Kingston, Ontario – My Top 23 Picks

Kingston, Ontario – My Top 23 Picks

In October 1783, at Carleton Island, Captain William Redford Carleton of the King’s Royal Regiment of New York, met with the local Mississauga Indians led by the elderly Mynass. Crawford, acting for the British government, purchased from the Mississaugas for some clothing, ammunition and colored cloth, a large tract of land east of the Bay of Quinte. In September 1783, Deputy Surveyor-General John Collins was dispatched to Cataraqui by Governor Haldimand to lay out townships for Loyalist settlers. By the end of the year, the front concessions of four townships stretching from Cataraqui to the Bay of Quinte had been surveyed. A fifth township was laid out the following summer.  The land was subsequently settled by United Empire Loyalists and Britain’s allies who had been forced to leave their homes in the new United States.

Earl Street has a wide range of homes, some originally built for factory workers and others for the wealthy. They include a variety of frame, stone, stone and brick, and all-brick homes. They have different roof lines, porches, trim, chimneys, windows and transoms.

The Kingston Custom House was built 1856-59 for the government of the united Canadas. The symmetrical composition of the two-storey ashlar building, surmounted by a restrained cornice and parapet, draws on the British classical tradition. The orderly design is achieved through repeated use of semi-circular forms for doors and windows. The Custom House and the nearby Post Office are fine examples of the architectural quality of mid-nineteenth century administrative buildings.

The Kingston Penitentiary which opened on June 1, 1835 was Canada’s oldest reformatory prison.  Its layout – an imposing front gate leading to a cross-shaped cell block with workshops to the rear – was the model for other federal prisons for more than a century. It is Classical architecture in local stone.

Kingston Penitentiary represented a significant departure from the way society had dealt with its criminals. Previously, jails were used primarily as places to hold convicts awaiting execution, banishment, or public humiliation. The penitentiary imposed a severe regime designed to reform the inmate through reflection, hard work, and the fear of punishment. Inmates lived in small cells but worked together from dawn to dusk under a rigidly enforced code of silence. Kingston Penitentiary stands as a symbol of this country’s commitment to maintaining law and order.

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

213 King Street East – Italianate – decorative brickwork below cornice and above first floor windows, dormers with fish scale pattern in the gables, pediment, columns with Ionic capitals supporting the verandah – Kingston Book 1

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

197-199 King Street East – Queen Anne – three-storey turret, dormers, second floor sleeping balcony, dichromatic voussoirs, decorative brickwork in large gable

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

52 Earl Street – built by William Henry Smith in 1876 – Grove House – sunburst design on the façade; cornice brackets, oriel window, dormers

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

169 King Street East – designed in 1885 by William Newlands for banker Donald Fraser – three-bay, two-storey house is built on a high foundation; porch with paired columns on brick piers and a plain balustrade was added later; corner quoins with raised panels; channeled hood

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

200 Ontario Street – The Prince George Hotel established 1809 – the façade is actually three separate buildings – the middle part is a stone house built about 1817; new stores were built on each side of the house in 1847 – later became a hotel – third floor with mansard roof added in 1892; iron cresting on the tower; copper roof; decorative woodwork on verandah – Kingston Book 2

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

251 Brock Street – Elizabeth Cottage – Gothic Revival style – built 1840s – steeply pointed gables, projecting bays, oriel windows – accentuate play of light and shadow on smooth stucco walls; applied Gothic decorative details such as verge board trim, crockets, finials and drip moldings heighten the picturesque effect

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

12 Wellington Street – Second Empire, mansard roof, dormers with window hoods, two-storey central verandahs – Doric columns on first storey with semi-circular arch with keystone; Ionic columns on second storey with identical arch

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

80 Barrie Street – Italianate – 2½-storey tower-like bays, cornice return on gables, dormer between gables, cornice brackets, pediment above door, sidelights and transom – Kingston Book 3

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

24 Sydenham Street – Hochelaga Inn – a French Victorian mansion built in 1879 by John McIntyre and his wife Harriet, who was a relative of Sir John A. Macdonald – transformed into an inn in 1985 – three-storey tower, cornice brackets, bay window

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

743 King Street West – Romanesque style, voussoirs and banding, gabled dormer, eyebrow dormer, tall chimneys, corner quoins – Kingston Book 4

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

121 Johnson Street – Greek Orthodox Church – Romanesque style – two-storey frontispiece topped with pediment, corner quoins, dentil molding

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

Johnson Street – Second Empire style – 2½ storey, Mansard roof, dormers, iron cresting on roof, wraparound verandah

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

222 Johnson Street; 226 Johnson Street – Mansard-like roof with dormers, semi-circular and rectangular windows

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

96 Albert Street – Queen Anne style, three-storey turret, Palladian window above two-storey bay window, pediment, voussoirs with keystone – Kingston Book 5

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

208-210 Bagot Street – Edwardian, two-storey tower-like bay, dormers

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

110 Bagot Street – Tudor half-timbering style

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

116 Bagot Street – Second Empire, Mansard roof with dormers and window hoods, second floor balcony, bay windows, cornice brackets, dentil molding, pillared entrance

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

164 Queen Street – Gothic Revival – verge board trim on gables, corner quoins, and dichromatic brickwork

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

King Street West – two-storey tower, lancet and semi-circular windows, transom window above door – Kingston Book 6

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

462 King Street West – Stone Gables, 1924, part of the St. Helen’s Complex, is located on landscaped grounds bordering Lake Ontario. The grand, Tudor Revival, stone building features a steeply pitched gable roof, a projecting gabled frontispiece, prominent gable chimneys, and hipped dormer windows.

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

163 Union Street – two storeys, hipped roof with dormer, four Corinthian pillars supporting a semi-circular roof with balcony above, dentil molding, sidelights and transom windows around door

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

169 Union Street – Mansard-type roof with dormers

Architectural Photos, Kingston, Ontario

81 Lower Union Street – Gothic – 1½ storey brick cottage built in 1875 – narrow sidelight windows, porch with Doric pillars – carved wooden barge board on gable, dormers