Queen Anne style – three-story tower, Doric pillars supporting veranda with pediment
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
28 Hope Street West – hipped roof with dormer, pediment
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
44 Hope Street West – verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
# 45 – Hillcroft – A lovely yellow brick Queen Anne, with an interesting variation of roof pitches; beautiful Neoclassical pillar details
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
Yellow brick, two story – verge board, cornice brackets
Architectural Photos, Tavistock, Ontario
94 William Street – The Maples Home for Seniors – Second Empire – mansard roof, dormers, drip molds and keystones, bay window
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
182 Blandford Street – built in 1867 – first owner Charles Vincent – two story frame house with a stone front and a decorative roof with dormers
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
172 Blandford Street – built 1855 – 2 story home with stone foundation, gingerbread trim on the center gable, a porch on each floor. The owners welcomed us, showed their home and shared a picnic lunch with us in their backyard.
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
134 Blandford Street – built 1880 – 2 story yellow brick with red brick corners quoins and red brick above windows, gingerbread trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
132 Coleman Street – Gothic – built 1888 – 2 story stone building, steel roof, verge board trim on gable
Architectural Photos, Innerkip, Ontario
Two-story stone building with hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Huntingford, Ontario
Huntingford – Gothic Style, yellow brick, two story
Architectural Photos, Hickson, Ontario
Victorian style, 2 story, bay windows on lower level, yellow brick, balcony above porch, quoining, voussoirs, decorative brickwork
Architectural Photos, Hickson, Ontario
Yellow brick, two-story home with bay windows on each corner, paired cornice brackets under the eaves, hipped roof

Woodstock, Ontario Book 4 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Woodstock, Ontario Book 4

Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
33 Light Street – c. 1869 – Queen Anne – two story with attic, red brick, slate roof with fish scale slate on towers, gable roof, styled stone lintel, keystone and drip course above windows and doorways, corbel cornice encircle the house at the eaves, dormer casement window in gable has pediment lintel, paired windows in square tower and wall dormer, square tower has steep hip roof, circular tower has cone roof, double door topped with segmental transom
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
39 Light Street – c. 1861 – symmetrical two story, red brick, trunked hip roof, dormer with verge board and paired brackets, corbel bricking on chimneys, central window has stone lintel and basket weave bricks in semi-circle above window, soldier styled drip course, central door has ellipse shaped transom, paired Doric columns support open porch
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
77 Light Street – 1878 – Italianate – two story, white brick, trunked hip roof, decorative cornice with dentils, paired brackets, cut stone lentils on windows, shutters, closed front porch has semi-circular heading, door has tear-drop windows, open balcony. James Hay established the Hay and Company in 1893, which specialized in plywood and veneer materials, later known as Weldwood. Active in Municipal affairs, he was Deputy Reeve and later Mayor 1893-1894. One of the early founders and directors of the Woodstock Board of Trade in 1877, he also built Woodstock’s first waterworks to eliminate typhoid and provide fire protection. He was the first citizen in Woodstock to install telephones in his home and business in 1879.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
81 Light Street – c. 1849 – Gothic – symmetrical 1½ story, white stucco, gable roof, paired wall door and central gable have ribbon verge board, single brackets; one-over-one Gothic, flat and semi-circular windows, shutters; central paired front door, collared tapered Doric columns support pediment decorated open verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
93 Light Street – c. 1849 – Modern Tudor architectural style – two-story, rug brick, trunked roof, shed dormer, off-centered door
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
107 Light Street – c. 1882 – Italianate – two story, red brick, trunked hip roof, single brackets, two-story bay window, off-centered double doors, collared square posts support open verandah and open balcony
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
157 Light Street – built in 1875 – Queen Anne style with varied roof line, decorated verge board on gables, dormers and tower; second-floor balcony
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
165 Light Street – c. 1874 – Italianate – symmetrical two story, white brick, hip roof, paired brackets equally distributed, side lights and transom flank centered door
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
246 Light Street – c. 1877 – Italianate – two story, buff brick with red brick decorated quoins and string course, hip roof with single and paired brackets and dentils, segmental arch windows with decorated shutters, two-story bay window, porch with turned posts supports balcony, door has ellipse shape transom
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
247 Light Street – c. 1884 – Second Empire, two story, red brick (painted), decorated painted wood shingles on Mansard roof, brick string course and recessed bricking beneath 1st story bay window, double front door with transom is protected by new porch, cut field stone foundation
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
288 Light Street – c. 1861 – Edwardian – two story with attic, red brick, hip roof with gable roof over second story bay window and front extension, painted red wood shingles in gable end with Palladian windows, delicate dentils at roof and porch cornice, two large rectangular windows are topped with beautiful semi-circular stained glass windows, all windows have stone sills and keystone arched brick to match semi-circular windows, tapered Doric pillars support open porch with a small balcony which has turned posts with turned balusters, cut stone foundation
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
81 Perry Street – c. 1875 – designated – Italianate, builder was William Thompson – two story, yellow brick, quoins, trunked hip roof, flat roof closed porch, with decorative paired bracket with semi-circular one-over-one windows, cement platform porch with aluminum railing
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
606 Peel Street – c. 1875 – symmetrical one-story Regency cottage with finished attic, red brick now painted, trunked hip roof, front hip dormer, continuance of roof forms roof of verandah

Woodstock, Ontario Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Woodstock, Ontario Book 3

Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
415 Hunter Street – 1892 – County Court House – Richardsonian Romanesque style -2½ story, rose sandstone with white sandstone lintels and drip molding, steep pitch irregular slate roof, wall dormers with parapet walls topped with finial, semi-circular windows above double hung windows, recessed double doors, framed with Roman arch, supported by pillars, two pillars have carved monkey heads, 2,2 story semi-circular bay windows, large stone newel posts flank stairs, towers, turrets and elaborate chimneys, Centenary stone mounted in the central buttress
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
445 Hunter Street – Public Library – built in 1909 – Beaux-Arts Classicism style – brick, stucco on details such as quoins, columns, portico, Corinthian order columns with flutes, formed metal cornice, flat roof, Carnegie library
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
410 Hunter Street – Neo-Classical Revival – Central Public School – built in 1880 – two story with usable attic, deep wood eaves with decorated brackets, parapet with broken cornice above main entrance, first floor window ellipse and double hung, second floor semi-circular, double front door with ellipse transom, name of school in stone above doorway on second floor, decorated trunked chimneys with corbel bricking, three entrances – boys, girls and teachers lead to large spacious halls, all reached by steps
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
39 Vansittart Avenue – 1880 – Harry H. Powell, President Woodstock Gas and Light Company – Italianate – two story, painted brick, some bricks have paw prints, hip roof, decorative dentils between paired brackets, one-story bay window, decorative shutters, off-centered door, turned posts, sunburst spindles, turned balusters, L shape verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
81 Vansittart Avenue – Colonial Revival – symmetrical two story with attic, dull red brick, gable roof has a pair of dormers separated by triangular window, stone sills and lintels, centered door with segmental top flanked with side lights and ellipse transom, oriel 4-over-4 windows supported with paired thick brackets
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
84 Vansittart Avenue – It was built in 1864 by Mr. Thomas H. Parker, a prominent merchant and first president of the Board of Trade in 1877. Mr. Parker was Mayor of Woodstock in 1878 and 1879. In 1911, Mr. M. W. Rowell was leader of the Ontario Liberal Party and resided here during his term as provincial member for Oxford. Italianate villa – two story with attic, white brick, low pitch gable roof, deep eaves supported by paired brackets, windows grouped, first floor 2-over-2 flat, second floor 1-over-1 flat, decorative wooden lintels, sills supported with brackets, semi-circular windows on second floor, door in tower, segmental transom, hood supports balcony, Doric columns support side verandah, squared off-centered tower has hip roof ending in decorative finial
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
114 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1888 – Queen Anne – 1½ story, red brick, painted blue shingles on gables, gable roof, decorated cantilever brackets on gables, one-story bay window, second floor semi-circular window, off-centered door, sturdy brick pillars support L shape verandah, cantilever brackets
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
122 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1885 – Italianate, Edwardian – two story, red brick, decorative brick string course, hip roof, dentils with paired brackets on corners, off-centered door, stained glass transom, sturdy brick pillars support verandah, decorative string course, corbel bricking on chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
123 Vansittart Avenue – c. 1860s – Neo-classical – two story, trunked hip roof, single brackets, 9-over-9 flat windows, off-centered door flanked by side lights and rectangular transom, turned posts and spindles and balusters support verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
133 Vansittart Avenue – Gothic Revival – 1½ story, white brick, steep pitched gable roof with decorative paired exposed rafters, Gothic wall dormers and roof ends decorated with finials, flat windows grouped, centered door, rectangular transom, decorative shutters, paired square pillars support open verandah
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
140 Vansittart Avenue – Tudor Revival style – 1½ story, stucco/timber in gables, salt box roof and gable roof at rear with gable wall dormer, multi-lights in grouped casement windows, off-centered door
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
209 Vansittart Avenue – Vernacular – two story with apartments in attic, steep gable roof, south window has diamond lights with lead muntins, pediment verandah is half open and half closed with shingle sides and wood piers
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
210 Vansittart Avenue – built in 1895 by Thomas Leopold “Carbide” Wilson, inventor of the first commercial calcium-carbide process for the manufacturer of acetylene gas. It was the residence of the Sisters of St. Joseph’s until 1975. It is a voluptuous two-story house with finished attic of irregular shape in Richardsonian Romanesque style using contrasting brick, cut stone and hanging tiles – stone main floor, red brick second floor; steep red slate roof, red tiles in gable end and small casement windows, several balconies, large shed roof verandah, brick posts, turned balusters, lattice skirt, a porte-cochere for people to be protected from weather when leaving buggy or cars, off-set tower
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
487 Princess Street – This house was constructed by Ralph Bickerton, carpenter and builder, as his family home in 1881. His sons, William John, Robert George, and James Graham, established in 1885 the nationally-known Bickerton Brothers Harness and Saddlery business. Italianate, Neo-classical – symmetrical full two story, red brick, dichromatic brick accent, trunked hip roof, decorative pediment above entrance, paired brackets on wide cornice with dentils, decorative shutters, centered door with etched glass transom, Doric columns support classical pediment roof

Woodstock, Ontario Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Woodstock, Ontario Book 2

Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
10 Wellington Street South – Italianate, hipped roof, cornice brackets, pillared verandah supports, dentil molding on verandah cornice, spindles on verandah surround
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
45 Wellington Street South – c. 1853 – L shape, 1½ story, white brick, gable roof, has delicate verge board with central pendant post, 2-over-2 windows on second floor, 1-over-1 rectangular window in pairs on main floor, shutters, one-story bay, bell roof over door with a rectangular transom
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
57 Wellington Street South – Edwardian, Ionic capitals on verandah pillar supports
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
62 Wellington Street South – c. 1874 – Italianate – L shape two-story, white brick with decorative quoins, trunked hip roof, deep eaves with wide cornice, dentils, smaller paired brackets and larger single brackets, paired chimneys, 2/2 segmental windows, one-story bay window, door has segmental transom protected with roof supported on large brackets
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
95 Wellington Street South – c. 1853 – Neo-classical – square, symmetrical full two-story, buff brick, hip roof, 3-over-3 bays, 2-over-2 rectangular double hung windows, decorative aluminum shutters
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
36 Wellington Street North – c. 1854 -Queen Anne – full two-story with attic, red brick, gable roof, two hip roofs with dormers, two-story bay window with gable roof, verge board with pendant posts and large brackets, porch and balcony have turned posts, spindles, lattice and brick-a-brac, string course is patterned brickwork, six-sided two-story tower with steep hip roof topped with finial, paired post support gable roof side porch
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
82 Wellington Street North – The Neo-Classical designed house and coach house were built for the family of Jennet (McDonald) and Homer Pratt Brown in 1860. In 1844 Brown became a partner with the Woodstock Foundry (515 Dundas Street). Brown was a member of town council, Mayor in 1861 and County Treasurer for many years. The sills and supporting lintels were metal and made at Brown’s foundry. Since Brown was an active member of the Masonic Lodge there is an emblem of the Eastern Star, as a window, found in the pediment above the front door. The squared, paired, Doric pillars frame the front porch which shelters a rectangular transom and side lights which are divided into many rectangular lights. Decorative brackets in pairs add symmetry to the design. Each window has a decorative lintel; above the second-story front hall window, there is a larger stone lintel with an English Rose on each side of acanthus leaves; small brackets of acanthus leaves support the lintel.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
419 Drew Street – c. 1886 – Edwardian, Tudor Revival – two story with attic, red brick, filled in balcony in half timber, patterned grey slate gable roof, projecting eaves with thick cornice, variety of styled windows, large semi-circular window in upper floor with brick headings, keystones, centered door protected by open large brick piers, porch with closed balcony, 2 rows of dog tooth string course, brick lintels, decorative brickwork on chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
405 Drew Street – c. 1891 – T. McClay, builder – Romanesque – large two story with attic, red brick, trunked grey slate hip roof with painted green wooden shingles in gables, projecting eaves, curved corners with brackets, front gables, center square tower supported by Roman arch is topped by a finial, four arched windows in tower, triptych window, large semi-elliptical shape window on main floor, flat 1/1 double hung stained glass window on upper floor, flat 1/1 double hung windows are topped with stained glass, center door is found beneath arches of tower, ellipse stained glass transom, open side porch with turned wooden balusters; decorative, horizontal parallel brick lines on both floors; corbel bricks cornice edge of tower and chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
376 Drew Street – c. 1852 – Edwardian – L shape two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof with one gable dormer and one gable both with green painted shingles in a pattern, gable end has Palladian window with decorated cornice in apex, center door is protected by square piers, open porch
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
321 Drew Street – c. 1860 – Ontario Vernacular – 1½ story, buff brick, front gable roof, decorative verge board, string course, drip molding and decorative corbel bricking frame, semi-circular 1/1 windows, small square colored glass in front windows, side porch with turned posts, spindles and brackets, flat roof with shingle skirt protects closed and open porch, slat skirt
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
315 Drew Street –c. 1855 – Queen Anne – two story with attic, red brick, trunked hip roof, oriel roof on side of house, gable roof above two story bay window, decorative dentils, triangular window in gable, top light stained glass, hip roof on open balcony supported by Doric pillars, closed verandah with gable roof on porch with Doric columns, corbel bricking on chimney
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
385 Brant Street – The dwelling was built about 1890 for Thomas A. McCleneghan, Deputy Postmaster and son of Alex R. McCleneghan (81 Perry Street) who was Postmaster. The dwelling is of the Regency style, 1½ stories, low hip roof and cottage appearance. The center door, flanked by large square windows, is typical of this style. The front entrance is flanked by three windows topped with an ellipse shape segmented head window. On the front porch, the ellipse and square designs are repeated in the lattice work. The brick work features beautiful brick work in the drip molding and chimney. Other details include a rectangular patterned verge board, an iron-crested bay window accented with a pair of finals and a continually repeated pattern or rectangular patterns in windows and brickwork. The McCleneghan family were active in the business and social life of Woodstock and contributed greatly to the development of the city. It remained in that family until about 1920 when it was sold to Robert S. Bickle, President and Founder of the Bickle Fire Engine Ltd. Mr. Robert S. Bickle was a pioneer in the manufacture of fire trucks and firefighting apparatus in Canada. His company prospered and provided equipment of the highest standard to industries and municipalities throughout the country. As the business expanded it became allied with the Seagrave Company of Columbus Ohio, becoming known as Bickle-Seagrave Ltd. and later King-Seagrave Ltd. Mr. R. S. Bickle was succeeded by his nephew, V.B. King. The company further expanded to include King Trailers Ltd. and also Truck Engineering Ltd. In 1954, it was purchased by Herbert Webster, Field man for the Ontario Co-operative Milk Producers.
Architectural Photos, Woodstock, Ontario
543 Henry Street – Canadian National Railway Station – built 1880 – now VIA – gables with verge board trim, corner quoins, fretwork with trefoil cut outs