Queen Anne Architecture in Ontario – Top 30 Picks

Queen Anne Architecture in Ontario

Queen Anne, 1885-1900 – This style is distinguished by an irregular outline featuring a combination of an offset tower, broad gables, projecting two-story bays, verandahs, multi-sloped roofs, and tall, decorative chimneys. A mixture of brick and wood is common. Windows often have one large single-paned bottom sash and small panes in the upper sash.

Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Amherstburg Book 1 – 199 Dalhousie Street – Bondy House Bed and Breakfast – Century old Victorian Queen Anne home, turret called “Widow’s Walk” for a great view, trichromatic siding
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Brockville – 12 Victoria Avenue – tower, iron cresting; stone keystones and banding; verge board trim, finials; bay windows; veranda with Doric columns
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Grafton and Bolton Book – 6012 King Road, Nobleton – Hambly House – c. 1884 – It was originally built of logs but was rebuilt after a fire at the corner of Highway 27 and King Road.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara Falls Book 1 – 5982 Culp Street – Francis Sherriff and Thomas Bright started the Niagara Falls Wine Company (Brights Wines) in Toronto in 1874. They moved to Niagara Falls in 1890 to be closer to their major source of grapes. This house was built for Francis Sherriff in 1894 for a cost of $4000.00. It is in the Queen Anne Revival style with an asymmetrical form, deep porch, and an irregular roof line which includes gables, dormers and a turret. The house exterior is brick with decorative cedar shingles on the turret and in the gables. The three-part window in the front gable is an adaptation of the Palladian style; the central section has a round headed window. The large wraparound porch has Tuscan style columns that rest on a brick base topped with a square stone cap.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Tillsonburg – 38 Ridout Street West – Casa di Luca Restaurant – This two and a half story house was built in 1870 as the manse for the adjacent United Church. The front facade has gingerbread in the gable, small dentil trim under the eaves, and rough stone window surrounds; two-story turret with a cone-shaped roof.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Cambridge – Galt Book 1 – 22 Lansdowne Road North – verge board trim on gable, dichromatic brickwork, cornice brackets on bay window
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Eden Mills Book – Eramosa – turret
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Fort Erie Book – Ridgeway – 348 Ridge Road North
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Hamilton Book 5 – 252 James Street South – turret
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kemptville – 220-222 Prescott Street – de Pencier House – 1897- brick – tower, turret, iron cresting
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Kingston Book 1 – 95 King Street East – Hendry House – 1886 – high Victorian house in Queen Anne style – asymmetrical design, variety of roof heights and construction materials; terracotta (hard kiln-fired clay) panels; third floor sleeping porch, turret; dichromatic tile work
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Niagara on Lake Book 2 – 177 King Street – The Romance Collection Gallery featuring the exclusive works of Trisha Romance and Tanya Jean Peterson
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Oakville – 43 Dunn Street – towers, bay windows, balcony on second floor, cornice brackets – Cecil Marlatt’s estate
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Ottawa Book 2 – 252 Metcalfe Street – Queen Anne Revival – built by lumber baron John R. Booth 1906-1909 – elaborately shaped gables, ornate stone molding, intersecting ridges of the roof
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Penetanguishene – 83 Fox Street – 1885 – home of Charles Beck and Amelia Dalms who had nine children (6 boys, 3 girls) – fretwork, turret, dormer, second-floor balcony, string courses wrap around the house; unique shape of window in gable
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Petrolia – 411 Greenfield Street – Town of Petrolia Municipal Offices – rose windows
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Port Colborne Book 1 – 326 Catharine Street – The Harvie House built in 1900, it is a typical Queen Anne Revival style home and has a wraparound verandah with offset circular tower, two types of siding and a pyramidal roof. The house takes its name from the Harvie family who owned it from 1911 to 1951.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Sarnia Book 1 – 127 Christina Street South – Lawrence Family mansion – Mr. Lawrence was a lumberman – 1892
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Simcoe – 364 Colborne Street – old castle – four-story tower with iron cresting on top; iron cresting above ground floor bay window, elaborate cornice brackets
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Marys Book 1 – 163 Church Street South – turret, dentil molding, dichromatic tile work, wraparound verandah
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Thomas – 1 Wellington Street, St. Thomas – built 1878 (McLachlin House) – turrets, scroll work, bracketing, dormers
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Town of Lincoln Book – 5600 King Street West, Beamsville – The property was a Crown Grant of 52 acres to a loyalist from New Jersey named William W. Kitchen around 1790. He married Alice Beam and they had nine children. William and Alice’s youngest son, Jacob married Jane Dennis. Their only son, William Dennis Kitchen married Margaret Henry and built the house in 1885 on the bench of the escarpment, just west of the Thirty Mile Creek. The house was built with red bricks. The turret has square and rounded cedar shingles, topped with a finial. There are two tall corbeled chimneys, and a hipped roof with a flat belvedere. The gables have carved fretwork brackets and barge board. The tall bay windows are topped with segmental arches and decorative keystones. The front porch has an overhead balcony, and like the side porches, features turned posts, balustrades, spandrels and brackets. From 1999 to 2009, the house was owned and restored by Norman and Sherry Beal, who transformed the property into an estate winery. In 2009 Wendy Midgley and her husband Chef Ross Midgley purchased the Kitchen House and the Coach House from the Beals.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterdown – 289 Dundas Street
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Waterford – 3½ story tower
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Welland Book 1 – 24 Burgar Street – The Glasgow-Fortner House – 1859 – now Rinderlins Dining Rooms
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Whitby Book 1 – 404 Dunlop Street West – c. 1888-89 – Queen Anne Revival style – asymmetrical design – built for George Ross – Mrs. Ross was president of Whitby Women’s Institute and founder of the Victorian Order of Nurses in Ontario County.
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Windsor Book 2 – 694 Victoria Avenue – Queen Anne Revival style with Romanesque influence, 1890-95; cone-capped turret, cyclopean stone detail (stone construction marked by the use of large irregular blocks without mortar), ornamental terracotta inset
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Wingham – turret, fretwork, voussoirs, keystones
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
Woodstock Book 2 – 36 Wellington Street North – c. 1854 -Queen Anne – full two-story with attic, red brick, gable roof, two hip roofs with dormers, two-story bay window with gable roof, verge board with pendant posts and large brackets, porch and balcony have turned posts, spindles, lattice and bric-a-brac, string course is patterned brickwork, six-sided two-story tower with steep hip roof topped with finial, paired post support gable roof side porch
Queen Anne Architectural Photos, Ontario
St. Catharines Book 4 – 1 Montebello Place – varied roof line, turret, wraparound veranda on two levels, Palladian windows in gables, dormers

Victoria British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 20 Picks

Victoria British Columbia Book 3

Victoria’s most distinct neighborhood geographically is James Bay, a peninsula with Beacon Hill Park on the east, the Inner Harbour on the north, Outer Harbour on the west and Strait of Juan de Fuca on the south. Compared with other neighborhoods in Victoria, James Bay is relatively flat, but undulates gently. The soil is predominantly deep loam except for a few outcrops of bedrock on the shoreline. Its only prominent watercourse was Providence Pond (near the corner of Oswego Street and Superior Street), a swampy lake emptied by a stream that flowed into Major Bay (where Fisherman’s Wharf Park is now).

British Columbia stands at the edge of a continent. Facing the world’s largest ocean, it is a province in continual transformation. The landscape has a natural diversity. British Columbia has deserts, alpine meadows, and coastal rain forests. It is the most biologically diverse province in Canada. Change is the only constant in B.C.’s natural history: A rain forest where a glacier once stood, a grassland that used to be a jungle.

North Park is one of Victoria’s oldest residential neighborhoods, and maintains its historical character of a diverse mixed-use community, bounded by Bay, Blanshard, Cook, and Pandora Streets. This is Victoria’s second smallest neighborhood, after Harris Green, at one square kilometer or about eighteen blocks. It is primarily a residential community, grounded by businesses, recreational facilities, and religious landmarks.

Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1002 Wharf Street – 1874 – The Malahat Building/Old Victoria Custom House was designated a national historic site in 1987 because: it is closely associated with Victoria when the city was the preeminent commercial center on Canada’s Pacific Coast; and it is a rare surviving example of a 19th-century Second Empire style federal building. As the customs house for Victoria from 1875 to 1899, the Malahat Building served the city’s import and export trade during a time when Victoria was the busiest center on the West coast. Mining licenses for the Klondike gold rush were administered here. Key elements which relate to the heritage value of the Malahat Building include its simple, centralized, block plan on a high basement; its three-story elevation, with a roof-top viewing deck; its three-bay facade with central entry; its Second Empire style, evident in the mansard roof, classicized decorative treatment, and hooded dormers; its restrained detailing, including a bracketed wood cornice, stone corner quoins, string courses, and cut-stone window and door trim with keystones; its solid brick construction on a stone basement; its broad view of the harbor.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1107-1125 Wharf Street – The Rithet Building is a three-story brick commercial building located on the east side of Wharf Street, facing the Inner Harbour. Built in four stages between 1861 and 1889, the Rithet Building embodies the early evolution of the city, and illustrates how new technology supported the growth of Victoria from fur-trading post to thriving commercial center. Its most notable feature is the decorative cast iron columns at street level, and pedimented window hoods on the second story. The columns were made in San Francisco on the earliest portion of this building, and this reflects the burgeoning trade links with the United States along the west coast of North America. The caduceus symbol located above each cast iron column on the storefront is another notable feature.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
601 Toronto Street – William and Margaret Garnham built 601, 603 and 609 Toronto Street in 1891-92 as revenue property. This is a one-story, cross-gabled Queen Anne cottage with a hipped roof on the rear behind the two side-gabled box bays. There are sandwich brackets in the eaves around the house, under the flat roof of the angled bay under the front gable, and in the frieze of the front porch. The porch has a flat-topped, hipped roof and two chamfered, bracketed square posts. The round-arched barge boards in the gables, connected by gable posts with drop finials, have triangular appliqués with circular cut outs. The porch roof and the three gables have fish-scale shingles, the house is clad in drop siding.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
609 Toronto Street – Mansard House – built 1891 – This house is a modest example of the Second Empire-style, distinguished by its mansard roof. There are three round-arched dormers in the mansard, two on the front and one towards the rear on the right side of the house. The mansard is shingled with a contrasting-colored band of fish scale shingles. There is a small iron balustrade on the flat-topped, hip-roofed, box bay window on the front facade. The front porch to the left side was enclosed in the 1970s. The roof of the bay and the porch also have fish scale shingles. The house was raised in 1932 to accommodate the full garage below; instead of the garage, there is now a basement-level suite. The mansard roof is now unique in James Bay, and one of only about four such residences in Victoria. Margaret Priscilla (née Reed, b. Quebec City 1840-1918) and William Garnham (b. Suffolk, England 1830-1908) bought this piece of Beckley Farm in 1890. William and second wife, Margaret, came to BC in the mid-1890s, and farmed in the Colquitz area of Saanich.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
627-629 Toronto Street
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
613 Avalon Street – 1890 – Rose Thorp is a 1½-story Queen Anne Cottage with a widow’s walk on its steeply hipped roof. It has a fretwork panel in the pedimented gabled dormer on the front; there are shingled, gabled dormers on the other three sides. A cutaway angled bay on the left front is crowned by a pedimented gable. Fish scale and diamond shingles in the gable frame a Moorish-arched, 22-paned window with pilastered casings. A box bay on the left side has a shallow hipped roof sitting on the main roof. A bracketed frieze below the eaves surrounds the house. Queen Anne stained glass borders many upper panes of the double-hung windows; the lower sashes are single-paned, the upper sashes have horns. The shallow, bell-cast, hip-roofed Eastlake entry porch on the right front has turned posts, ornate carved arches, and an unusual balustrade. The house is clad in drop siding and has two corbelled brick chimneys.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
619 Avalon Street – 1891 – This is a two-story, hip-roofed, cubical Italianate house with a two-story angled bay window on the right front and a one-story entry porch on the left with chamfered square supports and a decked hipped roof. There is a more recent one-story square bay window with a hipped roof on the right side, and a small gabled wing at the rear. It has closed eaves with a frieze board on the sides and vertical and diagonal board panels in front, and elaborate carved brackets all around. Most windows are one-over-one sashes with horns. It is clad in drop siding. The quietly imposing home conveys the material success of Frederick Jackson, co-owner of a drugstore, and his stature in the community as a celebrated athlete in baseball and rowing.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
624 Avalon Street – 1904 – This Edwardian Vernacular Arts & Crafts house was designed by Samuel Maclure. It is a characteristic 1½ story, steeply-pitched front-gabled house with a symmetrical upper story over an asymmetrical main floor. The front gable is separated from the main floor by a denticulated belt course. The main floor consists of a cutaway angled bay to the right of a recessed entry porch. The porch has three square chamfered posts and a closed balustrade. The house has a gabled full-height wing on the right side with a cutaway angled bay on the main floor; on the left side is a through-the-roof wall dormer with offset windows. Most of the windows on the house are six-over-one double-hung sashes with horns. The gables are shingled and the main floor is clad in beveled siding. There are two corbelled brick chimneys. Maclure designed this house to have only one finial in the front gable.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
634 Avalon Street – 1890 – Old Park Cottage was originally a one-story, hip-roofed Queen Anne Cottage; a large hip-roofed dormer was added on the left side in the 1980s. The house has a hip-roofed, angled, cutaway bay on the right front, and an original angled bay under the new dormer on the left side. The front door with stained-glass lights and transom window is sheltered by a small gable on brackets with a round-headed arch; the gable sits on the hip-roofed porch. The frieze is unusual in being coved and having a decorative metal trim along its lower border around the house. The house has one-over-one, double-hung windows, is clad in drop siding, and has a corbelled brick chimney. This house was built by carpenter/joiner John Nichols.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
146 Clarence Street – 1883, 1896 – This two-story Italianate house has a low-pitched, multi-hipped roof which culminates in a square flat roof. Its wide eaves supported by sandwich brackets surround the house. The cornice and frieze are metal, as is the flared pent roof between the upper and lower angled bays on the front left wing of the house. Using metal instead of decorative wooden shingles on an 1880s Italianate is unusual. There is an angled bay towards the rear of the main floor on the left side. To the right of the front wing is a wide entry porch with bracketed, turned posts and a pilaster, under a shallow hipped roof. The right side of the porch formed the original extent of the house. The two-story 1896 addition to the right of the porch has wide, shallow, square bays on the main floor of the front and the right side of the house. There is a chunky, cantilevered second floor bay on the rear. The three main floor bays all have hipped roofs.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
132 South Turner Street – 1890 – This house is unique in a streetscape of largely intact turn-of-the-century homes running though James Bay, a peninsula on the southern edge of downtown Victoria. This one-and-a-half-story wood frame house is particularly notable for its ornate Queen Anne elements. The character-defining elements include: complex roof lines, with steep pitch and side-facing gables; steep front-facing gabled dormer containing balcony with turned supports matching verandah below; decorative verge-board ends with segmental arch, and gable top filled with curved extension of barge boards and half-timbering; Palladian window with rectangular central panel on front dormer balcony, with two sash windows; full-width front verandah wrapping around one side, with slim, turned supports; decorative brackets with triangular cut outs on porch columns, echoing applied blocks on top window and barge boards; large octagonal bay on south side, within verandah; tiny shed roof with fish-scale shingles over north window; corbelled brick chimneys with chamfered corners and stepped bases; drop siding, and decorative shingles; front garden and fence.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
570-572 Niagara Street – 1908 – This is a two-story, bell cast-hip-roofed Edwardian Arts & Crafts house with widely spaced modillions in the eaves. The symmetrical upper front facade has a shallow, bracketed box bay with four double-hung windows; the lower is asymmetrical with a hip-roofed, cantilevered, angled bay on the left and side-facing steps leading to an inset open porch on the right with three chamfered square posts. The solid stepped balustrade of the stairs and the porch balustrade are covered in double-beveled siding. There are shallow box bays above cantilevered angled bay windows on each side of the house. The windows are all six-over-one with two diamond panes in the center of each upper sash; the muntins are wooden. The claddings are shingle on the upper floor and basement, with double-beveled siding on the main floor. There are two corbelled brick chimneys. The house is now duplexed.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
649 Superior Street – Robert Porter House Bed and Breakfast – 1897 – This symmetrical, 1½-story, gable-on-hip-roofed house has bell cast, hip-roofed extensions on either side towards the rear. The gables have turned finials. On either side of the centrally-located open porch are wide, shallow box bays, each with a bell cast, hipped roof. The shallow-hip-roofed porch has three chamfered square posts on each corner which are connected by heavy brackets supporting wide, flat arches below the frieze. The front gable has half-timbering on cedar shingles, the body of the house and the porch balustrade are clad in drop siding, the stair balustrade has vertical V-joint Tongue and Groove.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
626 Blanshard Street – 1876 – The Church of Our Lord is a Carpenter Gothic style wooden church with a separate annex called the Cridge Memorial Hall, located on the corner of Humbolt and Blanshard Streets. It is the oldest church in Victoria. Designed by architect John Teague, its simplistic vertical lines, steep gable roof, and board-and-batten siding distinguish it from the elaborate masonry churches nearby. The wood form of the Carpenter Gothic style is an excellent example of the adaptation of the classic Gothic style to suit local building materials. The Carpenter Gothic style elements which act as distinguishing features include the board-and-batten siding, vertical buttress piers, bell tower, rose window, and steep gable roof.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1600-1602 Quadra Street – built 1913 – This symmetrical, three-story, Classical Revival brick and concrete block edifice is dominated by its portico which is comprised of a modillioned, denticulated pediment above four cast concrete Ionic columns. The whole structure is raised a full story off the ground, and accessed by concrete block side-facing staircases on either side of a balustraded terrace. Three upper-floor, round-arched windows in the portico sit over pedimented entrances on the terrace. Slightly recessed, heavy corner blocks on either side of the portico continue around both sides of the building. All the windows on the upper floor are matching round-arched windows.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1611 Quadra Street – 1912 – This brick and stone church is a fine example of the Gothic Revival. Its picturesque asymmetry, steep copper spire, and window surrounds are details reminiscent of British architects of the Victorian era. It has a steeply-pitched, cross-gabled roof with parapeted gables; paired buttresses topped with tiers of stepped stone lead up to the front parapeted gable which sits high off the roof line. A small, five-sided bay with a conical roof is centrally located on the main gable below its windows. The eye is drawn to the slim, octagonal spire by tiers of paired, stepped, brick and stone buttresses on the square bell tower. The tower has two rows of large dentils above the vents for the bells. There are a multitude of Perpendicular Gothic arched windows with stone, quoined casings around the building. The southwest entrance has a steeply gabled roof; the north and south aisles have deep, shallower-pitched, shed roofs.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
612 David Street – 1885, 1891 – This picturesque brick church sits on the prominent intersection of Gorge Rd and David St. The style is varied with both Gothic and Romanesque elements, reflecting the two stages of design and construction. The gable to the right of the square tower is the original 1885 building, with its date stone in the gable above three Gothic windows which echo the lower ones. The main roof on the later 1891 building has an octagonal lantern with a row of arched windows to light the interior. The square tower has a denticulated cornice and elaborate parapet with an obelisk at each corner. The main entrance on Gorge Road, with its triple arches in heavily rusticated sandstone, is Romanesque; a low curved tower with conical roof is located to the left and a higher square tower to the right. There are many arched windows, often in groups of three, some two stories high. The gables of the main facade have geometric decoration in the upper areas.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
Hatley Castle is on the grounds of Hatley Park and Royal Roads University in Victoria, Vancouver Island, British Columbia at 2005 Sooke Road. James Dunsmuir commissioned Samuel Maclure, a Victorian architect, to design the Hatley House “Castle”, and Messrs. Brett and Hall, landscape artists of Boston, Massachusetts, to plan the gardens and surroundings. Local stone, trimmed by Valdez and Saturna Island sandstone was used in the building’s construction. Its impressive exterior is matched only by the lavishness of the interior appointments; oak and rosewood paneled rooms, baronial fireplace, teak floors, and specially made lighting fixtures. The building is 200 feet long and 86 feet wide; the turret is 82 feet high. The wall surrounding the estate was also built of local stone and cost over $75,000; the Conservatory, costing a like amount, was at one time filled with white orchids imported from India; a large banana tree grew in the center under the dome. The rooms of the house were filled with flowers from the Conservatory throughout the year. Ten kilometers of road interlaced the estate, and a hundred men were employed in the gardens. There were a number of other buildings on the estate to provide for the needs of the large household, but many of these have now been demolished. The “Castle” was completed in 1908, and the Dunsmuir family took up residence in that year.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
St. Ann’s Academy is a testament to the dedication of the Sisters of St. Ann who were integral to the beginnings of education and healthcare in British Columbia. Built between 1871 and 1910, as a school and convent. Now a national historic site owned by the Ministry Citizens’ Services, St. Ann’s remains one of Victoria’s premier landmarks surrounded by heritage gardens and greenspace to provide an oasis in the center of the Capital city. Once Victoria’s first Roman Catholic Cathedral, it was built in 1858 and moved and added to the school in 1886. Like the many rural French-Canadian churches, it is modeled after, it has ornate altar and ceiling carvings, gold-leaf detailing, original oil paintings, stained glass windows and a 1913 Casavant pipe organ. The resplendent Novitiate garden at the side entrance to the Chapel has a geometric herb bed, perennials and a recreated 1925 summerhouse. The 1910 formal garden at the north-west corner of the property contains rare trees and the remains of a unique fountain. The Public Works Department of the BC government purchased the building from the Sisters of St. Ann in 1974. A portion of the building (the Interpretive Centre) was restored to a 1920’s appearance while the majority of the building was converted into modern office space. The Ministry of Advanced Education leases the office space while the Ministry of Technology, Innovation and Citizens’ Services operates the Interpretive Center, celebrating the history of this important landmark. The restored 1910 auditorium has also been restored and, along with 6 acres of grounds, is also available for public use.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
867 Humboldt Street – 1893 – Humboldt House is one of Victoria’s Historic Inns, has themed rooms — from “Edward’s Room”, to the “Gazebo Room”, and the “Oriental Room”. Antique furnishings, wood-burning fireplaces, framed jade art pieces, and wooden shutters set a very Victorian tone while the Jacuzzi tub, king sized bed and free Wi-Fi provide some modern elements.

Victoria British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 21 Picks

Victoria British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos

Victoria is the capital city of British Columbia, located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island off Canada’s Pacific coast.

The Carr House is where Emily Carr (1871-1945) was born and lived. She is a well-known author and one of Canada’s most famous painters. The house and its surrounding environment, and the impact they made in her life, are mentioned in all of Emily’s books.

The Empress Hotel, built 1924-1928, is a stone hotel prominently located at the head of the inner harbor in the city of Victoria.

Fort Victoria began as a fur trading post of the Hudson’s Bay Company and was the headquarters of HBC operations in the Columbia District, a large fur trading area now part of the province of British Columbia, Canada and the U.S. state of Washington.

The Parliament Buildings were built in two main stages, the first from 1893-98 and the second from 1911-16. The initial construction was a T-shaped building comprising the two arms of the facade and the legislative chamber in the stem to the rear. The later additions were an extension to the stem to house the Legislative Library, and two wings parallel to the stem. The style is an eclectic one that has been termed Late Victorian Free Style.

Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
207 Government Street – Emily Carr Home – This two-story Italianate Villa has a side-gabled roof with a central front-gabled projection creating a very formal balanced composition. The front full-length verandah is broken in the center by the entry above which, on the second floor, is a balustraded balcony. The balusters for both the verandah and balcony are pairs of fretwork “C” scrolls. The front windows are paired; the sashes of the upper windows are arched. The eaves have brackets and pendants. The gables have tall slender turned urn finials. There is a pair of twin-flue corbelled and paneled brick chimneys on the main ridge of the roof, and another at the rear. The right end of the house has a two-story angled bay, the left, a one-story angled bay with a balcony above. The entrance has a simple Classical sidelight and transom.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
721 Government Street – The Empress Hotel, built 1924-1928, is a stone hotel prominently located at the head of the inner harbor in the city of Victoria. Built for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), the Empress Hotel is one of a series of Chateau-style hotels built by Canadian railway companies in the early 20th century to encourage tourists to travel their transcontinental routes. Popular with the traveling public for their elaborate decor and comfortable elegance, these hotels quickly became national symbols of quality accommodation. The key elements of the hotel are its massive scale, stone and brick cladding, steeply pitched copper roofs, ornate gables and dormers, domed, polygon turrets, high-quality materials, and dramatic setting; its asymmetrical plan, with arcaded central loggia, and projecting pavilions accented by vertical strips of oriel windows; the presence of landscaped gardens around the hotel separate the building from the denser urban areas.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
One of Victoria’s most popular attractions is its historic Chinatown, once North America’s second-largest. In the late 1800s, Victoria’s Chinatown held the largest Chinese community in Canada. Many residents worked in BC’s gold fields and built the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1205 Government Street – This six-story building at 1205 Government Street and 612 View Street was built in 1912 by architect A. Arthur Cox for the Union Bank of Canada, which operated its main Victoria branch on the main floor and rented out office space on the upper floors.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
569 Johnson Street
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
581 Johnson Street – 1888 – The W.G. Cameron Building is a two-story brick commercial building located on the corner of an alley on the south side of the 500 block of Johnson Street. It is distinguishable by its decorative facade, intact cast-iron columns and wooden storefront, and a name plate bearing the name “W.G. Cameron” in its prominent cornice. The upper story has double-hung wooden-sash windows.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
571-577 Johnson Street – 1899 – It is a two story parged brick commercial building located on the south side of lower Johnson Street. Its segmented-arch upper-story windows are crowned by a corbelled cornice featuring a floral motif. Its upper-story fenestration pattern, with six two-over-two wood sash windows capped by inverted-U hoods, and its decorative cornice with floral medallions and decorative brickwork are character-defining elements.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
557-559 Johnson Street is a three-story Italianate brick commercial building. It was constructed in two stages in 1875 and 1886. It is a three-story Italianate brick commercial building situated on the south side of lower Johnson Street. It is the central building in a group of three structures which make up the Paper Box Arcade, a retail and residential complex in the Old Town district of downtown Victoria. Character-defining elements include the surviving original street-front facade with its upper-story fenestration, joinery, quoining, and decorative cornice; the composition of the storefront with two display windows flanking a recessed central doorway; and the pronounced stylistic differences between the second and third stories of the street front facade.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
550-554 Johnson Street – 1892 – The Strand Hotel is a three-story plus lower level, red-brick commercial building, distinguished by exuberant Victorian detailing and Romanesque Revival influences, and a projecting double-height central bay window. It is located mid-block on the north side of lower Johnson Street, within Market Square. Romanesque Revival influences include its round-headed windows united by rock-faced sandstone voussoirs; rock-faced sandstone lintels; and deeply-carved foliate sandstone capitals; additional exterior details include central double-height bay window clad in decorative sheet-metal with rectangular and round-headed windows; a broad, sheet-metal upper cornice incorporating a mansard roof profile; elaborate cast-iron roof cresting; red-brick roof line chimneys with corbelled caps; and round and square-sided cast-iron storefront columns stamped ‘Wilson Brothers, Victoria B.C.’ It is symmetrical with rectangular storefront openings; flat and round-headed openings on the front facade with double-hung 1-over-1 wooden sash windows.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
City Hall – 1890 – Second Empire architectural style
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1601 Douglas Street – 1912 – The Fairfield Block is a large, three story Commercial Style tan and cream-colored brick building prominently located on the northeast corner of Douglas and Cormorant Streets in the commercial core of downtown Victoria. This building is valued for its handsome Edwardian detailing, articulated by tan brickwork and cream-colored terracotta ornamentation, which reinforces the heritage character of the commercial streetscape of North Douglas Street. In partnership with nearby buildings of similar vintage such as the Hudson’s Bay Company Department Store (1914) and Hotel Douglas (1911), it is a good representation of the larger scale commercial buildings which transformed the City from a Victorian supply town to a modern Edwardian urban center. It has a prominent cornice, and grid-like fenestration pattern and paired double-hung wooden sash windows in the upper stories.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1450 Douglas Street – Hotel Douglas is a five-story Edwardian Commercial Style brick building located on the southwest corner of Pandora and Douglas Streets in the commercial core of Victoria. Hotel Douglas (1911) is valued as an early Victoria hotel, representing the seasonal population of the city in the early twentieth century. Historically, this hotel has played a significant economic role in the urban commercial area, providing both short and long-term lodging for people attracted by Victoria’s tourist attractions, as well as for workers enroute to logging camps or fisheries. It is significant that this hotel continues to operate at its original function. The building is an excellent example of a modest hotel built in the period of economic prosperity prior to the First World War. The architecture is a solid representation of the Commercial Style, which was used extensively in western Canada in this time period and contributed to the ideal of the modern imperial city. the brick cladding, terracotta decorative elements, the grid-like fenestration pattern, and the substantial cornice with dental molding are some of its character-defining elements.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
508 Douglas Street – South Park School – Built 1893-94 with an annex added in 1914 – This is a two-story, symmetrical, brick, stone and wood building. The main roof is side gabled with two prominent front-gabled wings at either end, each with wide, very shallow bays. The rear of each wing is also gabled. Heavy wooden barge boards and gable screens accent the front gables. Corners of the wings and the bays have stone quoining. The central roof line is broken by a Dutch-gabled, through-the-roof wall dormer which sits on the balustraded flat roof of the first-floor entrance porch. There are three front entrances: the main central entrance has a small wooden porch clad in drop siding under a pedimented gable; the two doors at the extreme ends are separated from the central porch by pairs of windows; the end doors and windows have quoins, and are all segmentally arched with keystones. The basement has large segmentally-arched openings and rusticated masonry around all four sides. The entrance on the left side of the building has an open wooden porch with square, shaped posts with brackets, and plain and fretwork balusters. Two massive corbelled and ribbed chimneys rise from the front of the main slate roof; all the roofs have terracotta cresting and finials.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
924 Douglas Street – completed in 1890 – St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church is a landmark red-brick structure, located at the corner of Douglas and Broughton Streets in downtown Victoria. The Church is notable for its prominent corner tower, which is situated at a bend in Broughton Street. The church displays a number of distinctive features, including crow-stepped gables, a variety of projections and towers, corner tourelles, and a picturesque roof line. Three sets of double entry doors are set in round-arched openings. At the rear there is a curved two-story projecting bay.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
924 Douglas Street – The style of St. Andrew’s is the Scottish response to the Jacobethan Revival in nineteenth-century England, and was a popular style for Scottish country houses. Drawing on the characteristics of fortified medieval tower houses and castles in Scotland, the style employs such elements as battlements, tourelles, and conical roofs as a declaration of national identity. Polychrome red and black banding demonstrates an awareness of contemporary architectural trends in England. There are stained glass windows on the side and rear walls, including the large rose window.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1314-1324 Broad Street – Duck’s Block is an excellent example of a large-scale Late Victorian commercial building. Constructed in 1892 for Simeon Duck, successful early local entrepreneur, MLA, and former Minister of Finance for British Columbia. This handsome Victorian building is a testament to the entrepreneurship of its original owner. Initially built as the home of Duck’s Carriage Works, and also used as retail outlets, entertainment venues, and early meeting rooms for the Knights of Pythias. This building is representative of the multi-functionality of Victoria’s commercial district in the late nineteenth century. Bold decoration and architectural solidity make Duck’s Block a dominant presence within Broad Street’s narrow streetscape. Bold Victorian detailing is seen in the arched windows on the uppermost story, the corbelled cornice detailing, and small triangular pediment above the cornice.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
The Maritime Museum of B.C. (MMBC) engages people with the maritime culture and history of the Pacific Northwest through rotating exhibits, educational and community-based programs, research services, and more. The Maritime Museum of British Columbia Society was registered in 1957 as a non-profit society. The Museum moved in 1963-64 to 28 Bastion Square in downtown Victoria. In 2015 the MMBC completed its relocation from its long-term home in Bastion Square to a Society Office in Nootka Court at 634 Humboldt St., with its collections being stored off-site in a climate-controlled facility. The Society Office houses exhibits that display artifacts from the collection, public research space, a gift shop, and staff offices.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
31 Bastion Square – The Board of Trade Building is a four-story office building located on the southern side of Bastion Square in the Old Town District. The building is a monument to the commitment of entrepreneurial order in the exuberant economy of late nineteenth century Victoria and British Columbia. Erected in 1892, it is a manifestation of the historic prominence and power of the British Columbia Board of Trade, which had administered local and provincial economic and commercial activities since its beginning as the Victoria Chamber of Commerce in 1863. The Board of Trade Building’s eclectic facade and imposing height contribute significantly to the heritage character of the Old Town District.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
31 Bastion Square – Designed by architect A. Maxwell Muir, the exterior decorative elements of this building illustrate the late nineteenth century tendency to portray grandeur and importance through the amalgamation of many styles of architecture such as High Victorian commercial design with decorative Romanesque elements, articulated by unique treatments of brick and stone work, and different fenestration patterns on each of the four stories; the symmetrical facade defined by bays and pilasters; the massive, rusticated sandstone base at the basement and first floor levels; the rounded archway entrance flanked by two Doric columns and stone carvings evocative of foliage; the unglazed terracotta used for decorative panels, low relief carving, and horizontal bands of floral ornament on the third floor and the fourth floor string course.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
501 Belleville Street – British Columbia Parliament or Legislative Buildings for the Colony of Vancouver Island were built in 1859 to the designs of German-born architect Herman Otto Tiedemann who created a series of five short brick and timber structures with low-pitched, bellcast roofs, reminiscent of Chinese pagodas, nicknamed the “Birdcages”. The Parliament Buildings were built in two main stages, the first from 1893-98 and the second from 1911-16. The initial construction was a T-shaped building comprising the two arms of the facade and the legislative chamber in the stem to the rear. The later additions were an extension to the stem to house the Legislative Library, and two wings parallel to the stem. The style is an eclectic one that has been termed Late Victorian Free Style. The facade is laid out in what is called a Palladian tripartite plan of a central block joined to two outlying buildings by colonnades, a Renaissance motif. Typical of much of the detail on the buildings is the prominent entrance with its concentric receding round arches supported on small ornamental columns. This is characteristic of Romanesque Revival style, derived from early medieval Norman architecture. A whimsical feature is the comic faces incorporated into the grotesques on many upper-story ornamental columns. The foundation and steps were of Nelson Island granite, the roof of Jarvis Inlet slate, and the exterior of Haddington Island andesite, rendered to a natural rock finish; local Douglas fir timber was used extensively. Marble finished the interior walls, stairways and floors of the Legislature.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
Victoria Centennial Fountain – activated August 2, 1962 – British Columbia was formed from four British colonies and territories: The Crown Colony of Vancouver Island 1849; The Dependency of the Queen Charlotte Islands 1852; the Crown Colony of British Columbia 1858; the Stickeen Territory 1862.

Victoria British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 18 Picks

Victoria British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos

Throughout the 1820s and 1830s, the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) was headquartered out of Fort Vancouver located on the north shore of the Columbia River. From there the HBC controlled nearly all trading operations in the region. The Fort’s influence reached from the Rocky Mountains to the Hawaiian Islands, from Alaska into Mexican-controlled California. At its pinnacle, Fort Vancouver managed over 34 outposts and 24 ports through 600 employees and six ships.

The American President (1845-1849) James K. Polk had his eye on the Oregon Territory and Mexican California. Polk encouraged large numbers of settlers to travel west over what became known as the Oregon Trail, then claimed the U.S. had a legitimate claim to the entire Columbia/Oregon district though was prepared to draw the border along the 49th parallel. The dispute was settled by the Treaty of Washington in 1846 which established the border between British North America and the United States along the 49th parallel from the Rocky Mountains to the sea, with Vancouver Island retained as British territory. The Treaty of Washington effectively destroyed the geographic logic of the HBC’s Columbia Department with Fort Vancouver as its headquarters. The Company subsequently moved its headquarters north to Fort Victoria in 1846, which had been founded three years earlier by James Douglas in anticipation of the treaty.

Fort Victoria measured 330 feet by 300 feet and had a single bastion in the southwestern corner near what is now Fort and Broughton. The fort was enlarged to accommodate more warehouses and a second bastion was built.

In 1849 the British government created the Colony of Vancouver Island. The HBC was given a 10-year contract to manage the colony, and James Douglas moved from Fort Vancouver to take charge of the operations.

Life at Fort Victoria was typical of most Hudson’s Bay Company posts. Men (mostly French Canadians) lived in large barracks. Local native people came to trade at the “Indian Store.” Furs from throughout British Columbia were collected and stored in large log warehouses. Small ships and canoes transported most of the furs and trade goods along the coast. Supplies and trade goods arrived once a year by ship around Cape Horn from England. Farms were established near the fort. Hunting, fishing and riding were the main pastimes of the men. Dances with fiddle music and occasional plays were some of the few entertainments.

Victoria is the capital city of British Columbia, located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island off Canada’s Pacific coast. Victoria is the southernmost major city in Western Canada, and is about 100 km (60 mi) from British Columbia’s largest city of Vancouver on the mainland. Named for Queen Victoria, the city is one of the oldest in the Pacific Northwest, with British settlement beginning in 1843. The city has retained a large number of its historic buildings, in particular its two most famous landmarks, Parliament Buildings (finished in 1897 and home of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia) and the Empress Hotel (opened in 1908). The city’s Chinatown is the second oldest in North America after San Francisco’s. The region’s Coast Salish First Nations peoples established communities in the area long before European settlement, which had large populations at the time of European exploration.

Known as “The Garden City”, Victoria is an attractive city and a popular tourism destination. Victoria is popular with boaters with its rugged shorelines and beaches. Victoria is also popular with retirees, who come to enjoy the temperate and usually snow-free climate of the area as well as the usually relaxed pace of the city.

Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1050 Joan Crescent, Craigdarroch Castle – . Porte-cochere entrance was the main entrance used by Joan Dunsmuir and her guests. The paneling and ceiling are believed to be western red cedar. The floor tiles come from the Minton tile company, England.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
The woodwork in the library is Spanish mahogany. The fireplace has the flue bent to go around the window located above the firebox. The portraits on either side of the fireplace are Joan and Robert Dunsmuir. Robert died in 1889 before the castle was completed. The cylindrical radiators on either side of the bay window are part of the house’s original heating system and were patented in 1874. The original stained glass in the bay window may have been chosen to depict the Dunsmuir’s Scottish and English heritage.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1069 Joan Crescent – 1913-1914 – This 2-story Craftsman California Bungalow style house has a low-pitched, front-gabled roof with open eaves and exposed rafter-ends, with two more front-facing gables and a gable on the left side, all with paired brackets and half-timbering in the peaks. There is a 2-story shed-roofed porch on the left front with paired, bracketed square supports at both levels, the lower ones on tapered granite piers; the top half of the porch has been walled and glassed in. Brick chimneys have a mixture of textures on each side, the left one with an alcoved fountain. The mix of rough “natural” materials such as random ashlar and shingle used to highlight the joinery of the porch and gable timber-work is typical of the style.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1070 Joan Crescent – 1913 – This hipped-roof Foursquare house has a 2-story, inset, full-width front verandah, the main floor now enclosed. It features an eclectic mix of two popular Edwardian styles, with Classical Revival modillioned enclosed eaves, paired Tuscan columns on the upper porch, and an entry door with oval glass and stained-glass sidelights. Craftsman features are the shingle siding, a bracketed and trussed gable and a massive granite wall and square supports on the lower porch, and a gabled front dormer with notched barge boards, brackets, and exposed rafter ends. Also, typically Craftsman are the three-square shingled bays with bracketed gables.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1401 Rockland Avenue – Government House is the office and official residence of the Lieutenant Governor and the ceremonial home of all British Columbians. The Honourable Janet Austin opens her doors all year to host celebrations, convene thought leaders and offer local residents and international guests with the opportunity to visit the beautiful gardens and attend tours. The house is located on the traditional territory of the Songhees and Esquimalt First Nations, in the heart of the Rockland neighborhood in Victoria, British Columbia. The Lieutenant Governor offers accommodation to distinguished visitors including members of the Royal Family, international royalty, heads of state and other honored guests of British Columbia. Since 1865, there have been three Government Houses on this site. The first official residence, known as Cary Castle, was built in 1859. Six years later it was purchased as the residence of the Governor of Vancouver Island.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1393 Rockland Avenue – 1912 – This British Arts & Crafts Tudor Revival house is Georgian Revival in its symmetry. Its main roof is flared and steeply hipped with a tiny, flared, hipped vent on the front. The front facade has two large, two-story, hip-roofed, box bays on either side of a large, elaborate, angled balcony over a deeply-recessed, centrally-located entry porch. The balcony balustrade repeats the pattern of the half-timbered belt which surrounds the house. The angled front porch is supported on octagonal posts with wide, shallow, curved brackets and solid shingled balustrades. The stair balustrades are also shingled. The two-story angled bay within the porch has windows with leaded art glass on both floors. The rear or garden facade also has two full-height, hip-roofed bays, but its faceted central balcony has been filled in. The shingled lower floor is separated by a belt course from the upper, which is half-timbered with smooth stucco. The windows are a mixture of leaded art glass and leaded multi-lights-over-one. The property retains its granite wall with large gate posts, wrought iron gates and railings. There are three tall, ribbed brick chimneys with heavy square brick caps; the one on the left is a through-the-cornice wall chimney.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1385 Rockland Avenue – 1911 – This two-story, slightly-flared-hip-roofed British Arts & Crafts house combines elements of both the Tudor and Georgian Revival styles. The modillions, the symmetrical upper facade, and the high belt course are Edwardian features. There is a one-story, hip-roofed box bay on the left side and at the rear, a shed-roofed projection. A large centrally-located, hip-roofed box bay on the front facade shelters the main entrance with its paneled door and double-leaded art glass sidelights. The square upper bay, with leaded art glass, is supported on substantial granite piers with heavy granite capitals. The stair balustrade is stepped and of granite, as is the foundation of the house. There is roughcast stucco and half-timbering above the belt course and on the upper bay, and shingles below. Windows are all multi-lights-over-one, and in groups. The tall, ribbed, brick chimneys are corbelled and have chimney pots.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1320 Rockland Avenue – Galt House at Gillespie Place – 1913-1914 – This stately mansion was designed by Samuel Maclure for Frederick Nation, a Manitoba department store owner and director of the Great West Life Assurance Company. Formerly called Highwood, it was re-named for a subsequent owner, John Galt, who commissioned Maclure to design alterations. It was divided into a 9-suite apartment in June 1943 by Miss E. Cherry.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1221 Rockland Avenue – 1911-14 – This imposing residence was built for Herbert Macklin, the assistant manager of Simon Leiser & Co. Ltd. It was converted to suites in the mid-20th century. At that time, the porch was closed in to provide more internal space. The original gates remain.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1171 Rockland Avenue – 1908 – Dundalk is a 2½-story Queen Anne house, with two gables on two sides of the building in an L-shape, a steeply pitched hip-roofed main block in the angle of the L, and a 3-storey polygonal tower on the outside corner of the main block.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1139 Burdett Avenue – Heritage Building – 1893 – The double front gables with huge perforated barge boards make this house one of Victoria’s best known and best loved Gothic Revival confections. The two steep, two-story bays are asymmetrical: the left one significantly more dramatic than its mate. Both units project slightly from the hip-roofed central core, with its Tudor arch and recessed porch. The ornate barge boards include flattened trefoils –a popular Gothic motif—and emphasize unique window treatments: Both upper window units have scalloped wooden appliqué elements, with applied shields. While the right-hand windows have decorative trim boards, the left-hand windows incorporate a narrow doorway onto a small balcony above a box bay.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
913 Burdett Avenue – 1904 – wood frame two-and-one-half-story English cottage style residence – Characteristics of the English cottage style include gambrel roof, double hung sash and casement latticed windows, corbelling under eaves, half-timbering, cedar shingles on lower level, hipped dormer, small gable extension over main entrance with squared wood posts and decorative brackets, box bay window, tall corbelled chimneys, and entry porch.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
923 Burdett Avenue – Mount St. Angela – This unique building plays a pivotal role in the Christ Church Cathedral precinct – even though only about one-third of the original plan was completed. Designed as a girls’ school in the Neo-Gothic ecclesiastical/collegiate tradition, it is arguably the best surviving building left by Victoria’s first significant architectural firm, Wright & Sanders. The 3-storey octagonal tower, originally intended to be secondary to a much taller bell-tower and steeple, anchors the front facade, leading the eye to the strong 2½-story front gable extension with its shaped parapet silhouette. The architects planned this extension, with steeply pitched roof and flared eaves as one of a pair. A shallow box bay in the center of this unit has stone columns leading up to a stone canopy that becomes the lintel for a two-light window with several decorative stone elements, including a central column with capital, springs, keystones, and trefoils.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
805 Linden Avenue – Heritage Building – 1910: The first resident was Charles Cross, a prominent real estate agent who served as president of the Real Estate Exchange, Board of Trade, and the Chamber of Commerce. This Edwardian Arts and Crafts residence has an attached conservatory to the south.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
1012 Linden Avenue – Heritage Building
651 Trutch Street – 1910 – Swiss Chalet style. Front-gabled with a fairly low-pitched roof, it has wide eaves and a highly-decorated central balcony. There are heavy brackets at the eaves, and the rafter tails are exposed. The upper front is jettied over the main floor at both corners, supported by large brackets, giving the impression of box bays. Groups of three slightly chamfered square porch posts at the corners are linked by curved hoods. The large, open front porch leads to a central glazed entrance door with art glass side-lights. The lower front windows are in two matched groups of three and all are multi-pane over single-pane. Each side of the roof has a large gabled dormer, also with brackets at the eaves.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
609 Trutch Street – 1911 – Edwardian Four-Square is 2-storey with hip-roofed, a pair of cantilevered box bays on the front facade. The entrance porch is on the left side with front facing-steps. The entrance is recessed and modern metal railings are used at both upper and lower levels of the plain open porch. The lower section is shingled and the upper has half-timbering under bell cast eaves. A central hip-roofed dormer is pierced by a red brick corbelled chimney. Windows are multi-panes over single-panes in groups of three in the box bays and pairs above. The faux balconies are at odds with the style.
Architectural Photos, Victoria, British Columbia
725 Vancouver Street – Heritage Building – built in 1892 – It one of six extant examples of eight adjacent houses built at the end of the nineteenth century for British investor Hedley Chapman. The B.C. Land and Investment Agency, who at one time owned or controlled half the real estate in Victoria, acted as agents and arranged for the construction of the houses by contractors Bishop and Sherborne. In 1908, the property was subdivided into six lots, two houses were moved further down Vancouver Street, and the remaining six houses were sold. This cluster clearly illustrates the early speculative rental market, a trend begun in Victoria’s early building boom. All the houses are identical in size and layout but have subtle differences in architectural embellishments. The Italianate styling reflects the architectural tastes of the late nineteenth century, and these examples are more modest expressions of the villas owned by more affluent owners. The occupations of early residents reflects the growth of the middle class. This building was rented by a succession of women who ran a school for young ladies. Characteristics of the Italianate style include deeply-overhanging eaves with ornamental brackets, wooden arcaded porch, double-story box bay windows, prominent front entrance with wood stairs, decorative barge boards, and bands of fish scale shingles. There is an eyebrow window in peak of gable.

Vancouver British Columbia Book 5 in Colour Photos – My Top 9 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 5 in Colour Photos

Lynn Canyon Park – In the late 1800s, Lynn Valley’s centuries old Douglas fir and western red cedar were milled into lumber for export to Eastern Canada, the United States and Europe. Many of these trees were over ninety meters high and eleven meters in circumference. In the park, you can see some of the stumps from these huge trees.

Moderate temperatures and an average annual rainfall exceeding 150 centimeters provide excellent growing conditions. The lush second growth forest is good evidence of the productivity of the area. The large trees which now cover the part are on average only seventy to ninety years old. The forest is mostly Douglas fir, western hemlock, and western red cedar. Along the creek where flooding occurs, sitka spruce, cottonwood, alder and dense shrub undergrowth are found.

Lynn Canyon Park officially opened as a municipal park in 1912. The McTavish brothers, whose company originally logged the area, donated five hectares of land fronting on Lynn Creek. The District of North Vancouver added another four hectares. The suspension bridge was also opened in 1912; it hangs twenty stories (about fifty meters) above Lynn Creek. In 1991, the District of North Vancouver added 241 hectares to the park. The Park has many hiking trails.

Lynn Canyon Park is a coastal temperate rain forest with canyons, pools and creeks. There is a variety of local flora and fauna including 100-year-old Douglas fir trees with younger western hemlock and western red cedar and many types of moss below them.

Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Lynn Valley Suspension Bridge

Lynn Valley Ecology Centre – Ecology is the study of living systems in relation to one another and their environment. The Lynn Valley Ecology Centre features displays showing the interrelationships between plants, animals and man.

The high sub-alpine and alpine communities have been developing since the last glacial ice melted. Starting with rock, the actions of water, wind, heat and cold can produce soil, but very slowly. The addition of plants speeds up the process, then animals move in and ultimately a living community clothes the rock. At high elevations and on the steep slopes, the soil-building agents may, at the same time, work against the accumulation of soil. Broken rocks tend to roll to the valley floors, singly or as avalanches, fine matter may blow away in the wind or be carried by moving glaciers and running water down to lower levels. Anything that tends to loosen accumulating soils promotes erosion.

Even when the plants and the soils are established, existence remains precarious. The growing season is usually sort, and even during that time the temperatures are often low and the weather capricious. Plants grow were slowly.

The animals that live in the alpine, from insects to the big mammals, are directly or indirectly dependent on the plants, while on the other hand, their activities influence the vegetation. All the living things interact together in a system which is called The Fragile Network. Damage one part of the community and the whole community will feel the effects.

Since man has extended his operations to alpine heights, the living community is now also faced with grazing cattle, trampling human feet, all-terrain vehicles, and activities which involve the devastation by bulldozers, such as mining, logging, ski developments and communication stations.

We were in the area at the right time to tour Purdy’s Chocolate Factory. Richard Carmen Purdy’s love of chocolate created the beginnings of a tradition that continues to this day. In 1907 Mr. Purdy opened a tiny shop in downtown Vancouver on Robson Street. His reputation for making superb chocolates grew quickly, earning him the admiration of chocolate lovers throughout the city. Purdy’s Chocolatiers use only high quality, fresh ingredients. Two large melters contain 30,000 pounds each, and two smaller ones contain 10,000 pounds each. The pipes on the ceiling distribute chocolate throughout the factory. On an average day, Purdy’s goes through 10,000 pounds of chocolate.  Purdy’s roasts an average of 3,000 pounds of nuts per week. Each day the dairy delivers fresh candy cream and butter. Candy centers are cooked over an open flame up to temperatures of 240o. After cooking, caramels, fudge and brittles are poured onto steel tables for cooling.  The steel tables have water chambers that can be cooled or heated depending on the recipe. In an eight-hour day Purdy’s can produce over 3,000 pounds of caramel. Purdy’s shell molding Chocolatiers produce Hedgehogs, Melties and Smoothies. 72,000 Belgium Milk Chocolate Hedgehogs can be produced in a day.  Cherries are put in the glazer to evenly coat them. At the end of the tour, we arrived at the gift shop to make some purchases. The next day we visited Charlies Chocolate Factory, a much smaller operation but with a larger display store.

Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Fresh Roasted Nuts – Purdy’s sources the best nuts from around the world, India and Australia for example. Purdy’s roasts an average of 3,000 pounds per week. During Christmas, they roast 3,000 pounds per day.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Small chocolate eggs wrapped by machine in multi-colored foil
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Port Moody Station Museum is owned and operated by the Port Moody Heritage Society and is part of their effort to promote increased awareness and knowledge of Port Moody’s heritage and history. Exhibitions at the museum include the historic Port Moody Station, community displays and the Venosta, a restored 1920s rail car. The Port Moody Station, built in 1905/1907, was the second railway station built in the area. In 1945, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) decided to move the station closer to town. Their employees lifted the station off its foundation, placed it directly onto greased railway tracks and used an engine to pull it to its second location at the foot of Queen St. The station was officially closed on September 25th, 1976, when the CPR discontinued their passenger service. The Port Moody Historical Society who were operating a museum on Kyle Street, bought the station. In 1978, it was moved to its present location on Murray Street and refurbished to be a museum facility. The Port Moody Station Museum was officially opened on July 1st, 1983. The Station, designed to be a live-in unit, has two floors and a basement. The main floor is currently accessible to the public. Some rooms have been restored to show the living and working conditions in the station between 1905 and 1920. Other rooms have been set up for community and temporary displays. Plans are underway to open the upper level to show one restored bedroom and provide additional room for temporary displays. The kitchen, with a coal and wood stove, copper water heater, and coal-oil lamps predates electricity and piped-in water. The museum’s telegraph office features an operational telegraph system, which is available for guests to try, and a hand-operated telephone from 1884 when the Port Moody and New Westminster Telephone Company was formed.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3250 Kingsway – Sir Guy Carleton Elementary School
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3154 Kingsway
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
118 Regina Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
119 Regina Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
731 Columbia Street

Vancouver British Columbia Book 4 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 4

In 1858 the mainland of British Columbia became a colony with its capital located at New Westminster. British Royal Engineers surveyed the area under the command of Colonel Richard Moody. As private secretary to Colonel R. C. Moody, the Colony’s land commissioner Robert Burnaby displayed talents as an explorer, legislator and speaker. In 1859, when Moody received word from local natives that a fresh water lake existed north of New Westminster, Burnaby immediately volunteered for the survey party. Moody later named his discover Burnaby Lake. Pioneer citizens in 1892, named the thriving municipality Burnaby.

Burnaby is located within a large territory on the coast of British Columbia that has been the traditional home of Coast Salish peoples for thousands of years. Burnaby had resources that were harvested by First Nations, such as cranberries and large game, such as elk. By the 1890s, logging was a major industry in Burnaby with many sawmills processing lumber. Timber for ship masts was delivered to Ireland in 1865.

In 1891, the Westminster and Vancouver Tramway built an electric railway line between the two cities, and what would become Burnaby lay between the two cities. Initially, land was less expensive in Burnaby, but prices skyrocketed during the first real estate boom (1909-1912). In response to the growth of the community, a local police force was established, schools were built, and the business district grew. Many housing developments attracted people who wanted to live in the country and commute to the cities of New Westminster and Vancouver on the interurban trams.

Although the residential areas of Vancouver and Burnaby seem to merge, Burnaby has its own personality. Simon Fraser University is situated on top of Burnaby Mountain – from here you can gaze north to the waters of Indian Arm, a mountain-rimmed inlet of the sea.

Burnaby Village Museum represents a typical interurban community in British Columbia’s Lower Mainland region during the period of 1890-1925. Burnaby’s first European settler, William Holmes, came to East Burnaby in 1860. In 1891, an interurban line was opened between New Westminster and Vancouver, passing through what is now Burnaby. The convenience of this system encouraged more people to take up land in this area, and in 1892 Burnaby was incorporated as a municipality with about 250 people. Burnaby was a heavily forested area, and as the giant trees were cleared away, farms were established. Many Burnaby farms grew fruit and kept chickens and cows. By the early 1920s, Burnaby had started to change from a rural to an urban community. In 1992, Burnaby celebrated its 100th anniversary, and in that year became a city with a population of over 160,000.

Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Burnaby Village Museum “Elworth” – The rural setting near picturesque Deer Lake drew Mr. Edwin Wettenhall Bateman and his wife Mary to this part of Burnaby. “Elworth” was built in 1922 as a country home for Mr. Bateman, an executive with the Canadian Pacific Railway. The house is on its original site. Mr. Bateman lived in this house with his second wife Mary, his daughter May, and his son Warren. Mrs. Bateman was an avid gardener. The house was named after the district in England where Mr. Bateman came from. The main floor of the house has been restored to its original appearance with a formal front room, an elegant dining room, and a cozy den where the family gathered to listen to the radio.
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Tom Irvine House – Tom Irvine and his friend Bob Moore built this small house in 1911 on Laurel Street in Burnaby; this was just west of Burnaby Lake near the tram line. Bob Moore died soon after but Tom lived in the house until 1958. Tom was a prospector in the Yukon. He helped build the Burnaby Lake tram line and railway trestles around B.C. Tom never married and died at the age of 100 in 1964.
Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Burnaby Centennial Park Carousel #119 was built in Leavenworth Kansas by C.W. Parker in 1912. It was operated in Texas from 1913-1915, was upgraded at the factory, and then it is thought to have operated in California. From 1936 to 1989, it operated at the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver. It was purchased, restored and donated to the City of Burnaby.
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Seaforth School opened in Burnaby in 1922 with twenty students. It was located on the north side of Burnaby Lake at Government and Piper.
Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
In our seats ready for class to start…
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
Jesse Love Farmhouse – Believed to be one of the oldest surviving buildings in Burnaby, it was constructed in East Burnaby in 1893. Jesse Love (1849-1928) and his wife Martha (1858-1920) moved to Burnaby with their family in 1893 to start a fruit ranch and market garden. The original house was constructed by local builder George Salt and consisted of an entrance hall, dining room, lean-to kitchen, master bedroom, and an open area upstairs with a shoulder-height divider in the center to separate boys and girls. The original kitchen was a lean-to attached to the dining room. It is believed that the house was expanded and a kitchen built between 1907 and 1910 with most of the carpentry work being done by the oldest son, George Love. George owned a sash and door company and built many houses. The detailed casing work around the doors and windows in the kitchens show off his talents. Love also built several large boats which were used for family outings and hunting at Pitt Lake.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
7026 Patterson Avenue
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
4251 Victory Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Greta Street
Architectural Photos, Burnaby, British Columbia
5668 Chaffey Avenue
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
6450 Deer Lake Avenue – Robert & Bessie Anderson House – 1912 – Arts and Crafts style
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
6664 Deer Lake Avenue – Frederick and Alice Hart estate “Avalon,” now in used as the Hart House Restaurant, was built by local real estate agent F.J. Hart in 1912. Born on the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland, Hart came to New Westminster in 1890. He purchased this site in 1904 as a summer retreat for his family. The home is designed in the Tudor Revival style and has a massive tower with mock battlements, corbeled chimneys, cobblestone foundations and decorative half-timbering. When the house was built, it was in a quiet, rural community where people lived around the lake surrounded by a dense forest. The narrow roads that snaked through the trees towards New Westminster and Vancouver were rough and long; life was centered around the home and the immediate neighborhood of Deer Lake. People hunted in the forest, fished and swam in the lake, and grew most of their provisions in their own gardens.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
5725 Buckingham Avenue

Vancouver British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 14 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos

Vancouver, the largest city in British Columbia and the third largest city in Canada, is a sea port in British Columbia’s southwest corner sitting at the foot of the Coast Mountain range. Much of Vancouver is built on a peninsula surrounded by water.

Expo 86 was the biggest event B.C. had ever seen in 1986. The World’s Fair drew twenty-two million visitors to the north side of False Creek over six months. The infrastructure contributions from Expo 86 include the SkyTrain Expo Line, Science World, BC Place Stadium, Canada Place and the Plaza of Nations.

North Vancouver is directly across the harbor from the downtown area. North Vancouver is a thriving deep sea port and richly scenic holiday area. Here you can ride a gondola car up Grouse Mountain, or drive nearly to the peak of Seymour, but offering spectacular viewing and skiing sites. You can hike forest trails and enjoy a thrilling walk across a suspension bridge in Capilano or Lynn Canyon Park. Park and Tilford Gardens is a beauty. Seaside fun is available at the beaches.

West Vancouver is also clustered along the base of the towering Rocky Mountains. At Lighthouse Park you can see some of the largest trees on the west coast of Canada. Horseshoe Bay is a famous salmon fishing center. Here is the terminal of the B.C. ferries.

Richmond is located on two major islands at the mouth of the Fraser and is connected with Vancouver by a network of highways and bridges. The flat, fertile delta lands yield rich crops of vegetables and berries. Richmond includes the fishing village of Steveston, the home of much of B.C.’s commercial fishing fleet in the early 1900s. Richmond is also the site of Vancouver’s international airport.

New Westminster is called the “Royal City” because Queen Victoria selected its name. New Westminster overlooks the Fraser River just east of Burnaby. Irving House is a Victorian residence with an adjoining museum. Adjacent to the City Hall is the Garden of Friendship, a beautiful Park dedicated to its sister city of Moriguchi, Japan.

On Westham Island, to the south of Vancouver, is the George C. Reifel Waterfowl Refuge. White Rock is a town on a beautiful beach and is named for a huge rock landmark on the sands of Semiamhoo Bay. My Great Uncle Dick Todd lived in White Rock and we visited them there.

The towering North Shore Mountains which form a backdrop to the bustling city of Vancouver have beckoned outdoor recreationists for many years. Until the opening of the Lions Gate Bridge in 1939, a fleet of ferries transported hikers and skiers across Burrard Inlet on the first leg of their journey to Hollyburn Ridge, which is now part of Cypress Provincial Park. The park was established on October 9, 1975 and is 3,012 hectares in size. Bounded on the west by Howe Sound, on the north and east by the ridgetops of Mount Strachan and Hollyburn Mountain and to the south by West Vancouver, Cypress sits like a ship’s crow’s nest high above Vancouver.

On a clear day to the southeast snow-clad Mount Baker in the Cascade Mountain chain can be seen. To the west and southwest lie the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island with Georgia Strait in the foreground. The diversity of natural features, old-growth trees and outdoor recreation opportunities both summer and winter, is due partly to the climate of coastal British Columbia. The average annual temperature of around 9-10 degrees Celsius (49-50° F) results in many warm days for hikers and sightseers. “Cypress Mountain,” was the official freestyle skiing & snowboard venue for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic winter games.

Harry and I drove north to Britannia Mines for a tour of a closed copper mine. We had lunch at Kahlina Restaurant opposite Shannon Falls on Highway 99, just south of Squamish, where The Royal Hudson is the last remaining steam locomotive in scheduled service in North America. Between May and September, the Royal Hudson steams along the breath-taking beauty of Howe Sound between North Vancouver and Squamish. Whistler is located 120 kilometers (75 miles) north of Vancouver. We enjoyed the scenic two-hour drive which winds around Howe Sound and close to the Coast Mountain range. Whistler, in the heart of the mountains, is very scenic.

On the return trip, we stopped at Brandywine Falls with a 211-foot drop, with 600 cubic feet of water per minute falling over the falls at the heaviest season in early summer.  It got its name from the time when brandy and wine were bartered for guessing the height of the falls.

Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Lions Gate Bridge was named after two mountain peaks that look like sleeping lions.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
428 Fourth Street
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#320 – The Oscar Latham House, built 1909
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#407 – Dr. James Hatherly, Thomas H. Hatherly – built 1906
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#313 – Joseph J. Mahoney, built 1910
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
#331 – The J. E. Brown House, built 1910
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Irving House is the oldest surviving intact house in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. It was built from 1862-1864 by Royal Engineers; it was built of California redwood in the San Francisco Gothic Revival style. At the time the house cost $10,000 to build which was the equivalent of a year’s salary for a very rich man. and was occupied until 1950 by the Irving Family.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Castle Coevorden is a replica of the Coevorden Castle in the Netherlands — the ancestral home of explorer Captain George Vancouver.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Guan Yin Buddhist Temple is the most authentic structure of traditional Chinese palatial (imperial) style in North America. Its design is based on the Forbidden City in Beijing, China. It features golden tiles on its two-tiered roof, flared eaves, and two scholar’s courtyards.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Snow Geese are snowy white with black wing tips.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
At Cypress Provincial Park we walked the trails to Point Atkinson Lighthouse. The added treat was to view a Pileated Woodpecker pecking away at a tree. Point Atkinson Lighthouse was built in 1912 with a hexagonal tower 18.3 meters high. This light is on the outer approach to Burrard Inlet. The flashing light and mournful fog horn are a colorful part of the history of West Vancouver.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
We had a ride to North Vancouver on the Sea Bus, a twin-hulled catamaran operated by Metro Transit as part of the city’s public bus system. SeaBus runs eighty trips per day. carrying thousands of commuters to City Centre across Burrard Inlet from downtown North Vancouver. We left from the old C.P.R. railway station, built in 1914, which now serves as a Sea Bus terminal at the foot of Granville Street, and arrived on the north shore. The trip takes fifteen minutes, including turn-around time. It was established in June 1977.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
SkyTrain was constructed in 1987 making it convenient to travel from North Vancouver (via SeaBus) through downtown Vancouver to Surrey stopping at four stations in Burnaby.
Architectural Photos, Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
West Cordova Street – Canadian Pacific Railway Station – Neo-Classical building built between 1912 and 1914 (third building on this site) – Behind the colonnade of Ionic columns is an impressive lobby with panels depicting landscapes seen from trains as they traveled across the country.

Vancouver British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos – My Top 17 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 2 in Colour Photos

Vancouver is the largest city in British Columbia. It is a sea port in British Columbia’s southwest corner sitting at the foot of the Coast Mountain range. Much of Vancouver is built on a peninsula surrounded by water.

Vancouver is a city with a view. It has a natural harbor, a backdrop of rugged mountain peaks, a forest-like park, sandy beaches, you can ride a gondola car up Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver, and you can fish for salmon. You can drive almost to the peak of Mount Seymour for beautiful views and skiing sites. Vancouver is Canada’s third largest city.

Robson Square is located in the heart of downtown Vancouver; it was designed by Arthur Erickson and houses a Law Courts building, office space for six hundred government employees, and the City’s outdoor ice-skating rink. The three-block development has a rooftop reflecting pool, three waterfalls, a foot bridge, a man-made mountain, and many trees and shrubs.

We drove up Mount Seymour to the bottom of the ski slopes (the end of the roadway) where the elevation is 1,016 miles.

Canada Place resembles an enormous ocean liner with its roof of billowing sails. Canada Place represents many stories, such as, Indian legends, shipwrecks, cruise ships, Vancouver’s history and beautiful scenery, freight and cargo, exports and imports, Vancouver and Canada’s development in world trade. Canada Place is the terminal where cruise ships dock. It was built for Expo 1986 and is a dramatic structure with its distinctive sails. Underneath is the Vancouver Trade and Convention Centre.

Granville Island incorporates everything from the theaters to a popular public market. Located at the south side of False Creek under the Granville Street Bridge, Vancouver’s Granville Island Public Market sells fresh vegetables, fresh fish, meats and other groceries and plants. The Island is home to several restaurants as well as a marina. Access from downtown is via the Granville Street Bridge.

Queen Elizabeth Park was once a quarry. From its location on Little Mountain, there is a fine view of the city, mountains and sea. Rolling lawns and gardens are interspersed with winding paths to enable enjoyment of colorful flower beds. The dome of the Bloedel Floral Conservatory is a beacon to lure park visitors to view an assortment of tropical and semi-tropical plants.

Stanley Park at the western end of the city is a thousand-acre wilderness crisscrossed by walking trails and bounded by an eleven-kilometer seawall. Indian carvings on the totem poles tell their enchanting tales with each figure, animal and head depicting some phase of life or belief of the early coast Indians.

Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
837-857 Hamilton Street – Hamilton Street Victorian Homes – These four homes date from when Vancouver was less than a decade old and new homes such as these filled the neighborhood all the way to Granville and Hastings Streets. Each was built in the Queen Anne style, three in 1893, with the newer 1895 Alex Gibson house displaying fine mill work in its gables.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
509 Richards Street – The eight-story Lumbermen’s Building, originally known as the North West Trust Company Building, is a reinforced-concrete commercial structure with terracotta ornament, built in 1911-12 and located on Richards Street south of West Pender Street in downtown Vancouver. It is a good example of the Edwardian Commercial Style, which was the decorated version of the Commercial Style, in which the elevation is treated in three parts – a base and a cap, both of which are finished in ornamental terracotta; and a five-story, relatively plain brick-faced ‘shaft’ between them. The decorated facade contrasts with the plain, brick treatment of the other three elevations. The character-defining elements of the building include: the simple, point-tower massing built flush to the sidewalk and lane; the classical terracotta ornament on the ground floor, including the Doric columns and pilasters supporting a frieze and cornice; the column bases, the arched surrounds on the outer bays; the recessed panels between the mezzanine windows, and the narrow frieze above the mezzanine floor; the terracotta ornament of the top floor, including the segmental-headed windows, decorative frieze, strong cornice, and dentils and brackets below the window sills; the uninterrupted brick piers and recessed spandrels of the intermediate floors; the terracotta capping to the parapet on the south elevation; the terracotta window sills on all the elevations; the plain brick walls on the side and rear elevations.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
1120 Mole Hill – Mole Hill is a heritage housing community in the heart of the West End. It sits in the block framed by Thurlow, Pendrell, Bute, and Comox Streets, two blocks north of Davie Street and one block west of Burrard. This 170 unit unique and complex project involved the restoration of 26 City of Vancouver-owned heritage houses on an entire city block in the heart of Vancouver’s densely populated West End. The homes include some of the oldest structures remaining from early Vancouver history. This significant heritage resource had been under threat of demolition for many years. The heritage interiors and exteriors of the houses were preserved; each of the houses was raised, adding proper foundations and an additional story; the houses were adapted to include energy efficient heating systems, storm water management and re-use of heritage features. Mole Hill now houses low-income singles and families, as well as market tenants, in studio, one, two- and three-bedroom units. Along with the century-old houses, the project also preserved many of the site’s mature trees. The public space of the Mole Hill block was reconfigured to include community gardens, pathways, benches and a water feature. The introduction of traffic-calming features in the lane way protects the safety of residents and introduced a pleasant walkway for the entire community. Awards for Mole Hill include the 2004 Heritage Canada Award, the 2004 City of Vancouver Heritage Award of Honour, the Canadian Construction Association’s 2004 Environmental Achievement Award and a 2006 CMHC Housing Award for Best Practices in Affordable Housing.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
750 Hornby Street – Vancouver Art Gallery – It was the former Vancouver Court House.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
5668 Chaffey Avenue – our lodging during our stays – with brother and sister-in-law
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Pink dogwood
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada Place is located at the south foot of Burrard Street opposite the Waterfront Centre Hotel and adjacent to the Pan Pacific Hotel. The Waterfront Sky Train Station is close by.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Burrard Street Bridge
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Queen Elizabeth Park is located at the city’s highest point providing a panoramic view of Greater Vancouver and North Shore Mountains. It is the city’s first Civic Arboretum.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Fountain at Queen Elizabeth Park
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Stanley Park Totem Poles
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
‘Girl in Wetsuit’ represents Vancouver’s dependence on the sea
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
Replica of the figurehead of the S.S. Empress of Japan which plied these waters for thirty-one years 1891-1922 carrying Vancouver’s commerce to the Orient.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The H.R. MacMillan Planetarium is designed in the shape of the cedar hats worn by the Coast Salish people.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The St. Roch, a short, two-mast schooner, was a Royal Canadian Mounted Police ship with eleven crew. It was the first vessel to travel from the Pacific to the Atlantic through the fabled Northwest Passage, and the two perilous voyages made by the little wooden ship maintained Canadian sovereignty over the Arctic islands. It was built as an Arctic supply and patrol ship the R.C.M.P. bases up to Coppermine. It was in service for twenty-six years. There is only a four-month time period when the ice was open (not frozen).
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Museum of Anthropology, located on the cliffs of Point Grey, with a display of Northwest Coast First Nations art is housed in the award-winning glass and concrete structure designed by architect Arthur Erickson which was inspired by the traditional post and beam architecture of North West Coast First Nations People. Pottery, dolls, carvings, wooden musical instruments, lead glazed earthenware tiled stove and Chinese ceramic dishes were on display.
Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The Spirit of Haida Gwaii: The Jade Canoe – 1994 – Artist: Bill Reid – Dimensions and materials: Bronze cast with a jade green patina – at Vancouver International Airport – Often described as the Heart of the Airport, this acclaimed sculpture was inspired by nineteenth-century miniature canoes carved in argillite, a soft sedimentary rock that is found near Skidegate on Haida Gwaii. As with many historic examples of miniature canoes, this vessel is crowded with creatures and beings, their identities drawn from legends and oral histories of the Haida, and their forms energetically and sometimes fiercely interacting with each other in the manner of rivalrous siblings.

Vancouver British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos – My Top 13 Picks

Vancouver British Columbia Book 1 in Colour Photos

Vancouver, the largest city in British Columbia and the third largest city in Canada, is a sea port in British Columbia’s southwest corner sitting at the foot of the Coast Mountain range. Much of Vancouver is built on a peninsula surrounded by water.

Downtown Vancouver sprawls out from Granville and Georgia Streets. North America’s second largest Chinatown stretches along Main Street and three blocks of Pender between Gore and Carrall Streets.

The central peninsula is the commercial heart of the city where office towers, shopping centers, condos and hotels view for views. At its northern reach, the stylized sails on the roof of Canada Place just into the harbor. West Georgia is the main artery through city center. Howe Street north of Georgia is the city’s financial heart, home to the Vancouver Stock Exchange. South of Georgia, between Hornby and Howe, the Vancouver Art Gallery fronts Robson Square and Arthur Erickson’s glass-enclosed Law Courts. Granville around Robson is a pedestrian mall with fashionable stores, movie theaters, clubs and concert halls. The eastern end of Georgia Street, near the coliseum-shaped Vancouver Public Library, is the theater and stadium district.

Gastown is the historic core of Vancouver, and is the city’s earliest, most historic area of commercial buildings and warehouses. The Gastown historic district retains a consistent and distinctive building form that is a manifestation of successive economic waves that followed the devastation of the Great Fire in 1886, the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1887, the Klondike Gold Rush and the western Canadian boom that occurred prior to the First World War. The Byrnes Block embodies the sudden influx in investment capital that flowed into Gastown based on the certainty of growth promised by the arrival of the transcontinental railway. This building, and the Ferguson Block located across the street, are among the oldest extant buildings in Vancouver that are still standing at their original location; only the relocated Hastings Mill Museum building is known to predate them.

The Byrnes Block is the site of the Alhambra Hotel, located on the upper floor, a representation of the area’s seasonal population in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hotels provided both short and long-term lodging, serving primarily those who worked in the seasonal resource trades such as fishing and logging. Many of these hotels had combined functions of commercial services on the ground floor and lodging rooms on the upper floors, which contributed to the lively street life in Gastown. The Alhambra Hotel was opulent in its time, contrasted with the numerous cheap wooden hotels built in the area before and after the 1886 fire. As the city grew and building materials became more readily available after the arrival of the railway, it was quickly expanded in a series of additions until it reached its present form.

Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
1690 Matthews Avenue – This stately mansion was built in 1910 for William Lamont Tait, a Scottish-born businessman involved in lumber and real estate after his arrival in BC. This Queen Anne mansion with its grand entrance, round turrets, stained-glass windows, and large brackets uses various materials. The building was converted in 1994 to Canuck Place, BC’s pediatric palliative care provider for children with life-threatening illnesses and the families who love them. The goal of this specialized care is to enhance the comfort and quality of life for both the child and their family. It is achieved through the combination of active and compassionate therapies. Palliative care strives to support children and families by assisting them in fulfilling their physical, psychological, social and spiritual goals while remaining sensitive to personal, cultural and religious values, beliefs and practices.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3637 Hudson Street – Tudor style
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3470 Osler Street – dormers
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3688 Osler Street – dormers, recessed entrance way
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3733 Osler Street – Tudor style, round room
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3690 Selkirk Street – two-story pillars with balcony above, bay window
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
3689 Selkirk Street – A.E. Tulk House Rosemary – This 1915 Tudor Revival English Manor was built for lawyer and whiskey baron Edward Tulk who named it after his only daughter Rosemary. From 1947 to 1994, the house was owned by The Order of the Convent of Our Lady of the Cenacle who operated it as a retreat.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
36 West Cordova Street – Lonsdale Building – built 1889
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
207 West Hastings Street at Cambie Street – Dominion Building – When it opened in 1910 it was the tallest building in the British Empire; it was Vancouver’s first steel-framed high-rise at 53 meters (175 feet). It was built to house the Dominion Trust which later became the Dominion Bank.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
The famous Gastown clock on Water Street, designed and built by R. L. Saunders, is the world’s first steam power clock. This clock is located at the western boundary of the old Granville townsite, known as Gastown. In 1870, the shore of Burrard Inlet was only a few yards north of this point. Through the early 1900s, Gastown was the commercial center of Vancouver. By the 1960s, it had become the center of Vancouver’s “Skid Road.” In the early 1970s, it was rehabilitated to its former stature. The success of its rehabilitation was the result of cooperation between many parties working together to beautify the streets.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
2 Water Street – 1887 – Peckinpah Restaurant – The Byrnes Block is a two-story, Victorian Italianate commercial brick building, with a later addition to the south located across a narrow passageway. It is situated on Maple Tree Square at the irregular intersection of Alexander, Powell, Water and Carrall Streets in the historic district of Gastown. The Byrnes Block is one of the oldest buildings in Vancouver located on its original site. Features include: trapezoidal floor plan, flat roof, two-story height, elaborate pedimented window hoods and surrounds on the second floor, projecting cornice with alternating large and small eave brackets, and an elaborate arched corner pediment, masonry construction, including painted brick cladding with flush-struck mortar joints on two main facades and common red brick cladding on rear facades, large rectangular storefront windows on the ground floor enabled by the use of cast iron columns; elongated double-hung 1-over-1 wood-sash windows on the second floor of the two main facades.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
1 Water Street – “Gassy Jack” – 1830-1875 – John Deighton was born in Hull, England. He was an adventurer, river boat pilot and captain, but best know for his “Gassy” monologues as a saloon keeper. His Deighton House Hotel, erected here on the first subdivided lot, burned in the great fire of June 13, 1886. Here stood the old maple tree under whose branches the pioneers met in 1885, and chose the name Vancouver for this city.
Architectural Photos, Vancouver, British Columbia
401 Main Street – Carnegie Public Library with two-story Ionic columns, dome and cupola

Kamloops British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos – My Top 8 Picks

Kamloops British Columbia Book 3 in Colour Photos

Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
118 Nicola Street – William O. Ellis House – W.O. Ellis was a local pharmacist and active community member. He built his home on tree lined Nicola Street in 1929. It has many features typical of the Arts and Crafts style, but it is also looking forward to architectural trends popularized in the 1930s. The cream-colored stucco, green window boxes, and red steps are the original colors.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
223 Nicola Street – The style of this home is typical of the 1910 period in Kamloops and is best described as anti-Victorian in sentiment. It was built in 1909. The overall shape is rectangular and right-angled. Adornment is kept to a minimum. Homes like this can be found scattered throughout Kamloops and were generally owned by small businessmen or railway officials.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
226 Nicola Street – S. B. Brooke House – This English style cottage was built in 1940 by C.N.R. Conductor Bernard Brooke (aka ‘Babbling Brooke’) and his wife Ruby, after their home at 1426 Lorne Street burned to the ground. Mrs. Brooke and her two children escaped into the -20°F weather at midnight with only their overcoats and nightclothes. The fire brigade’s efforts were hampered by the extreme cold and a broken fire hydrant. Mr. Brooke returned home to find that his wife had narrowly escaped the flames, as the front door had jammed, making her exit difficult. In 1942, C.N.R. Engineer, Archibald Legg and his new bride Janet Darlington purchased this home. The couple were former neighbors in the 800 block Battle Street when both became widowed. Sadly, Archibald Legg was killed in 1948, in a train wreck near Lytton, and Janet remained in the house until 1970. The architecture of this stucco house is unique in the Kamloops area. The steep pitched, double peaks at the front of the house are repeated once at the rear. These details were labor intensive, but add greatly to the appeal of the home inside and out. This four-bedroom cottage has only one bathroom; however, an upstairs bedroom features the original built-in vanity sink. Chamber pots were probably a necessity as one of the resident families had seven children.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
255 Nicola Street –Sacred Heart Cathedral – Sacred Heart Cathedral was built in 1921 to replace a wood frame church which had burned. Interesting architectural features include stained and leaded glass windows, red brick with white stone accents, columns, balustrade, a tower, and dome.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
822 Nicola Street – Charles and Clara Hirst built the first house on this block in 1912 in the popular classic box style. The house was subsequently bought by Robert McCall in 1921 who was elected the Police Commissioner in 1926. The house has been extensively restored to its original condition with clapboard siding, v board soffits, wood rafter fascia, and leaded glass panel windows.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
868 Nicola Street – Royal Dayton Bell House – This late Craftsman style house was built just before the outbreak of World War II by R.D. Bell. Bell was a contractor and carpenter, and given the quality of this house, he probably built it himself. The outside of the house is sided in double rows of cedar shingles. The verandah is getting smaller, as was typical of this period, but it is still a comfortable size by today’s standards and features a wide top railing and slender columns with decorative moldings. Pretty window boxes complete the cottage-like quality of the house.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
875 Nicola Street – This Bungalow style house was built in 1944. The exterior has original plaster stucco siding, wood soffits and fascia, multi-pane wood frame windows and a scallop frame to accent the front side.
Architectural Photos, Kamloops, British Columbia
115 Tranquille Road – c. 1909-1910 – The Wilson House is a one-and-one-half-story wood-frame house influenced by the Gothic Revival style and connected with William Stewart Wilson, a local farmer, businessman and politician, and the first Chairman of the Village of North Kamloops. The house has a steeply-pitched side gabled roof and side bay window, a central gabled wall dormer, and a full-width open veranda.