Author

Vernon, Chase, Salmon Arm, British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 16 Picks

Vernon, Chase, Salmon Arm, British Columbia in Colour Photos

Vernon is a city in the Okanagan region of the southern interior of British Columbia. Named after Forbes George Vernon, a former Member of the Legislative Assemblyof British Columbia who helped found the famed Coldstream Ranch nearby.It is the oldest city in the Okanagan Valley and celebrates its history and heritage with the larger-than-life display of twenty-six murals painted on the walls of its downtown buildings.

The Okanagan people settled around the city’s two lakes, Okanagan Lake and Swan Lake, obtaining seasonal sources of food. Fur traders camped in Vernon as it started to develop in 1863, following a gold discovery at the Cherry Creek, Monashee Mountains, Mission Creek and east side of the Okanagan Lake. Vernon was home to many cattle ranches and fruit orchards.

Vernon expanded after the Canadian Pacific Railway was opened in the Okanagan and Shuswap regions in 1891. The stern-wheeler S.S. Aberdeen was launched by the Canadian Pacific Railway for use on Okanagan Lake in 1893 connecting Vernon to Penticton at the south end of Okanagan Lake, and points between.

Chase is located at the outlet of Little Shuswap Lake which is the source of the South Thompson River. Chase Creek, which drops over three small waterfalls before flowing through the town, enters the South Thompson just below the lake’s outlet. The main industries in Chase are forestry and tourism.

The town was named after a flamboyant character named Whitfield Chase, an American from New York State. After originally coming to Canada during the 1858 gold rush he settled in the area in 1865. He was the first non-native settler that farmed and raised a family, in what was then called, The Shuswap Prairie.

Sorrento is on the south shore of Shuswap Lake, 28 kilometers west of Salmon Arm and 80 kilometers east of Kamloops. You can fish in the lake, enjoy water sports and boating, and view scenic landscapes.

Salmon Arm is located on Shuswap Lake midway between Calgary and Vancouver on the Trans-Canada Highway. It has the longest curved wooden wharf in North America which draws tourists from around the World.

By 1904, Salmon Arm had acquired a reputation for having an excellent fruit harvest. The local businessmen grew fruit as a main export, sending it to the larger, more populated towns that surrounded it.

Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 3302 27th Street – Beairsto Elementary School was known as Central School when it was built in Vernon in 1909. The brick building was three stories high with an auditorium on the third floor. A north wing in stucco was added in 1939 and a south wing was added in 1946. Harold K. Beairsto was principal from 1925 to 1961; when he retired the name of the school was changed to honor him. Beairsto Elementary School is still operating as a school and is the center for Vernon’s elementary French Immersion program. The main entrance is accentuated by a Georgian arch and the Mansard roof is topped by an octagonal cupola and framed by large chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 3001 27th Street – Vernon Law Courts – This second court house for Vernon was designed by T. Hooper and was started in 1910. It was built in the Classical Revival style of local granite from a quarry at Okanagan Landing. The first court case was heard in 1914.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 2203 30th Avenue – This impressive Queen Anne house features and octagonal tower, fish scale shingles, deep eaves and bay windows. The Campbells were long-established furniture dealers.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 2301 32nd Avenue – The steeply pitched Mansard roof of the Mohr House permits full use of the attic. It was built in 1893 for a wood-turner at Smith and Clerin’s Sawmill.
Architectural Photos, Vernon, British Columbia
Vernon – 2003 37th Avenue – C.B. Lefroy, rancher, later notary public and realtor had this home built in 1905. The hip-on-gable roof and highly decorated barge boards in the gable ends create a picturesque cottage-like effect. At one time the house was part of Miss Le Gallais’ School for Girls founded in 1913. Miss Topham-Brown, who came to Vernon in 1917, worked here as housekeeper, cook, games coach and drawing instructor prior to opening her own studio. She was an enthusiast supporter of the arts until her death in 1974.
Chase, British Columbia
Chase – Shuswap Lake
Sorrento, British Columbia
Sorrento – Shuswap Lake taken from Caen Road Community Park
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – Salmar Classic Theatre was built in 1949 using a Quonset design which was developed during World War II. It is circular in shape and constructed of corrugated steel sheets bolted together into a half circle arch form.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 20 Hudson Avenue NE – The old Courthouse, constructed in 1930, is a two-story brick and stucco building with gable dormers and half timbering. It has an arched entryway and portico, decorative eave brackets and carved barge boards.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 20 Hudson Avenue NE – The Municipal Hall is a one-story brick building with a gable roof, gable dormers and a brick chimney.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 70 Hudson Avenue NE – The Post Office, completed in 1937, is a one-story flat-roofed brick building with a raised stepped parapet in an Art Deco style including arched Palladian windows. The Post Office moved to a new location in 1974; the building was used as a library for nearly twenty years and now houses the Shuswap Art Gallery.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 251 5th Street SE – Skeleton House was built in 1912. Bob Skelton was Manager of the Salmon Arm Cooperative Creamery and the city mayor. It has a large gabled roof with lower-sloped “skirts” at the eaves. There are two gable-roofed dormers (one front, one back) each with the same lower-sloped eave details as found on the main gable.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 721 Harris Street – The M.M. Carroll House was built in 1909 and is an excellent example of pre-First-World-War bungalow design. Carroll was a plumber, tin-smith, undertaker and theater owner. It has a gable roof with dormer extensions at the top level; the windows are double hung and have upper lite multi-panes. The front verandah has bevel-sided half walls with cased posts, moldings and curved cased beams.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 720 Harris Street – The Collier House is a 1½ story cross-gabled house in the low Craftsman bungalow style. There are knee braces supporting the gable end eaves.
Architectural Photos, Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – 680 Harris Street – The Lyman House was built about 1908 in the Dutch Colonial style.
Salmon Arm, British Columbia
Salmon Arm – The wharf is one of the iconic features of Salmon Arm.

Osoyoos British Columbia in Colour Photos – My Top 15 Picks

Osoyoos British Columbia in Colour Photos

The South Okanagan Valley is located at the northernmost tip of the upper Sonoran Desert system which starts in Mexico and extends through North America as the Great Basin. Because of the low rainfall and a very sandy soil, desert plants grow in the region. Osoyoos is surrounded by hills blanketed in sage and pine forest. The valley sides and bottomlands have orchards that produce the earliest fruit in Canada as well as great wines. Early agricultural production in the Okanagan-Similkameen region was focused mainly on cattle ranching as the local environment was well suited to cattle grazing and provided beef to expanding communities.

Ranching in the Okanagan Valley got its start in the 1860s when Osoyoos customs officer Judge John Carmichael Haynes levied duties on the herds of cattle that were being driven from the United States to the Cariboo gold fields. Many of the cattle drovers could not afford to pay these duties, and thus paid Haynes with cattle. Haynes kept some of the cattle for himself, and sold some to other early settlers.

Until the construction of the Kettle Valley Railroad in 1915, the cattle had to be herded over the treacherous mountain trails in order to reach the markets. Once the K.V.R. was constructed, the cattle had only to be driven to Penticton, where they were loaded into boxcars and shipped to the meat processing plants in Vancouver. The ranching process was facilitated further in 1943, with the establishment of the first stockyard in Okanagan Falls.

Osoyoos means “a place where two lakes come together.” In 1811 the first white men in their search for furs came here and established a fur trading post. Cattle ranching, mining and lumbering followed. In 1907 the first commercial fruit orchard was planted because it was the warmest place in Canada. The community nestles along Lake Osoyoos which is twelve miles long and at an elevation of only 912 feet above sea level.

With its orchard setting, lakes and mountains, the likeness to the county of Spain is apparent. This sparked the community to adopt a Spanish theme.

The Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre celebrates the precious cultural heritage of the Osoyoos Indian Band and explores their desert landscapes. The site is fifty acres of sage grasslands and ponderosa pine forest. The name NK’MIP (Inkameep) means “gateway or doorway to the bottom of the lake system.” The Inkameep lived off the land, lakes and rivers. They hunted, fished and grew crops and gave thanks to the ‘Great Spirit’ for the seasons and the bounty they shared. The Osoyoos Indian Band was a trading nation and developed trade with bands farther north in the Okanagan Valley and the Colville Band in Washington.

Nk’Mip Cellars became a reality under the leadership and vision of Chief Clarence Louie. His tenacity as an entrepreneur is upheld by his passion for his people and their place within the Canadian economy. Sam Baptiste, General Manager of Inkameep Vineyards is recognized as one of the best wine growers in this British Columbia region.

Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
A kinetic sculpture pays homage to the Okanagan First Nation of the area
Architectural Photos, Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Mountain Sheep
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Wolf howling, bear below
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Soopalallie (also called soap berries) are berries gathered from May to July and whipped with water into “Indian ice cream”, a pinkish-white froth resembling beaten egg whites. Jinxed people drank a brew of soopalallie and wild raspberries to change their luck.
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Antelope Brush is a member of the rose family. The Okanagan People used this plant as a detoxifying cleanser. The branches were used to make hot fires during winter camping trips. The shrub is an important browse plant for deer and bighorn sheep. Chipmunks, ground squirrels and mice eat its seeds.
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Harry in front of the Ponderosa Pine
Osoyoos, British Columbia
The desert was in bloom for us – not too hot when we were there. Long Leaved Phlox – Growing among the sagebrush, phlox is the longest blooming native spring flower. The showy pink to white flowers appear in April and last through mid-June. The Okanagan People used this plant for treating anemia in children.
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Osoyoos, British Columbia
Spotted Lake is located on Highway 3 and is sacred to the Okanagan First Nations People. The peculiar blue, green and yellow spots on the surface of the lake are formed from high concentrations of minerals and salt as the water level evaporates and drops.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 9 – My Top 7 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 9

Lockport is a small community in Manitoba located twenty-eight kilometers north of the city of Winnipeg. The community is a part of both the Rural Municipalities of St. Andrews (west of the river), and St. Clements (east of the river). Lockport is an ancient settlement, predating European history by thousands of years. It is one of the oldest known settlements in Canada. Flocks of the North American White Pelican are often seen.

The Red River Floodway joins the Red River just north of the dam. The bridge and locks at Lockport (completed in 1910), submerged the St. Andrews Rapids (a natural obstruction to the south) in order to make the Red River navigable through to Lake Winnipeg.

We enjoyed lunch at the Half Moon Restaurant.

South along River Road is St Andrews Church and Rectory. The Church is the oldest operating church in Western Canada. Kennedy House, also located on River Road, was built by Captain William Kennedy in 1866.

Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
3 St. Andrews Road – Parish Church of St. Andrew – established 1828 – The church was built in 1844-49 in the Gothic Revival style. The walls were constructed from local limestone from the river bank. St. Andrew’s Church is the oldest church in continuous use in Western Canada.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
River Road – The Kennedy House – Eleanor called it “Maple Grove” – cobblestone house built in 1866 with large windows, French doors, and modified Gothic gables. Eleanor and William lived here with their children William and Mary. William farmed and kept a trading store on the adjacent north lot. The Kennedy House, in the Rural Municipality of St. Andrews, was built in 1866 for Captain William Kennedy using stones quarried from the Red River banks at nearby St. Andrews Rapids. The Gothic Revival style of the Kennedy House is architecturally distinctive, compared to the other old stone houses built in the Red River Settlement, which reflect Georgian influences. By contemporary Eastern Canadian or British standards Kennedy House was simple and unadorned. By Red River Settlement standards, however, it was very fashionable. William Kennedy (1814-1890) was an Arctic explorer, missionary, and a Hudson’s Bay Company employee. He was born at Cumberland House on the Saskatchewan River in April 1814, the son of Alexander Kennedy, a Hudson’s Bay Company Chief Factor, and an aboriginal woman, Agathas Margaret (Mary) Bear. When he was thirteen, he was sent to Orkney for his education. In 1836 he entered the employ of the Hudson’s Bay Company and was stationed on the Ungava Coast. He left the Company’s service in 1848 and went to Canada West where he engaged in his own business, and began to lobby for the expansion of Canada into the north-west. As a lad at Cumberland House he had met Sir John Franklin, and in 1850 he offered his services to Lady Franklin to help in the search for the Franklin expedition. He commanded two of the Franklin search expeditions and discovered the Arctic passage known as Bellot Strait. He was the first to use dogs and sleds from an exploring ship. In 1853, he presented a paper on these adventures to the Royal Geographical Society in London, England, and wrote a book entitled A Short Narrative of the Second Voyage of The Prince Albert in search of Sir John Franklin. In 1856, with George Brown’s support, he resumed his efforts to link the Red River Settlement and Canada West by a northern route. About 1860 he settled at Fairford, on Lake Manitoba, as an Anglican missionary and teacher to the Indians. In 1861 he settled at St. Andrew’s on the Red, where he was for a time employed by the Hudson’s Bay Company as a storekeeper at Lower Fort Garry. He was an early advocate of a railway to Hudson’s Bay. About 1859, he married Eleanor E. Cripps and they had two children. Crippled by rheumatism for most of his remaining years he lived a very retired life at St. Andrew’s. He died at his home on January 25, 1890.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
St. Andrews Lock and Dam
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
Half Moon Restaurant Mural
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
St. Nicholas Ukrainian Orthodox Church at Gonor – The history of the St. Nicholas Parish begins in the year 1896-1897 when immigrants from Bukowina, Ukraine settled in the Gonor district. The Gonor district was already established by a Jesuit Missionary, called Father de Gonnor, who through his efforts, assisted la Verendrye, the explorer, and some years later, the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1877. As the Ukrainian settlers emigrated to Canada, one of the terminal depots was in East Selkirk, and from this point they traveled and walked to settle along the bank of the Red River in the Gonor district. Faith, physical strength, and hope, were their assets, and the church and religion were very important in the lives of these early pioneers. They desired a church building where they could open up their hearts to God. These early settlers made plans for the construction of the first church in 1904. The church and belfry were made of logs, which were brought in from the area. In April 1944, both the original church building and manse were destroyed by an accidental grass fire. The original belfry containing the bell from Bukowina was saved and is still in use today. The present church is about 1,100 square feet in area, is built of lumber and it is in the form of Byzantine architecture. Mr. Anton Prychun, a resident of Tyndall, Manitoba, was the master builder. All labor, with the exception of the head carpenter and painter, was provided free of charge. The church was painted and decorated in the following manner: The ceiling has sky-blue oil paint spangled with white stars. The dome has cherubim angels on and between clouds on a sky-blue background. The altar is painted in a similar manner. The walls are a cream color and a border is stenciled in a Ukrainian motif throughout the church. The Ikonastos consists of the picture of Jesus crucified at Golgotha, the Last Supper, and the twelve apostles and is painted and decorated in the Eastern Ukrainian Greek Orthodox style.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
6297 Henderson Highway – Ukrainian Parish of Catholic Holy Trinity, St. Clements – 1952 – Around 1890, a large influx of Ukrainian settlers was emigrating to Canada which led to the establishment of Ukrainian Catholic parishes. The first Holy Trinity Ukrainian Catholic Church was started in 1899, in the traditional Byzantine, rite style, in the form of a cross. The current church of brick and stucco structure, with its two radiant stainless-steel domes, which could be seen from miles around, was built 1952-1953.
Architectural Photos, Lockport, Manitoba
5635 Henderson Highway – St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Narol was founded in 1911 by immigrants from the Brody area in Galicia. Like most Rusins/Western Ukrainians, these pioneers had been Greek Catholic in their homeland, which at that time belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Upon their arrival in Canada, the people reunited with the Orthodox Church of their forebears, becoming a part of the Russian Orthodox Mission.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 8 – My Top 9 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 8

The Forks in Winnipeg has been a meeting place for over 6,000 years. Nestled in the heart of downtown, The Forks is one of Winnipeg’s most beloved places, at the junction of the Assiniboine and mighty Red Rivers. Early Aboriginal people traded at The Forks, followed by European fur traders, Métis buffalo hunters, Scottish settlers, riverboat workers, railway pioneers and tens of thousands of immigrants. The Forks’ unique history is apparent in its bustling market. Originally two adjacent stables for competing rail companies circa early 1900, the horse stalls were joined together by a courtyard and bridges to create The Forks Market.

The Forks Market offers a multitude of shops to browse for a wide variety of specialty items and souvenirs. Downstairs, The Market features a fresh food emporium with everything from gourmet cheeses to meats, organic baked goods and wine. Upstairs, in the Market Loft, shoppers will find items ranging from cigars and aromatherapy products to crafts and artworks from three hundred local and Canadian artisans. A constantly changing array of artisans and vendors also sell their wares at day tables inside The Forks Market and outside on The Plaza.

Across the courtyard from the Forks Market is the four-story Johnston Terminal building. Originally constructed in 1930, the terminal was a warehouse and freight-forwarding facility. After a substantial addition in 1930, the warehouse was at the time one of the largest in Winnipeg. It was occupied by National Storage and Cartage until 1961, and was leased to the Johnston National Cartage Company for the next fifteen years. Vacated in 1977, the building was unoccupied until the redevelopment of the site into The Forks.

The building is now home to a variety of specialty boutiques and stores, offices, a café, Finn McCue’s and The Old Spaghetti Factory. The basement of the building hosts the Johnston Terminal Antique Mall, which features over thirty consignees and new merchandise brought in daily.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
241 Yale Avenue
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
288 Yale Avenue – dormers, pediment, bay window
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
283 Yale Avenue – English Manor house – Jacobean gable
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
37 Kingsway – Neo-colonial – gambrel roof
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
29 Ruskin Row – The house, built for businessman Robert Ross Scott, is a grand brick and wood-frame structure built in 1914 in Crescentwood, one of Winnipeg’s early affluent neighborhoods. It is a fine interpretation of a Tudor Revival-style residence. Designed by John N. Semmens, the large dwelling is distinguished by several characteristics of the style, including a steeply pitched roof line with cross gables and dormers, massive chimneys, masonry and stuccoed walls with decorative half-timbering and multi-paned windows including sash, casement, oriel and bay windows in wood frames. The 2½-storey house has an off-center front entrance porch topped by a balcony. The load-bearing brick base is finished in red-brown brick with header detailing. Other details include barge boards and wood finials on the gable ends, stone lug sills, pilaster strips and detailed brickwork around the front entrance.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
2 Ruskin Row – corner quoins, pediment above door
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Palk Road – balustrade

Near the convergence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers is a natural shallow amphitheater known as the Oodena Celebration Circle. It pays homage to the 6,000 years of Aboriginal peoples in the area. Oodena, Ojibew for “heart of the community”, features ethereal sculptures, a sundial, interpretive signage, a naked eye observatory and a ceremonial fire pit, making it a desirable venue for cultural celebrations or a place to simply sit and marvel at its beauty. Oodena was inspired by the myths and sacred places of the many people drawn to The Forks over its 7,000-year history. It is interpreted as an opportunity to restore contact with the cultural history of the site and the dynamic forces of earth, water and sky. Surrounding the bowl, cobblestone formations support sculptural sighting armatures that act as guideposts for celestial orientation.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Sun Stone – The sun was central to Aztec culture in Mexico. The sun god is in the center with the order of the cosmos weaving Aztec concepts of time, space, politics and the sacred.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
The vision of Antoine Predock, an architect from Albuquerque, New Mexico for the Canadian Museum of Human Rights is a journey beginning with a descent into the earth where visitors enter the building through the “roots” of the museum, through the Great Hall, then a series of vast spaces and ramps, before culminating in the Tower of Hope, a tall spire protruding from the top that provides visitors with views of downtown Winnipeg. Its purpose is to promote respect for others.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 7 – My Top 19 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 7

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
251 Furby Street – Mayor’s Mansion – two-story bay window
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
147 East Gate was built in 1882 for Arthur F. Eden, land commissioner for the Manitoba and Northern Railway and later a partner of Stobart Wholesale Merchants. Some people are of the opinion that this house was originally the home of James Armstrong, though others believe that Armstrong resided on the point only as a squatter. The front door faces the River as the original drive circled to that side of the house. The Bird Cage Tennis Club occupied seven acres here between East Gate and Middle Gate. In 1891, the house was purchased by William Fisher of Happyland Amusement Park. Mr. Fisher called this house Elmsley. The fireplace in the living room is faced with blue Minton tiles telling the story of the Knights of the Round Table and the sword Excalibur. The house was owned by the Dr. Bruce Chown family. Fisher divided his property into three lots and sold them. The southern portion, the red brick house, became the Tupper property. W. J. Tupper lived there until he became Lieutenant Governor.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
100 East Gate – Georgian – engaged columns, open pediment, sidelights and transom
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
90 East Gate – Gothic Revival with Tudor accents on gables, dormer, entrance with parapet above, sidelights – It was built in 1909 by R. T. Riley who lived here until he built 186 Westgate in 1920. The house then passed to C. S. Riley, his son. The walls are eighteen inches thick. One mantel has scenes from the Lord’s Prayer.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
89 East Gate –English Manor house – Jacobean gables, dormers with window hoods – built for George Crowe, a Winnipeg alderman in 1911. The home has ten fireplaces, nine bathrooms, a ballroom in the basement and a vault under the front entrance hall.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
69 East Gate – Tudor – built in 1896 by James Rawlinson Waghorn, the publisher of Waghorn’s Pocket Guide, a stockbroker and financial agent. He was secretary of the Birdcage Tennis Club (in Armstrong’s Point) and co-founder of the St. Charles Country Club. He called his home Maple Grove and it became a social center. The dining room seated fifty people in comfort. In 1905 the touring Shakespearean Company, the Ben Greet Players, performed “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” on the grassy knoll in the yard. Dame Sybil Thorndyke was a cast member, on her first tour. The second owner, Dan Bain, was a noted sportsman. Team Captain of the Winnipeg Victorias hockey team that twice won the Stanley Cup, he also placed second in the 1930 Canadian Figure Skating Championships in the waltz contest at the age of 56.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
51 East Gate – cobblestone, two-story frontispiece, hipped roof
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
40 East Gate – hipped roof with dormer and tall chimney
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
39 East Gate – Queen Anne style – three-story tower, dormers, voussoirs and keystones, gambrel roof at one end
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
5 East Gate – Greek Revival – two-story pillars, two-story verandas – built in 1906 by Thomas Ryan, of Ryan’s Boots and Shoes. He was the mayor of Winnipeg while in his thirties.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
6 Middle Gate – Henry Linnell, architect, designed this home which was constructed at a cost of $24,000 for John T. Speirs, President of Speirs Parnell Baking Company, now part of Weston’s
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
22 Middle Gate – three-story tower, dormer, second floor balcony with Doric pillars supporting it
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
64 Middle Gate – Neo-colonial – dormers, voussoirs and keystones, sidelights
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
123 Middle Gate – decorative gables, wraparound enclosed veranda – built in 1891 for Frederick William Stobart, wholesale dry goods merchant
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
137 West Gate – Greek Revival – two-story pillars with Ionic capitals, dormer with Doric pillars, dentil molding – built in 1904 by William Wallace Blair – Blair called it ‘Kenilworth’
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
134 West Gate – Queen Anne style – gables with fish scale patterning, tall chimneys, dormers, cornice brackets, second floor balcony with turned spindle balustrade, bay windows, pediment above porch – J. B. Monk, Manager of Bank of Ottawa, built it in 1898. It was Japanese Consulate until 1976.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
119 West Gate – Italianate – hipped roof with dormers and window hoods, tall chimney, balcony above Ionic pillars, bay window – owned at one time by Sidney T. Smith of Smith and Murphy, Grain Merchants
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
112 West Gate – Dunedin – built in 1906 by William Harvey, trust company executive. It was designed by J.H.G. Russell. It was owned in the 1950s by Rupert Whitehead, well known for his accomplishments as a figure skater with the Winnipeg Ice Club.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
54 West Gate – The Ralph Connor House, a three-story brick Jacobethan Revival mansion built in 1913-14, sits on a well-groomed lot overlooking the Assiniboine River. It is noted for its complex roof structure, and warm red-brown brick facades contrasted by limestone dressings on a high stone foundation. Designed by architect G.W. Northwood, the mansion was first associated with Charles William Gordon, a minister at St. Stephen’s Presbyterian Church, a social reformer and best-selling author of international renown. As ‘Ralph Connor’, he penned 25 popular novels known for their moralistic, action-oriented plots of good versus evil and for their portrayals of early life in Ontario and the West. The most popular works were incorporated into Manitoba school reading programs in the 1940s, and three were made into silent movies. Gordon maintained a Winnipeg ministry, served as a military chaplain during World War I, was moderator of the Presbyterian Church in Canada during the formation of the United Church of Canada in 1925, and was involved in the League of Nations. The house has retained a high degree of physical integrity due to its successor occupant, the University Women’s Club of Winnipeg, a pioneering organization that has long promoted the advancement of women in the community and has diligently conserved the Ralph Connor House since 1939. The asymmetrical structure has a complex roof featuring steeply pitched cross-gable and hipped sections, wall dormers and one smaller gable and two shed dormers. The large rectangular windows have decorative limestone surrounds, lintels and mullions, some featuring six-pane top lights; there are also three dominant bay windows and a large stacked bank on the south elevation with rows of four windows separated by limestone medallions. The exquisite details and materials include stacked chimneys, cedar shingles, limestone coping and accents throughout, bracketed eaves, and label moldings.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 6 – My Top 8 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 6

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
393 Wellington Crescent – The Fortune Residence, a 2½-storey dwelling of wood-frame construction clad in stone, stucco and mock half-timbering, was built in 1910-11 and occupies a large riverbank lot in the Crescentwood area of south Winnipeg. Designed by W.W. Blair, the Tudor Revival styled mansion was built for the family of pioneer real estate developer Mark Fortune. The house was only a few months old when Fortune and his son died in the Titanic shipwreck of 1912. His wife and daughters were rowed to safety and continued to live in the great riverbank home until about 1920. The expansive, irregular, slightly L-shaped house has various projecting elements such as bay and oriel windows, a stone terrace, an east-side sun room, and pronounced exterior stone chimneys. The steep, complex roof line of truncated hip and side-gable sections has twin overlapping front (south) gables, hipped dormers on all sides, and a gabled rear bay coupled with a massive stone chimney. The sturdy stone foundation and wood-frame construction are elegantly clothed by rusticated limestone and roughcast with ornamental half-timbering. The many windows are mostly flat-headed squares or tall vertical rectangles of various widths arranged in singles or groups, but also include a rear eyebrow window. The offset main entrance includes a grand stone staircase integrated with a tower-like two-story bay window. The door is set within smooth-cut stone. Other details include bracketed eaves, barge boards, and window surrounds of smooth-cut stone and plain wood.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
514 Wellington Crescent – hipped roof with dormers, and tall chimneys; second floor balcony above entrance; pediment above second floor central door and window grouping; second floor balconies on both sides of the house
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
550 Wellington Crescent – St. Mary’s Academy – since 1869 – corner stone A.D. 1902 – is an independent, Catholic school serving young women in grades seven through twelve.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
633 Wellington Crescent – Greek Revival style – two-story tall Doric pillars topped by a pediment
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
638 Wellington Crescent – Queen Anne style, cornice return on gables, dormer in center
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Wellington Crescent – Italianate – 2½-storey frontispiece with pediment, dormers in attic
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
61 Heaton Avenue – quoining, second floor balconette with composite pillars and balustrade, pediment with decorative cornice and year 1904
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
123 Main Street – Winnipeg Union Station was built 1908-11 for the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Canadian Northern Railways. Beaux Arts style with balanced plan and classical details of the grand central arch flanked by paired columns and topped by a large dome. Here a horse-drawn cart is seen passing in front of Union Station. Although largely abandoned as a primary means of transportation by the 1930s, some commercial businesses continued to use the horse and cart into the 1950s.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 5 – My Top 8 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 5

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
450 Broadway Avenue – The Manitoba Legislative Building, erected in 1913-20, is a monumental reinforced concrete, steel and stone structure on a formal landscaped site between Broadway and the Assiniboine River in downtown Winnipeg. The pinnacle of Beaux-Arts Classical architecture in the province is an imposing seat of government symbolic of local strength and vitality and of the import of the official functions that occur within its walls. The solid, massive edifice, which dominates its expansive site and is visible from various vantages, is a disciplined expression of classical Greek Revival styling crowned by a symbol of youth and enterprise, the Golden Boy, graced by allegorical and historical ornament, and proudly wrapped in local Tyndall limestone. Key elements that define the building’s stately Beaux-Arts Classical architecture include the symmetrical H-shaped massing, rising three stories from a high base, and sheathed in channeled and ashlar Tyndall stone. The strong horizontal lines are reinforced by the flat roof, continuous modillioned cornice, parapet and other banding elements, and the rhythmic arrangement of windows. The multi-tiered central tower has offset corners, fluted Corinthian columns, a full entablature, a copper-paneled dome with small round dormers, and a cupola crowned with the Golden Boy. There are porticoes on each facade, large stone staircases, and colonnades with giant order columns, full entablatures, pediments, and finely detailed entrances. There are many rectangular windows with some framed by architraves, others in relief surrounds. The exuberant and profuse details throughout include stone and metal balustrades, pilasters, engaged columns, belt courses, niches, raised panels, and urns. There are many exceptional historical and allegorical sculptures, including twin sphinxes flanking the north pediment, figures and groupings of figures.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
545 Broadway Avenue – three-story tower with cone-shaped roof, dormer, pediment, deep wraparound verandah
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
222 Broadway Avenue – The Fort Garry Hotel is one of a series of Chateau-style hotels built by Canadian railway companies in the early twentieth century to encourage tourists to travel their transcontinental routes. Popular with the traveling public for their elaborate decor and comfortable elegance, these hotels quickly became a national symbol of quality accommodation. The Fort Garry Hotel was built in Winnipeg in 1911-13. Its Chateau style is evident in its steeply pitched, truncated hip roof punctuated by multiple peaks, progressively smaller dormer windows, and finials; its imposing massing; its smooth-cut stone cladding; and its elaborate decorative stonework. Its main block is divided into three vertical sections defined by continuous bands of string coursing and entablatures. It has a two-story arcaded base containing the ground floor lobby and dining rooms; six intermediary stories with a regular, alternating, window pattern; and a two-story arcaded top containing the main reception rooms. It has strips of oriel windows flanking a slightly recessed center, delicately carved gables, Indiana limestone walls, a grey granite base; and copper roofing. The steep copper roof is defined by a multitude of small shed- and hip-roofed dormers, highly elaborate stone dormer facades at the corners, many pinnacles, and a large ornate chimney. Rich detailing is seen in the decorative stonework at the cornice, balcony balustrades atop the bay windows, and a rounded stone turret topped by a polygonal roof. It has a formal entrance with stone stairs, brass railings, and a copper-detailed canopy. There are grand, double-height interior public spaces on the ground and seventh floors. The ground floor consists of a main lobby; a main dining room; and a circular dining room at the rear. The elaborate main lobby is surrounded by a mezzanine with four large corner piers joined by arches with keystones bearing the national or provincial emblem; a marble inlay floor; marble stairway with iron and bronze balustrade; gold-trimmed piers and moldings; bronze railing around the mezzanine; paneled ceiling; and the front desk is concealed between two pilasters. The main, two-story dining room, occupies the length of the west side of the ground floor, and includes: large windows; marble dado; bronze sconces and chandeliers; a paneled ceiling with modeled bas-reliefs of dragons, thistles, pine cones and tulips; bronze, French doors with bronze handles ornamented with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) logo.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
433 Broadway Avenue – Land Titles Building – cartouches 19 and 04, composite capitals on the pilasters, pediment with decorative tympanum, dentil molding, parapet
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
433 Broadway Avenue – Entrance – transom, door voussoirs with keystone, scrolled pediment
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
391 Broadway Avenue – The Winnipeg Law Courts National Historic Site of Canada is located directly across from the Legislature Building in the provincial government precinct of downtown Winnipeg. It is a three-story, Beaux Arts style building of sculpted grey limestone. Its monumental scale and prominent siting attest to its important role and symbolize the judicial institution of Manitoba. Constructed during an extended period of great optimism in the province, the Law Courts building was designed by the Provincial Architect, Victor W. Horwood, to complement the new Legislative Building, a monumental Neo-classical structure under construction across the street. Beginning in 1912, construction of the steel-framed Law Courts took four years and was timed to open in conjunction with the new Legislative Building. The formal grandeur of the classically-inspired Beaux-Arts design reflects the dignity of the Law Courts. An elaborate corner cupola with a raised copper dome ties the pedimented pavilions on the south and east facades together, and draws the eye to the columned “grand entrance” on Kennedy Street. Across the facades run a dentilled cornice and a deep parapet, all in creamy-grey limestone. Interior court rooms feature large windows, with the higher courts accessed by interior passageways so that prisoners could be brought directly into the court from holding areas below, and to provide private entries for the judges.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
10 Kennedy Street – Government House – the official residence of the Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba – completed in 1883 – Manitoba’s Government house is a structure of solid masonry walls and timber floor framing. It is Second Empire architecture with a flat steep-side mansard roof with dormers. The royal bedroom on the second floor is reserved for use by the sovereign and other Royal Family members when they are in Winnipeg, and the gold room accommodates royal support staff or other royals if the monarch is occupying the royal bedroom. The attic floor has been divided into four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a sitting room, and a three and one-half room suite for the resident housekeeper. From this floor the tower can be accessed. The lieutenant governor’s standard is flown when he or she is in residence. Manitoba’s Government House is surrounded on three sides by manicured gardens. In 2010, part of the grounds was dedicated as the Queen Elizabeth II Gardens by the Queen on July 3 that year, in preparation for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012. At the same time, a statue of The Queen that had been created in 1970 by Leo Mol was moved here and unveiled by the Queen.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
26 Edmonton Avenue – cornice brackets, two-story wraparound verandas
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
37 Edmonton Avenue – Queen Anne style, turret, veranda with Doric pillars, pediment, two-story bay window

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 4 – My Top 12 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 4

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
210 Maryland Street – 3-story circular tower with cone-shaped cap, dormer
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
199 Maryland Street – Tudor half-timbering
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
745 Westminster Avenue –1910-1912 – featuring a beautiful rose window – Westminster United Church is a substantial stone edifice built as a Presbyterian facility in 1910-12, in the Late Gothic Revival style. It is of monumental proportions with a disciplined yet expressive exterior. From its imposing towers to its monochromatic limestone dressing and exquisite rose window, this church is a striking and vital presence in the tree-lined Wolseley neighborhood. Key elements that define the church’s style and stone construction include the substantial, expansive form of an elongated rectangle on a high base, with wide stubby transepts and a deep west annex, all built of stone around a metal and wood frame. The vertical emphasis is provided by the main volume’s two-story-plus mass under a high gable roof with cross gables. It has long slender windows, many buttresses and an elevated front entrance flanked by soaring towers of unequal height with tall belfry openings and crocketed pinnacles. The walls are of rough-cut Manitoba limestone randomly laid; there are smooth- and rough-cut door and window accents, staged buttresses with smooth offsets, and broad stone staircases. The distinctive Gothic-style openings, many set in Tudor arches, some with matching hood-molding, many with tracery, including the main volume’s five-part transept openings are other key elements. The large multi-hued rose window with curvilinear tracery is beautiful. Gothic details include crenelation, raised gable ends with smooth stone coping and banding elements, panels of blind pointed arches, and pinnacled colonnettes. The two-story annex has a hipped roof, dormers, south pavilion and porch, and generous fenestration. There are large chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
830 Wolseley Avenue – two-story turret erupting through roof
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
838 Wolseley Avenue, Moyse House, is a brick mansion erected in 1913. It is an example of a Georgian Revival mansion, an architectural style that was popular in the Wolseley neighborhood, an area of mostly single-family houses along the north side of the Assiniboine River, and south of Portage Avenue. Its orderly facades, hipped roof with dormers, red brick finish contrasted with light limestone and wood trim, classically detailed rear verandah and signature Palladian-style window all speak to the skill of the architect, P.M. Clemens, who also designed the house next door in a similar fashion. John Moyse was the owner of a downtown livery stable. Key elements that define its style include the nearly square plan, 2½ stories in height, its brick construction on a raised limestone foundation, a hipped roof, gable dormers, and a west gable end that doubles as a pavilion pediment. Other elements include the harmonious, symmetrical facades, with walls of mainly flat red brick. The many windows are mostly tall rectangular flat-headed openings in singles, twos or threes, with several having multi-paned upper sashes. The two primary entrances are a north door with sidelights and a fanlight accessed through a modified two-story wooden porch and an elaborate west entrance recessed below a broad brick and rusticated stone archway, and flanked by compact round-arched windows. The classically inspired details and features include modillioned wood cornices along the main roof, and south verandah, prominent keystones and arched brickwork over windows, stone windowsills, cartouches in the north dormer and west gable ends, the south-side walkout, and tall chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
960 Wolseley Avenue – In December 1913, when Mrs. Isaac Cockburn (Laura Secord’s granddaughter) formally opened the ten completed rooms, the school stood among empty market garden fields on the fertile banks of the Assiniboine River, at 960 Wolseley Avenue. The school occupies a large site in an older residential neighbourhood. When completed, Laura Secord School was the most modern building of its kind in the city. Twenty-six classrooms, two manual training rooms, a huge auditorium that seats 800, shops, showers and a third-floor caretaker suite made it one of the largest schools built during the era. It covered over 25,000 square feet per floor and was 72 feet tall. The school had separate entrances for boys and girls which continued to be used until the mid-1970s. The similar shading of materials on Laura Secord demonstrates how they age and discolor differently. All the limestone has a dirty appearance because it tends to accumulate pollutants faster than the brick. This is very evident on the foundation and windows sills and is common on many older buildings with limestone elements. While the stone darkens, the brick develops a patina, adding to its lightness. Laura Secord School’s most stunning feature is the baroque entrance way. Of fireproof construction, the school features long, classically ornamented rectangular facades organized around an interior courtyard. Inside are classrooms with large windows for natural light and ventilation, wide corridors, staircases and exits in all wings, and usable basement spaces. Key elements include its substantial, nearly square form, two stories high over a raised basement, of reinforced concrete construction with brick and limestone walls and a shallow mansard-shaped roof lined by semi-elliptical dormers. The impressive front has a central tower, an arched open porch accessed via broad twin staircases and end pavilions divided into three bays topped by stepped gables containing half-circle windows. The many tall rectangular windows, most with stained-glass transoms, are set in single, pairs and banks of four throughout. Fine brick- and stonework on all elevations includes a high rusticated stone base and pale brick walls laid; a wraparound stone belt course is above the second floor. Delicately carved stone column caps and keystones are found on the front porch. There are stone sills, coping and pilaster caps; brick pilasters, corbelling and spandrel detailing. There is an elaborate arrangement of brick and stone voussoirs atop the tower’s round-arched upper window. The stone-carved name ‘LAURA SECORD SCHOOL’ and a stained-glass version of the school’s crest on the tower are additional features.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
180 Nassau Street – turret and dormer
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
549 Gertrude Avenue at Nassau Street – Trinity Baptist Church – Romanesque style stone building, tower with finials with cone-shaped caps, rose windows, buttresses
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
525 Wardlaw Avenue at the corner of Nassau Street – Crescent Fort Rouge United Church – 1910 – a stately Romanesque Revival style church with banding on the towers
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
218 Roslyn Road – Corinthian capitals surrounding door with a semi-circular transom; circular windows on either side of door; balustrade on second floor windows, pilasters with Ionic capitals, decorative cornice, banding; two story tower at back
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
176 Roslyn Road – dormer with keystone above central window; banding above second floor windows; dentil molding
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
353 St. Mary’s Avenue – St. Mary’s Cathedral was originally designed in 1880 by C. Balston Kenway and was updated in 1896 by Samuel Hooper, an English-born stonemason and architect who was later appointed Provincial Architect of Manitoba. The building features elements of Romanesque Revival and Germanic tower and spire. It is the cathedral church of the archdiocese of Winnipeg, one of two Roman Catholic cathedrals in Winnipeg; the other one is St Boniface Basilica of the archdiocese of St. Boniface and is across the Red River in Winnipeg’s French Quarter.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 3 – My Top 9 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 3

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
254-258 Portage Avenue at Garry Street – The Bank of Nova Scotia – 1910 – The Bank of Nova Scotia is the only domed bank in the Prairie Provinces. Constructed in 1908-10, this was the first building designed as a bank to be erected away from “Bankers’ Row” on Main Street. The elegant facade is terracotta manufactured in England and hung on a frame of steel. There is exuberant detail. The sweep of the facade with its high dome and corner portal was an effective solution to the design difficulties of a narrow site. A 1930-31 addition matched perfectly the Baroque Revival detail and doubled the frontage on Portage Avenue. The building is a monument to the skill of its architects and the importance of banking to Winnipeg’s economy by the early 1900s.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
276 Portage Avenue – Completed in 1901, it was originally built for the Winnipeg’s Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA). As it was when it was created for the YMCA, the building included a rotunda, reading rooms, parlor, a 150-seat lecture hall, 600-seat auditorium, running track, gymnasium, recreation room, boys’ quarters, two meeting halls, classrooms, a library, boardroom and furnished bedrooms, showers, lockers and two bowling alleys. The building also featured Winnipeg’s first indoor pool. Birks, a company that designs, manufactures and retails jewelry, timepieces, silverware and gifts, acquired the building in September 1912. The building was changed to accommodate the jewelry store. Distinctive Renaissance Revival palace facades feature terracotta, granite, bronze and Tyndall stone. Above the third-floor openings are six terracotta medallions depicting the sources of the materials used by jewelers, with a seventh medallion on the north facade. The building retains many distinctive visual elements, including an overhanging decorative cornice, various window shapes, including rectangular on the main floor, arched on the second floor and small rectangular shapes in the attic story, all windows are outlined with distinct surround treatments. Decorative elements include quoins, niches, and an attic-level frieze. Terracotta color for the stucco areas contrasts with the cream-colored terracotta tiles.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
276 Portage Avenue detail – These medallions depict turquoise (representing semi-precious stones), an elephant (representing ivory), a Kimberley Negro searching for diamonds, a man diving for pearls, an oceanic wave delivering the riches of the sea (mother of pearl, coral and a tortoise shell), a precious metal-smelting gnome, and a silversmith surrounded by the tools of his trade. Above the medallions is a frieze depicting such characters and places as King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba, gates of Jerusalem, Hiram, king of Tyre, Negroes and an Indian, and the three wise men giving and receiving gifts. Alterations to the ground-floor show-window area in 1951 included a granite base and Tyndall stone facings surrounding the solid bronze show windows, as well as corner columns and vestibule walls lined with Travertine marble.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
515 Portage Avenue – The University of Winnipeg
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
287-291 Garry Street – 291 Garry Street – The North West Commercial Travelers’ Association Building a two-story brick and terracotta structure erected in 1908 and altered in 1914 and 1916 is a fine example of the use of heavily embellished terracotta and large windows to transform a small commercial structure into a stylish facility suited to upscale retail and service uses. The North West Commercial Travelers’ Association, a national organization formed in Winnipeg in 1882 to promote the interests of traveling salesmen, was an occupant of the site for almost half a century beginning in the mid-1940s. Key elements that define the building’s heritage character include its elongated rectangular shape, flat roof, and the symmetrical windows and central entrance of the main facade. The white terracotta ornamentation includes two fluted columns with plain bases and ornate capitals rising to a frieze with six lion heads and a parapet bearing urns and a prominent central shield with a cobalt blue crest. The front windows have decorative spandrels. Detailing includes delicate terracotta bands of intricately carved flowers, fruits and vegetables, terracotta scrolls, swags and shells.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
191 Lombard Avenue at Main Street(387 Main Street) – 1913 – Union Tower – Based on the Italian Renaissance style, the twelve-story skyscraper (tallest of Winnipeg’s early skyscrapers) uses pilasters which frame pairs of windows. The trapezoid-shaped lot gave the structure a frontage on Main of twenty-seven feet, extending one hundred- and one-feet down Lombard. The frame construction was clad in grey Kootenay marble on the lower two stories. The facade of the upper floors was clad in a light-colored terracotta. With the windows facing mainly south, the ground and mezzanine floors were lit by long, large windows. The upper windows form vertical bands between the piers to create a visual upward sweep. There is detailing around the windows in terracotta. The piers are plain but slightly beveled which makes the corner less obvious, and each terminates on a cartouche. The uppermost two stories feature paired arched windows superseded by a larger arch in a crowning burst of decoration. The Union Trust Company moved into its offices on the main floor of the building early in 1913. Trust companies act as trustees for estates and bondholders, handle transfers, and act as registrars and executors. Here large vaults filled with safety deposit boxes were located on the first and mezzanine floors. Trust companies encouraged savings and home ownership because patrons had their deposits channeled into long-term investments. Government and corporate bonds, as well as mortgages, were the principal domain of the trust companies. Financial institutions such as the Union Trust Company were partners in the development of the west through the granting of mortgages and bond issues that permitted cities and towns to finance improvements. Union Trust was one of many trust and loan companies operating in Winnipeg. It had its head office in Toronto and a second branch in London, England. The Winnipeg office handled all the western investments.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
191 Lombard Avenue detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
200 Cathedral Avenue – Université de St. Boniface – French University – With its magnificent Tyndall stone facade, the main building houses two gymnasiums, a fitness center, a library, a chapel, the Étienne Gaboury student center, the campus radio station, an amphitheater, computer facilities, a performance hall and an art gallery.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
219 Provencher Boulevard – St. Boniface City Hall, a three-story red brick structure built in 1905-06 when the predominantly French community of St. Boniface was an independent municipality, is an excellent example of a large civic structure designed to house expanding local government services at a time of rapid population and economic growth. The imposing, classically detailed, Georgian Revival-style building is centrally located on St. Boniface’s main business street. Key elements that define the building’s imposing exterior character and Georgian Revival style include the three-story rectangular block shape, symmetrically massed, with modest corner and central entrance pavilions, all of solid brick construction on a high limestone base, with a flat roof and parapet. The large square wood tower over the entrance pavilion, is organized into four classically ornamented stages beneath a domed metal-clad roof and tall flagpole, and features on all sides elliptical windows at the base and large circular analog clocks in columned and pedimented surrounds at the top. The large, mostly tall rectangular windows and transoms on the front (south), east and west facades are set in vertically aligned rows and flat-headed on all but the third floor where openings are round-arched with prominent keystones. The pedimented entrance pavilion has a two-story arched window, a stone architrave containing a double door flanked by paired Tuscan columns, a wide stone staircase with elaborate metal and glass lanterns crowning the pedestals, and side stairs that lead underneath to a basement entrance. There is a contrast of colors and textures, including red brick laid in a stretcher pattern with white mortar, rusticated and ashlar limestone and beige and brown paint. The cornices on the building and tower are prominent and modilioned; there are brick voussoirs, string courses and channeled brickwork; the tower has wood moldings, fluted columns and louvered openings beneath delicate scallop shells. There is a heavy stone lintel over the main entrance with the words ‘HOTEL-DE-VILLE’ and the date ‘A.D. 1906’ in the staircase pedestals.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
494 Taché Avenue – St. Boniface Museum – former convent of the Grey Nuns – oak log structure – Winnipeg’s oldest building – built for the nuns from 1846 to 1851 – Grey Nuns’ Convent National Historic Site of Canada is a gracious two-story hipped roof structure showing influences of Hudson’s Bay Company construction techniques in its squared log construction and European classicism in its symmetrical nine-bay facade composition with evenly spaced paired and shuttered casement windows. It has a central side-lit entry door, hip roof with dormers, belfry, and end chimneys. It faces the Red River and downtown Winnipeg and is an important element in the historic Roman Catholic ecclesiastical complex of St. Boniface. The building now serves as the St. Boniface Museum.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
450 Portage Avenue – Hudson’s Bay Company – It is a challenge to try to find a new use for the nearly empty six-story building at the corner of Portage Avenue and Memorial Boulevard. The key to redeveloping the building is in finding new tenants to fill the top four floors the Bay is no longer using.

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in Colour Photos Book 2 – My Top 11 Picks

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Book 2

The Exchange District is in downtown Winnipeg just north of Portage and Main. It derives its name from the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, the center of the grain exchange in Canada. The Exchange District is the historic center of commerce in Western Canada. The District developed from the banks of the Red River at the foot of Bannatyne and Dermot Avenues. Most commercial traffic came along the Red River from St. Paul, Minnesota where the nearest rail line passed. Goods were shipped to Winnipeg by steamer during high water in spring.

The Canadian Pacific Railway built its transcontinental line through Winnipeg which arrived in 1881. Thousands of settlers came west from Europe and Eastern Canada to farm the land. Winnipeg business developed quickly to meet the needs of the growing western population. The Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange was founded in 1887 and within a few years Winnipeg was one of the world’s fastest-growing grain centers. Winnipeg was also one of the largest rail centers in North America with twelve lines passing through the city by 1890 and there were over eighty wholesale businesses located in the District. Wholesale goods were shipped in from Lake Superior ports in the spring and grain was shipped out from Winnipeg to the Lakehead in the fall. The Exchange represented Canada throughout the world and it largely financed Winnipeg’s growth. Together with a strong world economy supported by an increase in gold reserves, the Exchange attracted many British and Eastern Canadian banks, trust, insurance and mortgage companies to the District to do business.

Through the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, the city was linked to other major financial centers of London, Liverpool, New York and Chicago. Most Canadian financial institutions established their Western Canadian headquarters in Winnipeg and by 1910 there were almost twenty banking halls and offices on Main Street between City Hall and Portage Avenue. Many Winnipeg-based financial companies were also established.

Some of the finest warehouses in North America based on an American Romanesque style can be found in Winnipeg. The Romanesque warehouses are typically of heavy wood post and beam construction with foundations of large rough-faced stone blocks set with deep, recessed joints (called rustication) and brick walls with piers and stone spandrels to support heavy loads. The Romanesque or round-head arch is used in the tunnels through the buildings which provided for protected loading and unloading of goods within, and in the large windows which provided natural light to the interior before electric light was affordable. At the turn of the century, Chicago was the center of North American architecture. Louis Sullivan developed the first steel frame and reinforced concrete buildings. Sullivan used stone and terracotta on the exterior, suspended by metal shelves bolted to the frame. He favored terracotta with simple details which complimented rather than completely covered the surface as in earlier heavily-detailed styles. John D. Atchison was the foremost Chicago School architect in the city.

Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
100 Arthur Street – The Gault Building is a six-story masonry warehouse with a flat roof erected in 1900 and expanded in 1903 in the Richardsonian Romanesque-style. Key elements that define the building’s style include the horizontal ordering of the three principal facades, expressed through distinctive materials and ornamentation, the symmetrical arrangement of multiple windows and banding elements such as the continuous rusticated stone sills on the second, fourth and fifth stories, the corbeled brick and stone cornice and the stone-capped parapet. The number, variety, size and treatment of windows, includes equally spaced rows of large flat-headed basement and ground-floor openings, repetitive vertical bays of second- and third-story windows topped by Roman-influenced arches, and bays of rectangular upper-story windows. The sash windows are in plain wooden surrounds, stone sills and lintels are rusticated; the interconnected hood-molding and corbeled brickwork are other features.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
70 Albert Street – The lively Victorian-era facades of the Telegram Building front the narrow-angled intersection of Albert Street and McDermot Avenue. The four-story brick structure, built in 1882, displays an Italianate style, which contrasts with the less ornate designs of adjacent buildings. Designed by Ottawa architect William Hodgson, the structure’s layered main facades are distinguished by their multiple arched windows, detailed brickwork and decorative entablature. The main facades are symmetrical with vertical and horizontal divisions created by pilasters and belt courses at all levels and the angled corner bay that connects the two elevations. The round-headed windows diminish in size and increase in numbers on upper levels and are finished by drip molding on the second and third floors. Details include slender pilasters with ornate capitals, voussoirs, richly detailed belt courses, ornate brickwork, and entablature.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
48 Albert Street – The four-story Royal Albert Arms Hotel is a brick, steel and concrete structure erected in 1913 and expanded at the front by a modern glassed-in café. It has a Spanish Colonial Revival-style front of brick and stone. The flat roof has a Spanish-style front overhang pierced by brick extensions of the corners and two interior bays and side and rear brick parapet walls. The main floor has ashlar stone cladding and arched window and door openings while the upper levels are finished in light brown brick and divided into five bays by the placement of linteled windows, two slight pavilions and a distinctive center section containing openings grouped in threes and wrought-iron balconies with large brackets on the third and fourth floors. The fine stone detailing, includes architraval-framed entrances with delicately carved ornamentation, a Manitoba coat of arms keystone and the name ‘ROYAL ALBERT’ in raised letters above the arched center window. Other materials and details are concrete lintels, sills and front string courses, the rusticated front fourth-floor brickwork, and the tall brick chimney.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
213 Notre Dame Avenue – – The Electric Railway Chambers is an eleven-story tall, elegant office tower constructed of steel, concrete and brick in 1912-13. It is an example of the Sullivanesque Chicago Style, a style characterized by its height, steel frame construction and abundant ornamentation. The terracotta-clad building was erected as the corporate head office of the Winnipeg Electric Railway Company, a regional force from 1892 until 1953 in providing power and streetcar service. Key elements that define the building’s style include the tripartite division of the primary facades into base, column and capital; there are piers and columns leading from the ground floor to the Venetian arches at the top of the building. The cornice projects and is elaborately decorated. There are large main-floor and smaller second-floor Chicago-style windows with heavy, elaborately decorated framing, while the upper-floor windows are paired and outlined with richly detailed surrounds. There is elaborate surface decoration throughout, including sculptural lions atop the piers, and twisted columns at the upper level. Thousands of white lights illuminate the engaged columns and arched sections at the top of the west and south facades.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
213 Notre Dame Avenue detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
228 Notre Dame Avenue – The Lindsay Building at the corner of Ellice Avenue, Notre Dame Avenue and Garry Street, constructed during a 14-month period between 1911 and 1912, was designed as an office building for entrepreneur Frank Lindsay. The building was located beside the Oxford Hotel, another property owned by Lindsay. Originally planned as a seven-story building, three additional stories were added to the plan after construction had begun. The building features reinforced concrete slab construction which was unusual at the time when steel framed buildings were common. The exterior of the building features a sheathing of cream-colored terracotta, cartouches, pilasters capped with Ionic capitals, as well as garlands of flowers around the semicircular second floor windows. The exterior is also ornamented with ten green wreaths bearing “1912” (the year of construction) as well as a pair of terracotta angel wings beneath each window, and five plaques identifying it as the Lindsay Building.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
228 Notre Dame Avenue detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
228 Notre Dame Avenue cartouches
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
120 King Street – The popular Kings Head Pub and Eatery is housed in a building erected in 1896 as a trading center for hides, wool and furs. In 1906 it became home to a German language press which published 20,000 copies of the paper Der Nordwestern weekly. After serving as offices for an airline and a radio and television wholesaler it became a restaurant in 1983.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
33 Princess Street at Notre Dame Avenue – Peck Building
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
72 Princess Street – The Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.) Hall, a three-story brick commercial building erected in 1883-84, anchors the southwest corner of the intersection at Princess Street and McDermot Avenue. It is a boxy brick structure in the Romanesque Revival style. The building has a flat roof and buff-colored brick walls. The elaborate wraparound entablature of pressed metal is adorned with brackets, crescent moons, clusters of seven stars, groups of miniature Corinthian columns, and the initials of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Manitoba Lodge No. 1 displayed in horizontal sequence from within square medallions. The vertical bays are separated by tall pilasters. The tall narrow rectangular windows are round-arched on the second level and Gothic-style on the third; they all have smooth-cut stone sills, radiating brick voussoirs and arched drip-molding. The main floor has a variety of window shapes and sizes. Other details include alternating panels of inset saw-tooth-patterned and raised brickwork, molded string courses, and belt courses of plain brick, and decorative capitals that extend the pilasters into the cornice.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
154 Princess Street – Findlay’s Stoves, Furnaces – The Hochman Building is the restored east facade of a modestly sized, three-story brick warehouse built in 1882 and now attached to a modern educational facility, Red River College campus. It is an Italianate-style commercial structure in the midst of a significant pre-1900 Winnipeg streetscape. Its richly detailed design by James Chisholm is visually related in scale, materials and style to its two flamboyant neighbors to the south, but with notable differences in fenestration, brickwork and ornamentation. Built for A. Harris, Son and Co. Ltd., one of the first Ontario farm machinery manufacturers to open a Winnipeg branch, the structure physically reflects the ebullience of its era and also recalls the early role played by agricultural interests in shaping the business district around City Hall. Key elements that define the facade’s animated Victorian-era Italianate design include the brick construction on a low exposed limestone foundation, and the three-story height topped by a flat roof behind a fanciful, oversized metal entablature and parapet.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
160 Princess Street – Exchange Building – The Exchange Building is the restored four-story east facade of a brick and stone office block erected in 1898 in the commercial district. It was built for the Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange. The structure’s grand design by Samuel Hooper is illustrative of the aesthetic transitions occurring in commercial architecture at the turn of the twentieth century. Its bold, eclectic exterior displays Classical and Romanesque influences. Key elements that define the facade’s imposing transitional design include its robust, symmetrical form, four stories high, with a flat roof and deep brick parapet. Its six bays are divided vertically by pilasters and horizontally into two distinct halves of rough-cut buff limestone below and vivid red brick with contrasting limestone coping, belt courses and lintels above. The Classical articulation of the center two bays are projected slightly in a pavilion beneath a large raised pediment, and include stone arch and oculi highlights over the fourth-floor windows, the words ‘EXCHANGE BUILDING’ is carved on stone panels, and there is a wrought-iron balcony and stone detailing. The many windows, some with transoms, and the large storefront openings are vertically aligned. The doorways are arranged asymmetrically with the main-floor arcade of stone arches, including the double-bay main entrances recessed at the north end and the single-bay entrance to the south. The walls are richly layered, and include terracotta patterning motifs, decorative moldings, string courses and other brickwork in the spandrels, entablature and parapet.
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
160 Princess Street detail
Architectural Photos, Winnipeg, Manitoba
242-248 Princess Street – The Bathgate Block, a three-story brick warehouse built in 1882-83, is a Romanesque Revival-style structure. It is located at the corner of Alexander Avenue and Princess Street. The key elements that define the style include the boxy rectangular mass of heavy mill construction with a raised rubble-stone foundation, brick walls finished in buff-colored brick, and a flat roof. The symmetrical organization of the three-bay front (east) and four-bay south facades, are defined vertically by stone and brick pilasters and tall windows, and horizontally by banding elements, including a metal main-floor cornice. The many round- and segmental-arched front and south openings include large main-floor doorways and display windows and elongated upper-level windows grouped in threes, defined by brick voussoirs and drip molding. The entablature and parapet are highlighted by courses of corbeled and diagonally laid brickwork and by round-arched panels with inset metal sunburst ornamentation centered over most bays. Details include the heavy rusticated stone sills of the front display windows, the smooth-cut upper stone sills, the channeled brickwork in main-floor pilasters, and the prominent pilaster capitals integrated with the main-floor cornice.