Preston, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

Preston, Ontario – My Top 6 Picks

John Erb, the founder of Preston, was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, a Mennonite of Swiss ancestry.  He came to Upper Canada in 1805, acquired 7,500 acres of land from the German Land Company and settled on the site of Preston where the Grand and Speed Rivers meet. He built a sawmill and a gristmill and the community grew around them. The town was originally known as “Cambridge Mills” and was later renamed after Preston, England.

Preston’s location on the Great Road into the interior of the province made it a natural stop for travelers and with its eight hotels and taverns attracted more Europeans than any other village in the area.

Preston was a prosperous manufacturing center for stoves, furniture, woolens and shoes. It became known for its mineral springs.

Architecture Photos Preston Ontario

252 Dundas Street, Preston – Gore Mutual Insurance – 1935

Architecture Photos Preston Ontario

706 Queenston Road – Queen Anne style – a two-and-a-half storey tower-like bay with gable, three-storey tower with cone-shaped roof

Architecture Photos Preston Ontario

222 Dundas Street, Preston – cobblestone architecture – Italianate with two-storey tower-like bays on either side of the doorway; dormer in attic between the bays

Architecture Photos Preston Ontario

522 King Street – two storey Italianate style with dormer in attic

Architecture Photos Preston Ontario

552 King Street – Italianate style – two-and-a-half storey tower-like bays with projecting eaves and large fretwork pieces resembling brackets

Architecture Photos Preston Ontario

480 Queenston Road – Italianate with a two-and-a-half storey tower-like bay with projecting eaves and large fretwork pieces resembling brackets